Jenny Gathright

There was once a time when MoviePass subscribers could see a movie every single day for the cost of $9.95 a month. Now, the company has officially shut down the service and its future is still undetermined.

MoviePass parent company Helios and Matheson Analytics notified MoviePass subscribers on Friday that it would be interrupting the service effective Saturday.

British police have arrested a 66-year-old man in connection with the theft of a solid gold toilet from a palace west of London.

The toilet, titled America, is a work of art by the 58-year-old Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan. It had been installed for an exhibition at England's Blenheim Palace earlier this week.

Blenheim Palace confirmed the theft in a statement posted on Twitter.

The complex remembrance process for longtime Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe continued Saturday with a state funeral. Mugabe, who was ousted in a 2017 military coup, led Zimbabwe for 37 years and died last week at a Singapore hospital.

Mary Lou Williams seemed to learn early that playing piano would keep her alive.

Maybe she realized this at age six, when she started venturing to her white neighbors' homes to play piano for them. As Williams later recalled to the journalist John Wilson for the Jazz Oral History Project at the Rutgers Institute of Jazz Studies, she got the neighbors to stop throwing bricks into her family's house by giving them private concerts.

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just finished three weeks of radiation treatment for a tumor on her pancreas, but she told a crowd on Saturday that she is "on [her] way to being very well."

Ginsburg, speaking with NPR's Nina Totenberg at the Library of Congress National Book Festival in Washington, D.C., said she would be prepared for the start of the Supreme Court's term in October.

Police in Mobile, Ala. have arrested a 17-year-old in connection with a shooting incident that injured 10 teenagers at a high school football game Friday evening. The suspect has been charged with nine counts of attempted murder.

Updated at 11:09 a.m. ET Sunday

Defying a government ban, thousands of pro-democracy demonstrators returned to the streets of Hong Kong on Saturday and clashed with police throughout the night in one of the most dramatic and violent days of unrest since June, when the protests began.

The worst violence occurred at around 10 p.m. as riot police rushed into a metro station and arrested 40 people.

Police in Hong Kong fired several rounds of tear gas at protesters on Saturday. According to The Associated Press, they were responding to demonstrators who vandalized a police station and threw bricks at it. Tens of thousands of protesters, dressed in black, had convened for a rally — and some reportedly threw a Chinese flag into Victoria Harbour.

Police detained 600 protesters in Moscow on Saturday, according to OVD-info, an independent group that monitors protests and policing in Russia.

Demonstrators in Moscow have been demanding that opposition candidates be allowed to register in city elections. Police arrested more than 1,000 people at an election-focused protest last week.

A shopping center in Plantation, Fla., was rocked on Saturday by an event the town's fire department is calling a "possible gas explosion." It injured approximately 21 people and caused significant damage to multiple businesses. No fatalities have been reported in the immediate aftermath of the explosion.

NPR's Wade Goodwyn reported that the blast, which occurred at the Market at University shopping center, scattered debris for hundreds of yard and blew the roof off one section of the complex. It was reportedly heard and felt from miles away.

Cori "Coco" Gauff, the 15-year-old tennis player who defeated Venus Williams in her first-round match, has now advanced to the round of 16 at Wimbledon. She is the youngest player to advance this far in the tournament since 1991, when Jennifer Capriati made the semifinals as a 15-year-old.

Gauff was down a set and two separate match points in her third-round match against Polona Hercog of Slovenia on Friday, but she came back to win 3-6, 7-6 (9-7), 7-5.

Updated at 7:16 a.m. ET Sunday

Iranian officials said Sunday that for the second time the country will exceed limits set in the 2015 nuclear deal, this time enriching uranium beyond levels in the agreement.

"Today we went beyond the 3.67% ceiling of uranium enrichment, and the level of purity will be fixed as per our need," Iranian government spokesman Ali Rabiei told reporters, according to state-run IRNA news.

Legendary Green Bay Packers quarterback Bart Starr died Sunday in Birmingham, Ala. He was 85 years old.

Starr, who played for the Packers from 1956 to 1971, was the first quarterback in history to win five NFL championships. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1977.

In a statement on the team website, Green Bay Packers historian Cliff Christl wrote that Starr was "maybe the most popular player in Packers history."

A carbon tax in South Africa will go into effect on June 1. President Cyril Ramaphosa signed the measure into law on Sunday, making South Africa one of about 40 countries worldwide to adopt a carbon-pricing program.

A possible tornado struck the Oklahoma city of El Reno Saturday night and killed at least two people.

In a news conference early Sunday morning, El Reno mayor Matt White said the storm hit at about 10:30 p.m., and warning sirens sounded at 10:27 p.m.

The storm destroyed an American Budget Value Inn, damaged the nearby Skyview Estates mobile home park and also affected nearby businesses, including a car dealership.

Aniya Cox is sure she wants to be a dermatologist. What she's been less sure about is what she needs to do to get there — she's just 16, a sophomore at Eastern Senior High School in Washington, D.C.

She can remember, at various points of the past two years, desperately trying to navigate all that's required to graduate high school and get into college.

"I was all over the place, I was frustrated," Cox said. "I didn't know what I needed to do."

Cox said even the process of asking her teachers for advice — and finding time to meet with them — was confusing.

The recent discovery of mummified cats in a well-preserved tomb probably shouldn't be surprising. It's a long-established fact that ancient Egyptians loved cats.

What's perhaps more remarkable, however, is the fact that a tomb unveiled on Friday contained a sort of mummified menagerie of 50 animals — and there were mummified mice and falcons in addition to the cats.

Updated at 1:30 a.m.

International concern is mounting over the situation in Libya. The Libyan National Army, led by Khalifa Haftar, says it has now advanced into the southern outskirts of the capital Tripoli, where the U.N.-backed government is located.

On Sunday, officials said 11 people had been killed and 23 wounded in fighting in southern Tripoli, Reuters reported.

Former Sen. Ernest Hollings has died at the age of 97. Known as "Fritz," the South Carolina Democrat served more than 38 years in the Senate and ran for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1984.

Steve Hartell, who was Hollings' legislative director from 1998 to 2003, told NPR he heard the news early Saturday morning.

This story will be updated.

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring says he sees no contradiction in calling on Gov. Ralph Northam to resign even though both men have admitted to wearing blackface.

Speaking on WAMU's Kojo Nnamdi Show Monday, Herring said he felt Northam had lost the public's trust.

"When the governor's medical school yearbook photo came out, I issued a statement that expressed that action," Herring said. "I condemned that action as I have done my own. But I stopped short of calling for his resignation."

There is a happy corner of the Internet today, and it is celebrating the first North Atlantic right whale calf sighting of the season. The news is a big deal, considering the fact that the North Atlantic right whale is critically endangered, its total population is only about 450 and not a single right whale calf was spotted last season.

Updated Sunday at 12:53 p.m. ET

Jeff Light, editor and publisher of the San Diego Union-Tribune, began Saturday morning by issuing an apology. "Most Union-Tribune subscribers were without a newspaper this morning as a computer virus infected the company's business systems and hobbled the ability to publish," Light wrote.

President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping spoke over the phone Saturday. Trump confirmed the conversation via Twitter, while Xi Jinping's presence on the line was confirmed by Chinese state media.

An undersea earthquake occurred Saturday off the coast of the southern Philippines. The U.S. Geological Survey says it struck at a depth of about 38 miles and had a magnitude of 7.0. According to The Associated Press, no casualties or damage had been reported as of a few hours after the quake.

An Argentine radio show host who faced criminal prosecution for allegedly sexist remarks has struck a deal. In lieu of a more punitive route, prosecutors have ordered a five-month education in gender issues for Angel Etchecopar, commonly known by his nickname "Baby Etchecopar," and the listeners of his noontime radio program, El Angel de Mediodia.

The partial shutdown of the U.S. government, which is affecting more than 800,000 federal workers and numerous government agencies, also has consequences for the Violence Against Women Act, which expired at midnight on Friday.

Separately, both the House and the Senate passed spending deals that included clauses that would have extended VAWA until Feb. 8.

But because the law's future became inextricably tied to the larger budget debate, which hinges on a dispute between Democrats and Republicans over funding for a border wall, it was not reauthorized.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

The U.S. Senate voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh as a Supreme Court justice, while protesters gathered outside the U.S. Capitol to voice their anger at the decision.

Kavanaugh's confirmation felt nearly inevitable by Friday afternoon, when two previously undecided senators, Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., announced they would support him. But that near-certainty did not stop protesters from gathering outside the U.S. Capitol and Supreme Court early Saturday.

First lady Melania Trump wants people to stop talking so much about her fashion choices. Standing in front of the Great Sphinx in Egypt Saturday, she told reporters, "I wish people would focus on what I do, not what I wear."

Despite her expressed desires, a series of beige outfits Trump wore on her trip to Africa has been under scrutiny — not because critics find them unfashionable, but rather, because they say the clothing references harmful colonialist attitudes about the continent.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's trip to Asia has begun. Pompeo will be in Tokyo Saturday and Sunday and has already met with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe there.

On Sunday, Pompeo is scheduled to travel to Pyongyang for a meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. He will then travel to Seoul for a meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Pompeo will finish his trip in Beijing, and it is still unclear which Chinese counterparts he will meet with there.

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