Jake Troyer

Producer, On Second Thought

Jake is a producer for On Second Thought.

Though born in New Hampshire, Jake is proud to have grown up in the great state of Georgia.

Jake joined the team at GPB after earning his Bachelor's in Computer Science and his Master's in Emerging Media from the University of Georgia. Go Dawgs!

Jake fell in love with audio storytelling from a young age, being raised on radio plays and audiobooks, which later turned to podcasts and public radio. He hopes to use this love of audio to amplify the wide range of stories in the Peach State.

Ways to Connect

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The Morehouse School of Medicine had planned to use a $500,000 grant from The Department of Community Health to create The Center for Excellence on Maternal Mortality. The grant now stands to be eliminated as a part of state-wide budget cuts ordered by Governor Kemp. 

Dr. Natalie Hernandez is an assistant professor at Morehouse School of Medicine. She spoke with Morning Edition host Leah Fleming.


Antonio Johnson

The theory known as "The Third Space" claims that, for more open and creative interaction in communities, you need neutral places outside of work and home like churches, cafes and parks.

In many traditionally black neighborhoods, that third space is the barber shop. Photographer Antonio Johnson has been documenting these anchors of community across the country in his project, You Next.


Anotonio Johnson is a photographer and among the contributors for Pop-Up Zine Atlanta.  Johnson's project, You Next, aims to capture the sense of community and transformative power of the black barbershop across America.


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An estimated 10,000 baby boomers reach retirement age each day. By 2030, one in five Americans will be a senior citizen. Yet fewer are retiring when turning 65, and, for many, traditional retirement is not financially feasible or desired.

Ina Jaffe is a veteran correspondent for NPR covering aging in America. Her new series tackles the new realities of work and retirement for older Americans, sharing the personal stories of Americans faced with tough choices.


An Atlanta Journal-Constitution investigative series has uncovered a chilling reality at some senior care facilities. Get the story from the AJC reporter, Carrie Teegardin.


Senator David Perdue has a new plan to create a clearinghouse of information to help schools enhance security, and Senator Isakson has a new bill that would fund research of mass violence at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  Join the director of Georgia State University’s Center for School Safety, School Climate and Classroom Management, Kristen Varjas, and Executive Director of Safe Havens International, Michael Dorn, for a discussion of the plans and the issues that surround them.


“A Night of Georgia Music” continues a collaboration between Mike Mills, bassist songwriter and co-founder of R.E.M.; Chuck Leavell, former member of The Allman Brothers Band, now the music director and keyboardist for The Rolling Stones; and Robert McDuffie, violinist and founder of the Robert McDuffie Center for Strings at Mercer University.

They will be performing at the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra on Sept. 29, but first they stopped by On Second Thought.


Caitlyn Collins is a sociologist and author of "Making Motherhood Work: How Women Manage Careers and Caregiving."  Collins looks into “Work/Family Justice” for parents, especially as more and more women become the breadwinners of their families.  Her studies show that mothers in the United States are the most stressed of comparable western cultures and speak more about not having enough time to be with their children. Unlike many European countries, such as Sweden, the United States does not have a national support system for mothers. Collins preveiws her research into societal trends and policy with On Second Thought before her speech at the University of Georgia.


Suicides are on the rise in jails and prisons, and Georgia has one of the highest rates of inmate suicides in the nation — nearly double the national average. On Second Thought explores the circumstances effecting the numbers.

Atlanta-based freelance reporter Max Blau reported in The Macon Telegraph last month. He spoke to state officials, family members and dug into public records data. He joins On Second Thought to discuss his findings on prison suicides.


Vaping is under fire after a series of deaths and crackdowns on flavors, said to attract children to smoking. The new vaping flavors contain nicotine salts, which deliver nicotine more quickly through the body, increasing the likelihood of addiction. The effects of electronic cigarettes on school-age children have been reported as the cause of eight deaths so far.  On Second Thought speaks with Dean of GSU’s College of Public Health, Michael Eriksen, on the latest news and developments.


The Youth Climate Strike will take place Friday in Georgia, other U.S. states and about 150 countries. High school and college students are skipping class to demand action on climate change, and they are timing the strike for right before Monday’s UN Climate Action Summit. On Second Thought hears from Andrea Manning and Zeena Abdulkarim, two of the Atlanta organizers and Dr. Kim Cobb, a climate science professor.


NPR

Journalism lost a trailblazing voice yesterday. Cokie Roberts, who covered Congress for NPR beginning in the 1970s and later joined ABC News, passed away at the age of 75. 

Schooled early in political rivalries and genteel Southern manners, Roberts became a legendary reporter and best-selling author. On Second Thought spoke with Scott Simon, host of NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday, to ask about his longtime colleague and friend.


National Public Radio founding mother and media icon Cokie Roberts has passed away at age 75.  Reflect on her contributions to public radio and public discourse with Scott Simon on On Second Thought

Ellen Eldridge / GPB

One year ago, today, On Second Thought was relaunched with a whole new staff.

To celebrate the anniversary, the whole team joined Virginia in the studio to share a guest or conversation that surprised or delighted them.


Today marks one year since On Second Thought relaunched in its current form. The whole team is on air today to share what has surprised and delighted us. Join On Second Thought for the celebration!


The first round of independent test results are due out this week for the Sterigenics plant in Smyrna, and the community’s Air Quality Oversight Committee is scheduled to meet Monday.  Get an update on the story from Georgia Health News’ Andy Miller, and Web MD Brenda Goodman. Plus, take a look at what’s happening on the political side of it from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution ’s Greg Bluestein.


Emory University is hosting a three-day, live reading of The Iliad, and On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott is among the orators. Delve into the classic tale with Stan Lombardo, a professor emeritus of classics at the University of Kansas, who wrote a modern translation of it.

East Point has an urban agriculture plan aimed at improving access to green spaces and minimizing food deserts. GPB’s Ross Terrell went to check it out.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019

Sep 11, 2019

Georgia State University students studying to be sports and entertainment lawyers have a new course available to them: The Legal Life of Ludacris.  GSU law professor Moraima "Mo" Ivory took On Second Thought back to school with a look at why the Georgia superstar’s career is a window into contract law.


Jake Troyer / GPB

Improvisational theater makes for a great evening of live entertainment. Actors make up a story right on the spot, mastering the art of staying in the moment while making their scene partners look good.

Dad’s Garage, the well-established improv theater in Atlanta, is making a push to bring that art to high schools across Georgia. Their new outreach program provides teachers with videos, worksheets, and teaching guides aimed to introduce students to the world of improv. All materials are free and conform to state curriculum standards.

GPB/ Jake Troyer

Jontavious Willis got his start singing gospel in his hometown of Greenville, Georgia, but something clicked inside him when he heard the blues.

His second album, Spectacular Class, came out earlier this year. Critics and blues artists hailed it and declared him a wunderkind and genius who proves the blues is very much alive.


It’s been five years as of this summer since the first U.S. Ebola patient went to Emory University Hospital. On Second Thought looks back on the events that followed with Dr. Colleen Kraft, one of the physicians who helped with care.


Find out what songs Atlanta native Faye Webster adds to our Georgia Playlist. She'll be at the annual Music Midtown this weekend.

Georgia has nine HBCUs now, but Morris Brown College could make that number increase. It's seeking accreditation nearly a decade after losing it due to a financial mismanagement scandal.

On Second Thought invited race and culture reporter Ernie Suggs to talk about the background and threats HBCUs face. Suggs collaborated with education reporter Eric Sturgis on an Atlanta Journal-Constitution series about the health of HBCUs. They also launched a podcast called HBCU Journeys.  


On Second Thought For Friday, Sept. 6, 2019

Sep 6, 2019

Even though Hurricane Dorian spared the Georgia coast, economic impacts of the evacuation linger on. On Second Thought gets an overview of the storm’s aftermath with Emily Jones, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Morning Edition host and reporter.

Additionally, classical music is moving into the ICU. GPB’s Grant Blankenship reports on music as medicine in one Macon hospital.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019

Sep 4, 2019

Hip-hop is often singled out for not having a great track record when it comes to the objectification of women, but research seeks to shine a new light on the genre. As we kick off Music Month on Georgia Public Broadcasting, hear from Lakeyta Bonnette-Bailey and Nadia Brown, two researchers examining political rap’s influence on feminist attitudes.

On Second Thought For Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019

Sep 3, 2019

Helen Ellis's new collection of essays Southern Lady Code has been called "a cross between David Sedaris & Reese Witherspoon."

It covers everything from marriage to thank-you notes. On Second Thought reads between the lines with her ahead of her book tour stops in Atlanta and Athens.   


On Second Thought For Friday, Aug. 30, 2019

Aug 30, 2019

The story of barbecue is the story of American history and traditions — or so says author Jim Auchmutey.  Just in time for Labor Day weekend, On Second Thought talks to Auchmutey about his book, Smokelore: A Short History of Barbecue in America.


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Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor is headed to Atlanta this weekend to talk about her new children’s book Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You at Agnes Scott College as a part of the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

On this special edition of On Second Thought, we hear a rare, personal conversation with the justice recorded live for Writers on a New England Stage, a collaboration between New Hampshire Public Radio and The Music Hall in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019

Aug 28, 2019

It’s back-to-school time, which looks a lot different for women now than in decades past.  For female students, getting an education used to mean attending finishing school courses on being a “proper” wife and hostess.  The Lucy Cobb Institute helped change that. 

University of Georgia Professor Fran Teague and WUGA student Kristen Gragg visit On Second Thought to explore how this Georgia facility expanded what women could learn and do.

Georgia Power is on track to close its coal ash ponds by sometime next year, and who regulates that process could change soon.  The federal EPA wants to give that oversight to the states. The public has until Aug. 27 to weigh in on the possible transition. Grant Blankenship visits On Second Thought to discuss what it could mean for the environment.


She was a kind of real-life superhero before the days of cosplay and Dragon Con. Lulu Hurst called herself the “Georgia Wonder” in the late 19th century, saying an electrical storm had given her supernatural powers. Atlanta author Jessica Handler uses Hurst’s life for the basis of her novel, The Magnetic Girl. Unravel the tales of fact and fiction ahead of Handler’s appearance at the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

Beyoncé, Cher, Elvis…and Googoosh. The Iranian superstar’s name carries as much weight in some parts of the world as those other legends do in the U.S. Ahead of the singer-songwriter’s performance at Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center, learn about her life and career.


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