Jake Troyer

Producer, On Second Thought

Jake is a producer for On Second Thought.

Though born in New Hampshire, Jake is proud to have grown up in the great state of Georgia.

Jake joined the team at GPB after earning his Bachelor's in Computer Science and his Master's in Emerging Media from the University of Georgia. Go Dawgs!

Jake fell in love with audio storytelling from a young age, being raised on radio plays and audiobooks, which later turned to podcasts and public radio. He hopes to use this love of audio to amplify the wide range of stories in the Peach State.

Ways to Connect

It’s Shark Week on Discovery channel. Mark it with a look at these captivating fish along Georgia’s coast.

On Second Thought is joined by Paulita Bennett-Martin, Campaign Organizer at Oceana; Bryan Fluech, Associate Director of UGA’s Marine Extension and Georgia’s Sea Grant; and James Glancy, Discovery Channel Host.


Hear how goats yell, frogs screech and humans use screams as nonverbal forms of sometimes critical communication. 

On Second Thought is joined by Harold Gouzoules, an Emory psychologist, who researches animal and human screams.


Edvard Munch [Public domain] via Wikimedia Commons

Research from Emory University’s psychology department reveals the hidden intricacies of screams.

These primal vocalizations are found across various mammal species, not just humans. Rabbits, goats and even some amphibians such as frogs have been known to let out a scream in the name of self-defense.

Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

The first launch is scheduled for late 2019 for one of two cube satellites made by the Small Satellite Research Laboratory at the University of Georgia.

Cube satellites, otherwise known as CubeSats, weigh less than three pounds and are approximately the size of a loaf of bread. Catching a ride on a rocket from a “launch provider,” each satellite plans to be in orbit between two and two and a half years.


On Second Thought discusses the history of 152 Nassau Street, the site of some of county and blues music's earliest recordings, and why the building is at risk of demolition. The round table discussion is joined by Kyle Kessler, Atlanta architect and preservationist; Lance Ledbetter, co-director of Dust to Digital; Nedra Deadwyler, founder and CEO of Civil Bikes; and Steve Goodson, professor of history at University of West Georgia.


pexels.com

Georgia residents in Smyrna and Covington are just now learning that their neighborhoods have an elevated cancer risk because of exposure to airborne toxins.

In August 2018, the Environmental Protection Agency published a report showing 109 census tracts with high concentrations of ethylene oxide, a gas used to sterilize medical equipment. Two use before, the agency placed the chemical on a list of those that “definitely cause cancer.”

Residents in some Georgia neighborhoods are just starting to learn about the high concentrations of airborne toxins they breathe. Delve into an investigative piece from Brenda Goodman of WebMD and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.  Also, hear about The Georgia Environment Scan Report that sets the baseline for Georgia’s Medicaid waiver proposal. On Second Thought is joined by Ashli Owen-Smith, assistant professor of Health Policy and Behavioral Sciences at Georgia State University.


Every day, millions of Americans use -and often rely on- GPS technology to help them navigate their commutes and get precise directions to their destinations. As Americans celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, they can thank the work of a Princeton University graduate, Todd Jaegar, who conceived and developed the Apollo 11 experiment that enabled GPS technology to take a “giant leap” forward.

Meet a hidden figure named Vicky Graves, who worked for NACA, the predecessor to NASA. 


Live stage productions and plays can frustrate the deaf community. That’s why a pair of UGA alumni decided to create their non-profit, Hands In! It’s a theater company in Athens that produces original plays in American Sign Language. The co-founders and directors want to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds by spreading awareness of ASL in dramatic media.

Beach and Ede spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about their latest production, Wanderland. They also talked about their plans to expand on arts and culture for members of the deaf community. 


Stephen B. Morton / AP

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is headed to Washington D.C. Wednesday to testify in front of a Senate committee about the city’s plans for climate change.

Other Georgia municipalities across the state are dealing with higher temperatures and extreme weather. Southern leaders, regardless of politics, are now taking actions to mitigate local effects of climate change, all while the federal government continues to roll back protections.


50 years ago today, Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy. NASA allowed a film crew at the launch, documenting everything, from its preparation to mission control to the faces of the crowds witnessing the historic moment. All these pieces came together in a documentary film called Moonwalk One

David Resha, assistant professor of film studies at Emory University's Oxford College,  joined On Second Thought to discuss the cinematic elements of Moonwalk One, and why it didn't blast off at the box office. 


Wikimedia.org

Marshae Jones, an Alabama woman charged with manslaughter for allegedly starting a fight that led to her getting shot and having a miscarriage, will not face prosecution after all. The prosecutor has decided not to pursue the charge, but the incident started a conversation about negligence and culpability for pregnant women in an era of increasingly restrictive abortion laws. 

With the potential increase to the liability pregnant women face, legal questions arise surrounding when a pregnant woman is addicted to drugs. On Second Thought looked at how current and pending laws converge with Georgia’s opioid crisis.


An agriculture professor at the University of Georgia, James L. Carmon, talked his school into buying the costliest computer in existence in 1964 -- and it helped put a man on the moon. The computer was $3 million when the school purchased it. It’s now worth $25 million. Carmon's daughter, Lee, talked about her father's work. Atlanta Journal-Constitution writer Bo Emerson joined her on On Second Thought to talk about how the computer influenced the space race.

 

 


pexels.com

Cooperative solar allows customers who couldn’t normally participate, those with shady yards or rental properties, to take advantage of solar.  Walton Energy Membership Corporation, which serves northeast Georgia, is attracting some big industry players with its cooperative solar program.

Facebook chose Walton EMC for a proposed 100% renewable energy data center in Newton County.

Alice Walker, the author of the The Color Purple, turns 75 this Saturday. The Georgia Writers Museum, a nonprofit organization and exhibit space that educates the public about the state’s rich literary heritage, will host a one-day celebration of Walker’s birthday. Valerie Boyd, editor of Walker’s forthcoming journals, joined On Second Thought to talk about Alice Walker’s legacy.


Andrew Thomas Lee

From Summer blueberry to Thanksgiving pumpkin, pies are packed with memories and traditions. Everyone has their favorite, but you may not be experiencing everything this “infinite dessert” has to offer.

Paul Arguin and Chris Taylor, a married pair of scientists from the CDC turned pie-baking champions, encourage you to escape the flaky crust rut of making the same old pie, with their cookbook The New Pie.

A federal lawsuit filed Tuesday says Georgia is discriminating against Puerto Rican driver’s license applicants. The lawsuit, filed by Kenneth Caban Gonzalez, says that his documents were seized and an inspector there made him answer questions that residents of other states did not have to answer. Dr. Amy Steigerwalt, political science professor and Jorge Vasquez of the Latino Justice Agency join On Second Thought to talk about the lawsuit. 


Marianna Bacallao

Organizers and city leaders are still puzzling out why a job fair at the Anderson Conference Center in Macon recently saw an unexpectedly large turnout.

More than 3,500 job hunters stood in a line a mile long, and some continued to wait hours after the fair technically closed.  This all happened amidst reports of low unemployment rates for the county and state.


CDC Foundation

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta may not be top of mind until we hear about an infectious disease outbreak or see images of scientists in hazmat suits in the news. But the work of health leaders and innovators goes on outside of headline-level crises.

The people advocating for public health and the important causes they’re addressing are the focus of a podcast from the CDC Foundation.

Claire Stinson is host of Contagious Conversations and she visited On Second Thought to talk about her work.

Pexels.com

Last year, U.S. retail sales of essential oils topped $133 million. That number doesn’t include sales from multi-level marketers, who sell directly to buyers. While the market booms with promises of improved health and pain relief, there are some safety concerns.

Georgia Health News reporting found essential oils contributed to two calls per day on average to the Georgia Poison Center. Those cases usually involved children who are poisoned.


In the era of “fake news” and “alternative facts,” the focus on language in politics is high. What a bill is or campaign is called can be just as important as the actual contents. With the recent string of “heartbeat” and related bills in several states, we took a look at the role language plays into how we debate issues in public. 

Dr Fern Johnson, professor emerita in English at Clark University, joined us to talk about the power of connotation and the tools legislators use. Her research centers on the discourse surrounding ethnicity, race and gender.

Pages