Jake Troyer

Producer, On Second Thought

Jake is a producer for On Second Thought.

Though born in New Hampshire, Jake is proud to have grown up in the great state of Georgia.

Jake joined the team at GPB after earning his Bachelor's in Computer Science and his Master's in Emerging Media from the University of Georgia. Go Dawgs!

Jake fell in love with audio storytelling from a young age, being raised on radio plays and audiobooks, which later turned to podcasts and public radio. He hopes to use this love of audio to amplify the wide range of stories in the Peach State.

Ways to Connect

Find out what songs Atlanta native Faye Webster adds to our Georgia Playlist. She'll be at the annual Music Midtown this weekend.

Georgia has nine HBCUs now, but Morris Brown College could make that number increase. It's seeking accreditation nearly a decade after losing it due to a financial mismanagement scandal.

On Second Thought invited race and culture reporter Ernie Suggs to talk about the background and threats HBCUs face. Suggs collaborated with education reporter Eric Sturgis on an Atlanta Journal-Constitution series about the health of HBCUs. They also launched a podcast called HBCU Journeys.  


On Second Thought For Friday, Sept. 6, 2019

Sep 6, 2019

Even though Hurricane Dorian spared the Georgia coast, economic impacts of the evacuation linger on. On Second Thought gets an overview of the storm’s aftermath with Emily Jones, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Morning Edition host and reporter.

Additionally, classical music is moving into the ICU. GPB’s Grant Blankenship reports on music as medicine in one Macon hospital.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019

Sep 4, 2019

Hip-hop is often singled out for not having a great track record when it comes to the objectification of women, but research seeks to shine a new light on the genre. As we kick off Music Month on Georgia Public Broadcasting, hear from Lakeyta Bonnette-Bailey and Nadia Brown, two researchers examining political rap’s influence on feminist attitudes.

On Second Thought For Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019

Sep 3, 2019

Helen Ellis's new collection of essays Southern Lady Code has been called "a cross between David Sedaris & Reese Witherspoon."

It covers everything from marriage to thank-you notes. On Second Thought reads between the lines with her ahead of her book tour stops in Atlanta and Athens.   


On Second Thought For Friday, Aug. 30, 2019

Aug 30, 2019

The story of barbecue is the story of American history and traditions — or so says author Jim Auchmutey.  Just in time for Labor Day weekend, On Second Thought talks to Auchmutey about his book, Smokelore: A Short History of Barbecue in America.


<span style="text-transform:none">David J. Murray, ClearEyePhoto.com</span>

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor is headed to Atlanta this weekend to talk about her new children’s book Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You at Agnes Scott College as a part of the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

On this special edition of On Second Thought, we hear a rare, personal conversation with the justice recorded live for Writers on a New England Stage, a collaboration between New Hampshire Public Radio and The Music Hall in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019

Aug 28, 2019

It’s back-to-school time, which looks a lot different for women now than in decades past.  For female students, getting an education used to mean attending finishing school courses on being a “proper” wife and hostess.  The Lucy Cobb Institute helped change that. 

University of Georgia Professor Fran Teague and WUGA student Kristen Gragg visit On Second Thought to explore how this Georgia facility expanded what women could learn and do.

Georgia Power is on track to close its coal ash ponds by sometime next year, and who regulates that process could change soon.  The federal EPA wants to give that oversight to the states. The public has until Aug. 27 to weigh in on the possible transition. Grant Blankenship visits On Second Thought to discuss what it could mean for the environment.


She was a kind of real-life superhero before the days of cosplay and Dragon Con. Lulu Hurst called herself the “Georgia Wonder” in the late 19th century, saying an electrical storm had given her supernatural powers. Atlanta author Jessica Handler uses Hurst’s life for the basis of her novel, The Magnetic Girl. Unravel the tales of fact and fiction ahead of Handler’s appearance at the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

Beyoncé, Cher, Elvis…and Googoosh. The Iranian superstar’s name carries as much weight in some parts of the world as those other legends do in the U.S. Ahead of the singer-songwriter’s performance at Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center, learn about her life and career.


To write her book, Real Queer America, Samantha Allen traveled red states as a transgender women and formed unexpected connections with the people she met.  Now, she’s traveling to the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

 

Hear her take on finding tolerance and understanding on both sides of the LGBTQ rights debate.

 

 


Michael Sullivan/UGA Skidaway Institute

Forecasters predict a more active hurricane season this year, now that the El Nino weather pattern has ended. Current predictions estimate as many as 10 to 17 possible named storms.

Getting accurate models of a hurricane’s path plays a big part in coastal communities’ ability to stay safe.

Researchers at the University of Georgia aim to improve the precision of these models by launching underwater autonomous gliders to collect data from the briny deep.


UGA is using underwater gliders, a kind of autonomous robot, to collect data to help better predict hurricanes. Previous models based on satellite data could easily see water temperature at the surface, but glider data now adds important measures from below the surface that can impact the strength of hurricanes. On Second Thought talks to Catherine Edwards, assistant professor at UGA’s Skidaway Institute of Oceanography.


Judge Amy Totenberg has ruled Georgia will use its outdated voting machines for one more election. Then, it’s time for change. Delve into the 153-page ruling with GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler.  

 

A metro Atlanta police department is trying out a pilot program to help opioid users go to treatment facilities instead of jail. Travel there for the story with GPB’s Ellen Eldridge.

 

 


Pexels.com

Many Georgians are familiar with the long list of iconic movies filmed in Georgia — Driving Miss Daisy, Fried Green Tomatoes, Forrest Gump — back when filming in the state used to be a rare occurrence.

That all changed in 2008 when the film industry in Georgia exploded after the state legislature passed the Georgia Entertainment Industry Investment Act — making Georgia the Hollywood of the South.

As film and television executives debate whether to stay in Georgia, there’s still a push to increase the diversity of voices on set.


Jameelah Nuriddin is an actor and producer who got her start in Georgia before it became the "Hollywood of the South."

Nuriddin is among those featured at the Macon Film Festival this weekend. She will be joining Making Room at the Table: Women in Georgia's Film Industry panel at the festival, but first she joins to On Second Thought. 


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Georgia farmers are dealing with the news that China plans to end all imports of U.S. agriculture in response to higher tariffs.

This news comes after two years of rough conditions for the farming community, including Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Michael and stalled aid packages.

With farming ranked ninth among professions with high suicide rates by the CDC, recent research from the University of Georgia School of Social Work investigates how those stressors could affect a population already at risk.


Studies show farmers and agricultural workers are at elevated risk of suicide, and Georgia farmers have been especially hard hit by natural disasters and tariffs. 

Anna Scheyett, the dean of UGA’s School of Social Work, has been researching the problem. She visited On Second Thought to share her ideas to help.


Stanley Morales/Pexels.com

As students head back to college this month, a large portion will be taking on loans to help cover costs.

At least 1.5 million Georgians — approximately 14% of the state's population — have some amount of student loan debt, totaling to $58.7 billion.

A key consideration for prospective students is the difference between the advertised price of tuition and the actual net price of attending a higher education institution.

Atlanta magazine calculates students who graduate from some of Georgia’s largest schools end up with an average of $27,000 in debt. Before it’s time to go back to school, examine the real price of higher education. On Second Thought is joined by freelance journalist Sean Keenan.


As mental health becomes a political talking point, Georgia schools are finding innovative ways to make social and emotional learning part of the curriculum.  

Dr. Debra Murdock is the Executive Director for Cherokee County School District's Social Emotional Learning initiative. She spoke to On Second Thought on the importance of sustaining mental balance for students.


Artist Mary Beth Meehan's large-scale photographs of residents Newnan, Georgia, have exposed the shifting demographics of the city and sparked a conversation about them.  On Second Thought is joined by the artist to discuss her work.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019

Aug 7, 2019

About two dozen Georgia counties and cities are involved in one of the largest civil trials in U.S. history.  They’re some of about 2,000 local governments suing opioid manufacturers and distributors. 

Learn about a proposal floated Tuesday to group participants into an unprecedented “negotiation class.”  University of Georgia Law Professor Elizabeth Burch joins On Second Thought.

Also, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Steven Rich from the Washington Post joins On Second Thought to outline how court proceedings are used to get documents and data that show where massive amounts of the drugs have gone in Georgia -- and the deadly results.


About 250 Atlanta citizens with HIV or AIDS could face eviction. Willoughby Mariano, a reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and Patrick Saunders, editor of Project Q Atlanta, join On Second Thought to discuss why a dispute between contractors and the city of Atlanta is making it harder for the clients of the nonprofit group Living Room to pay the bills.


Marriott.com

Eleven confirmed cases of Legionnaires’ disease have been linked to the Sheraton Atlanta, with another 55 cases considered “probable” according to the Georgia Department of Health.

The hotel voluntarily closed its doors for testing on July 15, with a proposed reopening on Aug. 11 at the earliest. That places the reopening very close to Dragon Con scheduled for Labor Day weekend.


After an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease at an Atlanta hotel, health officials have identified 11 confirmed cases and dozens of other people who are potentially affected.  Dr. Allison Chamberlain of Emory University and Amy Wenk of the Atlanta Business Chronicle visit On Second Thought to explore the health and economic ramifications.

GPB’s Kalena Boller returns to On Second Thought to catch us up on current Hollywood productions for when the What’s Filming in Georgia series returns.


Gov. Brian Kemp’s administration is investigating after a Georgia Health News and WebMD report alleged airborne toxins are in Cobb County. Local officials and the company are also responding. Get an update from GPB’s Ross Terrell.

An Alabama company wants to mine for heavy minerals in southeast Georgia about four miles from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. The proposal from Twin Pines Minerals promises 150 to 200 jobs, but it’s also raised serious environmental concerns. On Second Thought hears about the issue.


Courtesy of Yacht Rock Revue

What started as a tribute to the greats, has taken on a life all of its own.

Yacht Rock Revue harnesses the nostalgic soft rock vibes of the ‘70s and ‘80s, taking the term “tribute band” to a whole new level. Whether on the road, or at their own venue Venkman’s in Atlanta, Yacht Rock Revue take their audiences on a voyage to sounds of the past.

Singer Nick Niespodziani joined On Second Thought to add a couple of songs to the Georgia Playlist, our tribute to songs written and performed by Georgians.

Niespodziani chose “Moonlight Feels Right” by Starbuck and Washed Out’s “Eyes Be Closed.”


A stretch of I-85 in southwest Georgia is a proving ground for technologies that could make such roadways ecologically sustainable.  Allie Kelly, executive director of The Ray, visits On Second Thought to talk about the road renovations.

The lack of affordable housing is a hot topic in Georgia cities.  The median home price in Georgia is on track to nearly double from 2012 in the coming years.  GPB’s Ross Terrell asked Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson about gentrification and regulation and how it affects many facets of Georgians including veterans and minorities.


Josh Green/Curbed Atlanta

Sitting just below the interchange between the Downtown Connector and Interstate 20, the neighborhood of Summerhill holds a storied past. Over the decades, the area faced segregation, being gutted by  expressways and housing two major stadiums at once.

Business boomed on Georgia Avenue in the '40s and '50s, but by the 1970s the area saw more concentrated poverty and riots. When the Olympics came to Atlanta in 1996, Summerhill housed the opening ceremonies at Centennial Olympic Stadium, which would eventually become Turner Field and then later the Georgia State Stadium.


The state has selected a vendor for its new voting machines while a case involving elections security moves through the courts. Get an update from GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler.

In Georgia, catcalls are legal.  Learn how that plays out for women in Macon.


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