Jake Troyer

Producer, On Second Thought

Jake is a producer for On Second Thought.

Though born in New Hampshire, Jake is proud to have grown up in the great state of Georgia.

Jake joined the team at GPB after earning his Bachelor's in Computer Science and his Master's in Emerging Media from the University of Georgia. Go Dawgs!

Jake fell in love with audio storytelling from a young age, being raised on radio plays and audiobooks, which later turned to podcasts and public radio. He hopes to use this love of audio to amplify the wide range of stories in the Peach State.

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NPR

Journalism lost a trailblazing voice yesterday. Cokie Roberts, who covered Congress for NPR beginning in the 1970s and later joined ABC News, passed away at the age of 75. 

Schooled early in political rivalries and genteel Southern manners, Roberts became a legendary reporter and best-selling author. On Second Thought spoke with Scott Simon, host of NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday, to ask about his longtime colleague and friend.


National Public Radio founding mother and media icon Cokie Roberts has passed away at age 75.  Reflect on her contributions to public radio and public discourse with Scott Simon on On Second Thought

Ellen Eldridge / GPB

One year ago, today, On Second Thought was relaunched with a whole new staff.

To celebrate the anniversary, the whole team joined Virginia in the studio to share a guest or conversation that surprised or delighted them.


Today marks one year since On Second Thought relaunched in its current form. The whole team is on air today to share what has surprised and delighted us. Join On Second Thought for the celebration!


The first round of independent test results are due out this week for the Sterigenics plant in Smyrna, and the community’s Air Quality Oversight Committee is scheduled to meet Monday.  Get an update on the story from Georgia Health News’ Andy Miller, and Web MD Brenda Goodman. Plus, take a look at what’s happening on the political side of it from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution ’s Greg Bluestein.


Emory University is hosting a three-day, live reading of The Iliad, and On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott is among the orators. Delve into the classic tale with Stan Lombardo, a professor emeritus of classics at the University of Kansas, who wrote a modern translation of it.

East Point has an urban agriculture plan aimed at improving access to green spaces and minimizing food deserts. GPB’s Ross Terrell went to check it out.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019

Sep 11, 2019

Georgia State University students studying to be sports and entertainment lawyers have a new course available to them: The Legal Life of Ludacris.  GSU law professor Moraima "Mo" Ivory took On Second Thought back to school with a look at why the Georgia superstar’s career is a window into contract law.


Jake Troyer / GPB

Improvisational theater makes for a great evening of live entertainment. Actors make up a story right on the spot, mastering the art of staying in the moment while making their scene partners look good.

Dad’s Garage, the well-established improv theater in Atlanta, is making a push to bring that art to high schools across Georgia. Their new outreach program provides teachers with videos, worksheets, and teaching guides aimed to introduce students to the world of improv. All materials are free and conform to state curriculum standards.

GPB/ Jake Troyer

Jontavious Willis got his start singing gospel in his hometown of Greenville, Georgia, but something clicked inside him when he heard the blues.

His second album, Spectacular Class, came out earlier this year. Critics and blues artists hailed it and declared him a wunderkind and genius who proves the blues is very much alive.


It’s been five years as of this summer since the first U.S. Ebola patient went to Emory University Hospital. On Second Thought looks back on the events that followed with Dr. Colleen Kraft, one of the physicians who helped with care.


Find out what songs Atlanta native Faye Webster adds to our Georgia Playlist. She'll be at the annual Music Midtown this weekend.

Georgia has nine HBCUs now, but Morris Brown College could make that number increase. It's seeking accreditation nearly a decade after losing it due to a financial mismanagement scandal.

On Second Thought invited race and culture reporter Ernie Suggs to talk about the background and threats HBCUs face. Suggs collaborated with education reporter Eric Sturgis on an Atlanta Journal-Constitution series about the health of HBCUs. They also launched a podcast called HBCU Journeys.  


On Second Thought For Friday, Sept. 6, 2019

Sep 6, 2019

Even though Hurricane Dorian spared the Georgia coast, economic impacts of the evacuation linger on. On Second Thought gets an overview of the storm’s aftermath with Emily Jones, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Morning Edition host and reporter.

Additionally, classical music is moving into the ICU. GPB’s Grant Blankenship reports on music as medicine in one Macon hospital.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019

Sep 4, 2019

Hip-hop is often singled out for not having a great track record when it comes to the objectification of women, but research seeks to shine a new light on the genre. As we kick off Music Month on Georgia Public Broadcasting, hear from Lakeyta Bonnette-Bailey and Nadia Brown, two researchers examining political rap’s influence on feminist attitudes.

On Second Thought For Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2019

Sep 3, 2019

Helen Ellis's new collection of essays Southern Lady Code has been called "a cross between David Sedaris & Reese Witherspoon."

It covers everything from marriage to thank-you notes. On Second Thought reads between the lines with her ahead of her book tour stops in Atlanta and Athens.   


On Second Thought For Friday, Aug. 30, 2019

Aug 30, 2019

The story of barbecue is the story of American history and traditions — or so says author Jim Auchmutey.  Just in time for Labor Day weekend, On Second Thought talks to Auchmutey about his book, Smokelore: A Short History of Barbecue in America.


<span style="text-transform:none">David J. Murray, ClearEyePhoto.com</span>

Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor is headed to Atlanta this weekend to talk about her new children’s book Just Ask! Be Different, Be Brave, Be You at Agnes Scott College as a part of the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

On this special edition of On Second Thought, we hear a rare, personal conversation with the justice recorded live for Writers on a New England Stage, a collaboration between New Hampshire Public Radio and The Music Hall in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019

Aug 28, 2019

It’s back-to-school time, which looks a lot different for women now than in decades past.  For female students, getting an education used to mean attending finishing school courses on being a “proper” wife and hostess.  The Lucy Cobb Institute helped change that. 

University of Georgia Professor Fran Teague and WUGA student Kristen Gragg visit On Second Thought to explore how this Georgia facility expanded what women could learn and do.

Georgia Power is on track to close its coal ash ponds by sometime next year, and who regulates that process could change soon.  The federal EPA wants to give that oversight to the states. The public has until Aug. 27 to weigh in on the possible transition. Grant Blankenship visits On Second Thought to discuss what it could mean for the environment.


She was a kind of real-life superhero before the days of cosplay and Dragon Con. Lulu Hurst called herself the “Georgia Wonder” in the late 19th century, saying an electrical storm had given her supernatural powers. Atlanta author Jessica Handler uses Hurst’s life for the basis of her novel, The Magnetic Girl. Unravel the tales of fact and fiction ahead of Handler’s appearance at the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

Beyoncé, Cher, Elvis…and Googoosh. The Iranian superstar’s name carries as much weight in some parts of the world as those other legends do in the U.S. Ahead of the singer-songwriter’s performance at Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center, learn about her life and career.


To write her book, Real Queer America, Samantha Allen traveled red states as a transgender women and formed unexpected connections with the people she met.  Now, she’s traveling to the AJC Decatur Book Festival.

 

Hear her take on finding tolerance and understanding on both sides of the LGBTQ rights debate.

 

 


Michael Sullivan/UGA Skidaway Institute

Forecasters predict a more active hurricane season this year, now that the El Nino weather pattern has ended. Current predictions estimate as many as 10 to 17 possible named storms.

Getting accurate models of a hurricane’s path plays a big part in coastal communities’ ability to stay safe.

Researchers at the University of Georgia aim to improve the precision of these models by launching underwater autonomous gliders to collect data from the briny deep.


UGA is using underwater gliders, a kind of autonomous robot, to collect data to help better predict hurricanes. Previous models based on satellite data could easily see water temperature at the surface, but glider data now adds important measures from below the surface that can impact the strength of hurricanes. On Second Thought talks to Catherine Edwards, assistant professor at UGA’s Skidaway Institute of Oceanography.


Judge Amy Totenberg has ruled Georgia will use its outdated voting machines for one more election. Then, it’s time for change. Delve into the 153-page ruling with GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler.  

 

A metro Atlanta police department is trying out a pilot program to help opioid users go to treatment facilities instead of jail. Travel there for the story with GPB’s Ellen Eldridge.

 

 


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Many Georgians are familiar with the long list of iconic movies filmed in Georgia — Driving Miss Daisy, Fried Green Tomatoes, Forrest Gump — back when filming in the state used to be a rare occurrence.

That all changed in 2008 when the film industry in Georgia exploded after the state legislature passed the Georgia Entertainment Industry Investment Act — making Georgia the Hollywood of the South.

As film and television executives debate whether to stay in Georgia, there’s still a push to increase the diversity of voices on set.


Jameelah Nuriddin is an actor and producer who got her start in Georgia before it became the "Hollywood of the South."

Nuriddin is among those featured at the Macon Film Festival this weekend. She will be joining Making Room at the Table: Women in Georgia's Film Industry panel at the festival, but first she joins to On Second Thought. 


pexels.com

Georgia farmers are dealing with the news that China plans to end all imports of U.S. agriculture in response to higher tariffs.

This news comes after two years of rough conditions for the farming community, including Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Michael and stalled aid packages.

With farming ranked ninth among professions with high suicide rates by the CDC, recent research from the University of Georgia School of Social Work investigates how those stressors could affect a population already at risk.


Studies show farmers and agricultural workers are at elevated risk of suicide, and Georgia farmers have been especially hard hit by natural disasters and tariffs. 

Anna Scheyett, the dean of UGA’s School of Social Work, has been researching the problem. She visited On Second Thought to share her ideas to help.


Stanley Morales/Pexels.com

As students head back to college this month, a large portion will be taking on loans to help cover costs.

At least 1.5 million Georgians — approximately 14% of the state's population — have some amount of student loan debt, totaling to $58.7 billion.

A key consideration for prospective students is the difference between the advertised price of tuition and the actual net price of attending a higher education institution.

Atlanta magazine calculates students who graduate from some of Georgia’s largest schools end up with an average of $27,000 in debt. Before it’s time to go back to school, examine the real price of higher education. On Second Thought is joined by freelance journalist Sean Keenan.


As mental health becomes a political talking point, Georgia schools are finding innovative ways to make social and emotional learning part of the curriculum.  

Dr. Debra Murdock is the Executive Director for Cherokee County School District's Social Emotional Learning initiative. She spoke to On Second Thought on the importance of sustaining mental balance for students.


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