Emily Jones

GPB Reporter & Savannah Bureau Chief

Based in Savannah, Emily Jones reports on all things coastal and manages GPB's Savannah bureau. Before coming to GPB, she studied broadcast journalism at the Columbia Journalism School and urban history at Brown University. She’s worked for the Wall Street Journal Radio Network, WHYY in Philadelphia, and WBRU and RIPR in Providence.

In addition to anchoring and reporting news at WBRU, Emily hosted the alt-rock station’s Retro Lunch as her DJ alter-ego, Domino.

Ways to Connect

Emily Cureton / GPB News

  • Savannah State University police chief on administrative leave
  • Rogue Water Tap House sued over St. Patrick's Day collapse
  • Bulloch County weighs police officers in schools
  • Port of Savannah breaks ground on new rail terminal 

Sea to Shore Alliance / Georgia Wildlife Resources Division

  • Savannah Law School students sue over closure
  • Group says bill could limit local hurricane resilience efforts
  • No baby right whales spotted as season ends
  • Uber Eats comes to Savannah, Hilton Head
  • South Carolina out of NCAA tournament 

  • GA Senators split over federal spending bill
  • Distracted driving bill moves forward
  • Activists hold urban gun violence town hall
  • Loyola, Kansas State to play Elite Eight game in Atlanta 

Cindy Hill / GPB News

  • City Market shooting suspect pleads not guilty
  • Savannah Law School will close
  • Cold weather could mean fewer turtle nests
  • USC women's basketball heads to Sweet Sixteen  

Flannery O'Connor Childhood Home on Facebook

Spring has arrived in Savannah, and with it lots of favorite annual events. Marcia Banes of Old Savannah Tours and Shannon Lowery of Visit Savannah have a few suggestions.

Shannon’s picks:

University of Georgia

  • Cobb County begins issuing student walkout punishments
  • UGA faculty urges school to address slavery
  • NCAA men's Sweet Sixteen comes to Atlanta

Emily jones / GPB News

  • Savannah could lose National Historic Landmark designation
  • Port Wentworth council member files ethics complaint
  • Hilton Head to hire Gullah Geechee liaison
  • FEMA approves Ossabaw road repair funding

Emily Jones / GPB News

Savannah could lose its National Historic Landmark District status.  That loss could threaten grants, tax incentives and professional help with historic buildings.

 

A National Parks Service study, out Wednesday, says large-scale developments out of keeping with the historic district threaten its integrity. The report also points to projects that disrupt the city’s famous downtown grid.

 

amslerPIX / Licensed via Creative Commons

  • Cleanup continues after Monday tornadoes
  • Lawyers seek new trial in 1970s case, alleging racial discrimination
  • Court rules Sumter Co. racially gerrymandered districts
  • Hawks defeat Utah Jazz 99-94 

Wikimedia Commons

  •  Liberty Co. parents sue over fatal bus crash
  • Glynn Co. tax commissioner dodges questions on renovations
  • Scientists say mysterious sea creature is a shark - or a hoax 

City of Savannah

Security will be tighter at Savannah’s St. Patrick’s Day parade this year because of a visit from Vice President Mike Pence.

 

Typically, Savannah families stake out spots along the parade route well in advance and settle in for the whole day - with tents, food, chairs, and plenty of drinks.

 

UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

When we talk about Coastal Georgia’s salt marshes, it’s often in terms of how pretty they are, or all the birds and other species that live there. But how much are they worth? Oceanographer Bill Savidge, of the University of Georgia Skidaway Institute of Oceanography, has tallied up the value of the “goods and services” the marshes provide - from commercial and recreational fishing to storm surge protection.

 

GPB’s Emily Jones asked Savidge why he decided to put the marshes in economic terms.

Savannah Stopover

It's a weekend of music and theater in Savannah, with lots to choose from. Bill Dawers of hissing lawns and the Savannah Morning News and Joshua Peacock of Do Savannah have your guide.

Joshua's picks:

Here Come The Mummies on Facebook

It's another busy weekend in Savannah, including several weekend-long festival. Claire Sandow of the Tourism Leadership Council and Heather Henley of Do Savannah have your guide.

Heather's picks:

Savannah Children's Museum on Facebook

It's another busy weekend in Savannah. Shannon Lowery of Visit Savannah and Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag have your guide to fun in the Hostess City.

Mahogany's picks:

John Alexander / Savannah Book Festival on Facebook

It's that time of year: several of Savannah's big annual festivals return this weekend. Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar and Marcia Banes of Old Savannah Tours have some tips for the festivals and more.

Marcia's picks:

Mardi Gras Tybee on Facebook

Enjoy your Savannah with some help from Connect Savannah's Anna Chandler and Paprika Southern's Siobhan Egan.

Siobhan's picks:

-Pick up some unique art at the Page Rippers Silent Art Auction. The art up for auction is all based on scenarios you might encounter in a library - and each then inspired a writer's poem, story or essay. Friday, 5-8 p.m.

Dayton Contemporary Dance Company on Facebook

Start your February right with some tips from Tanya Milton, Vice President of the Savannah Tribune, and Joshua Peacock, freelance writer and Do Savannah columnist.

Joshua's picks:

-Start the weekend a little early with a punk show at the Jinx. Athens band Shehehe will join Savannah's own Jeff Two-Names and the Born Agains and Ramages. Thursday, 10 p.m.; $8.

Grant Blankenship

Soldiers from the 3rd Infantry Division - based at Fort Stewart in Coastal Georgia - received their ceremonial send-off Tuesday before returning to Korea for the first time since the Korean War.

They are scheduled to spend a nine-month rotation on the Korean peninsula.

Emily Jones / GPB News

The Chatham County Sheriff’s Office will help patrol unincorporated areas around Savannah starting Feb. 1, the county announced Friday.

 

That is when the joint Savannah-Chatham police department will split into two separate forces after working together since 2005.

 

The new Chatham County Police Department does not have enough officers to do the job on its own. Chief Jeff Hadley said that’s in part because hiring officers takes time.

 

Ghost Coast Distillery on Facebook

There's plenty to do this weekend - especially to eat and drink. Claire Sandow of the Tourism Leadership Council and Lauren Cleland of Visit Savannah have some tips.

Lauren's picks:

Adriana Iris Boatwright for Do Savannah

The weekend is almost here, and there's plenty to do in Savannah. Heather Henley of Do Savannah and Bill Dawers of hissing lawns have some suggestions.

Bill's picks:

Blessings in a Bookbag on Facebook

Looking to have a fun weekend in Savannah? Mahogany Bowers of Blessings in a Bookbag and Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar have some ideas.

Marianne's picks:

-You can shop for a cause at Whole Foods Thursday, when five percent of sales will benefit the Forsyth Farmers' Market. Thursday, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

Winter Storm Moves On, But Roads Remain Dangerous

Jan 3, 2018
Cindy Hill/GPB

A brutal winter storm smacked the coastal Southeast with a rare blast of snow and ice Wednesday, hitting parts of Florida, Georgia and South Carolina with their heaviest snowfall in nearly three decades.

Emily Jones / GPB News

Savannah-Chatham Police Chief Jack Lumpkin said Thursday the department is poised to move forward as he leaves for Dekalb County.

He said violent crime rates have gone down during his three-year tenure, and that more citizens are working with police to solve crimes. He also touted the department's increased focus on intelligence-led policing.

Lumpkin's departure comes as the joint police department prepares to split, with separate forces set to serve the city of Savannah and unincorporated Chatham County beginning Feb. 1.

Emily Jones / GPB News

On February 1, Savannah and Chatham County will no longer share a police force. Local leaders voted earlier this year to end the merger, and create a separate Chatham County Police Department for the unincorporated areas. Jeff Hadley was sworn in as chief of that department last week.

A spokesman for Savannah Chief Jack Lumpkin deferred any questions on the demerger to elected officials.

"He's going to do well, and we'll be partners," Lumpkin told GPB at Hadley's swearing in.

Some interview highlights:

Wormsloe State Historic Site on Facebook

The holidays are upon us, and Clinton Edminster of Starlandia Supply and Spacecat Books and Molly Swagler of SCAD have a few ways to celebrate this weekend.

Georgia State Railroad Museum on Facebook

There are plenty of ways to get into the holiday spirit this weekend. Jessica Leigh Lebos of Connect Savannah and Claire Sandow of the Tourism Leadership Council have a few suggestions.

Claire's picks:

Lewis Levine / AP Photo

A five-year-old girl has died and 21 other children were injured after a bus carrying elementary school students crashed in Liberty County Tuesday morning. The deceased is Cambria Shuman, age 5, from Hinesville, Georgia.

Bus driver Evelyn Rodriguez, 62, was injured as well and transported to Memorial University Medical Center in Savannah. 

Authorities have not released the names of any of the other injured students. 

Emily Jones / GPB News

Chatham County's new police chief took his oath of office Monday. Chief Jeffrey Hadley will oversee a major change in policing the Savannah area.

Hadley will lead the county police department as it separates from the City of Savannah. After years of disputes over funding and jurisdictions, local leaders voted earlier this year to end the merged police force.

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