Emilia Brock

On Second Thought Producer

Emilia Brock is a producer for GPB's program, "On Second Thought."

Emilia is a passionate storyteller and has experience in a number of creative fields, including journalism, photography, video and radio production, fiction writing and more.

She has held a variety of professional roles, ranging from arts and culture reporting to communications for Atlanta's Delta Air Lines. She was even, at one point, a street performer in Helsinki, Finland, writing stories and poems on demand.

Emilia got her start in journalism early on, writing for her local newspaper, “The Daily Breeze,” before even graduating high school. She went on to write a weekly column for that paper, recounting her experiences as a freshman at New York University. There, she double-majored in journalism and English & American literature, and minored in music, graduating cum laude.

Emilia is originally from Los Angeles, and while she will always have love for her former cities in the Avocado State and the Big Apple, she is thrilled to make her home here, now, in the Peach State.

Brian Robbins / Robbins Photography

Whether it's the twang of a blues tune, the finger-picking of a folk song, or the shredding in heavy metal music, the guitar is central to our concept of popular music. But how does the design — the look, sound and feel — play into how a guitar becomes iconic?

Right now, the Museum of Design Atlanta, otherwise known as MODA, has an exhibition exploring exactly that. It's called "Wire & Wood: Designing Iconic Guitars" and it's on display until Sept. 29.


Jameelah Nuriddin is an actor and producer who got her start in Georgia before it became the "Hollywood of the South."

Nuriddin is among those featured at the Macon Film Festival this weekend. She will be joining Making Room at the Table: Women in Georgia's Film Industry panel at the festival, but first she joins to On Second Thought. 


Studies show farmers and agricultural workers are at elevated risk of suicide, and Georgia farmers have been especially hard hit by natural disasters and tariffs. 

Anna Scheyett, the dean of UGA’s School of Social Work, has been researching the problem. She visited On Second Thought to share her ideas to help.


Atlanta magazine calculates students who graduate from some of Georgia’s largest schools end up with an average of $27,000 in debt. Before it’s time to go back to school, examine the real price of higher education. On Second Thought is joined by freelance journalist Sean Keenan.


As mental health becomes a political talking point, Georgia schools are finding innovative ways to make social and emotional learning part of the curriculum.  

Dr. Debra Murdock is the Executive Director for Cherokee County School District's Social Emotional Learning initiative. She spoke to On Second Thought on the importance of sustaining mental balance for students.


Artist Mary Beth Meehan's large-scale photographs of residents Newnan, Georgia, have exposed the shifting demographics of the city and sparked a conversation about them.  On Second Thought is joined by the artist to discuss her work.


Courtesy of Dad's Garage

Comedian and actor Scott Adsit has been on everything from Friends to The Office, but you may know him best as Pete Hornberger from the sitcom 30 Rock. Or perhaps as the voice of Baymax from Big Hero 6.

This weekend, he's in Georgia. Adsit is doing a two-night, four-show run at Dad's Garage in Atlanta. First, he stopped by On Second Thought to share stories about how improv influenced his acting career, why he never really got into stand-up comedy, and his connection to the Marvel Universe. 


CREDIT MAPPING INEQUALITY, RICHMOND UNIVERSITY

A report by financial news and content company, 24-7 Wall Street, identifies the 25 most-segregated cities in America. Four are in Georgia, and one of those is in the top five.

The area covering Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell is number 22. Columbus comes in at 19. Macon is number 11. Albany, Georgia, comes in at No. 3.


John Locher / Associated Press

President Donald Trump is headed to both Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, Wednesday in response to the recent mass shootings in the two cities.

Along with the previous week's shooting in Gilroy, California, there were 34 people killed and dozens injured in a single week.

Rick Rojas is also in El Paso. He's the new national correspondent for the South at The New York Times. He joined On Second Thought to give us an update on the situation — and the sentiment — in the aftermath of the El Paso shooting.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2019

Aug 7, 2019

About two dozen Georgia counties and cities are involved in one of the largest civil trials in U.S. history.  They’re some of about 2,000 local governments suing opioid manufacturers and distributors. 

Learn about a proposal floated Tuesday to group participants into an unprecedented “negotiation class.”  University of Georgia Law Professor Elizabeth Burch joins On Second Thought.

Also, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Steven Rich from the Washington Post joins On Second Thought to outline how court proceedings are used to get documents and data that show where massive amounts of the drugs have gone in Georgia -- and the deadly results.


About 250 Atlanta citizens with HIV or AIDS could face eviction. Willoughby Mariano, a reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and Patrick Saunders, editor of Project Q Atlanta, join On Second Thought to discuss why a dispute between contractors and the city of Atlanta is making it harder for the clients of the nonprofit group Living Room to pay the bills.


After an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease at an Atlanta hotel, health officials have identified 11 confirmed cases and dozens of other people who are potentially affected.  Dr. Allison Chamberlain of Emory University and Amy Wenk of the Atlanta Business Chronicle visit On Second Thought to explore the health and economic ramifications.

GPB’s Kalena Boller returns to On Second Thought to catch us up on current Hollywood productions for when the What’s Filming in Georgia series returns.


Gov. Brian Kemp’s administration is investigating after a Georgia Health News and WebMD report alleged airborne toxins are in Cobb County. Local officials and the company are also responding. Get an update from GPB’s Ross Terrell.

An Alabama company wants to mine for heavy minerals in southeast Georgia about four miles from the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. The proposal from Twin Pines Minerals promises 150 to 200 jobs, but it’s also raised serious environmental concerns. On Second Thought hears about the issue.


A stretch of I-85 in southwest Georgia is a proving ground for technologies that could make such roadways ecologically sustainable.  Allie Kelly, executive director of The Ray, visits On Second Thought to talk about the road renovations.

The lack of affordable housing is a hot topic in Georgia cities.  The median home price in Georgia is on track to nearly double from 2012 in the coming years.  GPB’s Ross Terrell asked Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson about gentrification and regulation and how it affects many facets of Georgians including veterans and minorities.


The state has selected a vendor for its new voting machines while a case involving elections security moves through the courts. Get an update from GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler.

In Georgia, catcalls are legal.  Learn how that plays out for women in Macon.


COURTESY OF DISCOVERY CHANNEL

For the last 31 years, sharks have been subject to a week of media frenzy, taking place each July. But, throughout the year, they face a number of dangers that put their populations at risk.

Discovery Channel's Shark Week started Sunday and, this year, the focus is on conservation. On Second Thought dives in to explore shark facts, myths and more, from the Georgia coast to the islands of Palau. 


It’s Shark Week on Discovery channel. Mark it with a look at these captivating fish along Georgia’s coast.

On Second Thought is joined by Paulita Bennett-Martin, Campaign Organizer at Oceana; Bryan Fluech, Associate Director of UGA’s Marine Extension and Georgia’s Sea Grant; and James Glancy, Discovery Channel Host.


Grant McGowan

Theatrical productions with more than one act can run anywhere from 90 minutes to about three hours. One famous — some might say infamous — adaptation of The Great Gatsby lasted a whopping eight hours.

That is a commitment from the cast, crew and the audience.

What if you could see a number of plays in less time? The Annual Atlanta One-Minute Play Festival brings brevity to the boards. It showcases full productions, rehearsed and performed by actors. 


Hear how goats yell, frogs screech and humans use screams as nonverbal forms of sometimes critical communication. 

On Second Thought is joined by Harold Gouzoules, an Emory psychologist, who researches animal and human screams.


Photo by Emilia Brock

The newest Ken Burns series premiering in September follows the vast and varied evolution of country music over the 20th century. The eight-part series begins not in Nashville, nor Bristol, but Atlanta.

That's because, in 1923, OKeh Records music pioneer Ralph Peer came from New York to the South and set up a temporary recording studio smack dab in downtown Atlanta at 152 Nassau Street. That's where he recorded early country, blues, jazz and gospel artists, including what is known as country music's first hit, "The Little Old Log Cabin in the Lane" by Fiddlin' John Carson. 

Dorothy Kozlowski/UGA

The first launch is scheduled for late 2019 for one of two cube satellites made by the Small Satellite Research Laboratory at the University of Georgia.

Cube satellites, otherwise known as CubeSats, weigh less than three pounds and are approximately the size of a loaf of bread. Catching a ride on a rocket from a “launch provider,” each satellite plans to be in orbit between two and two and a half years.


On Second Thought discusses the history of 152 Nassau Street, the site of some of county and blues music's earliest recordings, and why the building is at risk of demolition. The round table discussion is joined by Kyle Kessler, Atlanta architect and preservationist; Lance Ledbetter, co-director of Dust to Digital; Nedra Deadwyler, founder and CEO of Civil Bikes; and Steve Goodson, professor of history at University of West Georgia.


Residents in some Georgia neighborhoods are just starting to learn about the high concentrations of airborne toxins they breathe. Delve into an investigative piece from Brenda Goodman of WebMD and Andy Miller of Georgia Health News.  Also, hear about The Georgia Environment Scan Report that sets the baseline for Georgia’s Medicaid waiver proposal. On Second Thought is joined by Ashli Owen-Smith, assistant professor of Health Policy and Behavioral Sciences at Georgia State University.


Every day, millions of Americans use -and often rely on- GPS technology to help them navigate their commutes and get precise directions to their destinations. As Americans celebrate the upcoming 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, they can thank the work of a Princeton University graduate, Todd Jaegar, who conceived and developed the Apollo 11 experiment that enabled GPS technology to take a “giant leap” forward.

Meet a hidden figure named Vicky Graves, who worked for NACA, the predecessor to NASA. 


Live stage productions and plays can frustrate the deaf community. That’s why a pair of UGA alumni decided to create their non-profit, Hands In! It’s a theater company in Athens that produces original plays in American Sign Language. The co-founders and directors want to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds by spreading awareness of ASL in dramatic media.

Beach and Ede spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about their latest production, Wanderland. They also talked about their plans to expand on arts and culture for members of the deaf community. 


Stephen B. Morton / AP

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is headed to Washington D.C. Wednesday to testify in front of a Senate committee about the city’s plans for climate change.

Other Georgia municipalities across the state are dealing with higher temperatures and extreme weather. Southern leaders, regardless of politics, are now taking actions to mitigate local effects of climate change, all while the federal government continues to roll back protections.


John Bazemore / AP

Atlanta police are cracking down on scooters after at least one death and hundreds of injuries. It's illegal to ride them on sidewalks or to violate other traffic laws while riding.

The focus might be shifting to electric powered two-wheelers, but collisions involving traditional bikes, cars and pedestrians are on the rise across the U.S. and in Georgia. The Atlanta Regional Commision reports a 53% jump in such accidents between 2006 and 2015. The number of related serious injuries or fatalities went up by 26% in that time.


50 years ago today, Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy. NASA allowed a film crew at the launch, documenting everything, from its preparation to mission control to the faces of the crowds witnessing the historic moment. All these pieces came together in a documentary film called Moonwalk One

David Resha, assistant professor of film studies at Emory University's Oxford College,  joined On Second Thought to discuss the cinematic elements of Moonwalk One, and why it didn't blast off at the box office. 


50 years ago today, Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy. A few days later, on July 20, 1969, the first two humans landed on the moon — Commander Neil Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin.

Also at the launch was a film crew, documenting everything, from its preparation to mission control to the faces of the crowds witnessing the historic moment. These were mixed in with astounding footage taken by Armstrong and Aldrin, which all came together in a documentary film called Moonwalk One.


Courtesy of University of Georgia

The song "Daisy Bell" wasn't a hit in 1961, but it was a triumph. The singer? The IBM 7094, the largest, most expensive computer available at the time. And thanks to James Carmon, professor in the University of Georgia's School of Agriculture, the school purchased one in 1964.

 

Not only could the computer sing, it helped put man on the moon.

 

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