Emilia Brock

On Second Thought Producer

Emilia Brock is a producer for GPB's program, "On Second Thought."

Emilia is a passionate storyteller and has experience in a number of creative fields, including journalism, photography, video and radio production, fiction writing and more.

She has held a variety of professional roles, ranging from arts and culture reporting to communications for Atlanta's Delta Air Lines. She was even, at one point, a street performer in Helsinki, Finland, writing stories and poems on demand.

Emilia got her start in journalism early on, writing for her local newspaper, “The Daily Breeze,” before even graduating high school. She went on to write a weekly column for that paper, recounting her experiences as a freshman at New York University. There, she double-majored in journalism and English & American literature, and minored in music, graduating cum laude.

Emilia is originally from Los Angeles, and while she will always have love for her former cities in the Avocado State and the Big Apple, she is thrilled to make her home here, now, in the Peach State.

Pitbulls: they’re the dog that “America loves to hate,” and Jason Flatt is devoted to saving them. We learn how tragedy and depression transformed Flatt, and how a puppy saved his life. Now, he spends his time saving the most neglected — and least wanted — dogs that come across his foundation, Friends to the Forlorn.


L-R: Robb Cohen; Amy Harris; Amy Harris; Paul R. Giunta / Invision/AP - Collage compiled by Jake Troyer

We're heading into the last week of January. Maybe you're still on a fresh start for the new year, and keeping up with your resolutions. But are your music playlists still cycling through last year's hits?

If that's the case, then you'll be glad to know that every month, Atlanta's Paste Magazine publishes a list of upcoming record releases to keep you up to date on fresh tunes. 


Courtesy of Will Brown / Kate DeCiccio for Amplifier / Courtesy of Donal Thornton and Tresor Dieudonné

As 2019 drew to a close, protests spilled into cities from Hong Kong to Santiago, Paris to Tehran, and Khartoum to La Paz. People around the world flocked to the streets, often with handmade signs, addressing their objections to policy changes, power grabs and cutbacks.

The power of images to communicate disagreement is the subject of an exhibition now on view at the Museum of Design Atlanta (MODA). 


For the last five years, we’ve heard cries of “fake news” from media critics on both sides of the political aisle. This year, Emory University offered first-year students the opportunity to enroll in a course about fake news. It’s one of Emory’s “evidence-focused seminars” intended to prepare students for college-level research. We speak to Dr. Judith Miller, who teaches the course, and Natalia Thomas, one of the students who took the class last semester.


It made headlines when Queen Elizabeth II agreed to grant Prince Harry and his wife Meghan Markle their wish for a more independent life, allowing them to move part-time to Canada while remaining firmly in the House of Windsor. We speak with Emory history professor Dr. Patrick Allit and CNN senior writer Lisa Respers France to analyze the historical context and current implications of their move to this side of the pond.


Todd Wawrychuk / ©A.M.P.A.S.

Nominations for the 92nd Academy Awards were announced Monday. The list, which skews heavily white and male, has faced fierce criticism in the last few days.

The discussion is all too familiar for many, resurrecting conversations about #OscarsSoWhite and the lack of representation for both women and people of color in the esteemed awards.


Rock n’ Roll hits the page in Ian Port’s The Birth of Loud. Hear him tone it down to speaking volume when he stops by On Second Thought.


John Locher / Associated Press

Whether you're searching something on Google, assessing a mortgage rate, or applying for a job, much of our lives today is informed by artificial intelligence. Or, the less scary term: intelligent algorithms.

While AI helps systems operate quickly, it's not perfect. Like humans, these technologies are only as good as the information they get. 


Technology and artificial intelligence are making leaps and bounds, but that doesn’t mean the technology is infallible. "Algorithm bias" does exist, largely because of the datasets from which these systems learn. Dr. Ayanna Howard of Georgia Tech joined On Second Thought to explain the concerns of trusting this technology completely, as well as ways we can make it better.


Robert Jimison of GPB breaks down the processes and benefits of the 2020 Census, and why local and state governments want you to participate.

National Book Award nominee Margaret Wilkerson Sexton’s latest novel, The Revisioners, crosses differences in race, wealth and time itself.  It came out Nov. 5, and we revisit our conversation with the author.


Courtesy of Popeyes

You no doubt took part in, or at least heard about last year's battle between Popeyes and Chick-Fil-A during the so-called "chicken sandwich wars." Well, at the end of 2019, Popeyes dropped some new weapons into its arsenal: The Offset, The Quavo, The Takeoff and the Tour Rider.

These were new meal options for people ordering from the Lousiana-based fast food restaurant on Uber Eats. The first three are named for the members of the Atlanta hip-hop group Migos. And The Tour Rider? That's apparently real. When Migos is on tour, their actual tour rider — or the list of things they require — includes a whole mess of Popeyes.


Elijah Nouvelage / AP Photo

When U.S. Senator for Georgia Johnny Isakson announced last year that he would be stepping down, months passed before Governor Brian Kemp announced that Kelly Loeffler would be his temporary replacement.

She was sworn in by Vice President Mike Pence on Monday.


On Monday, Vice President Mike Pence swore in Georgia’s new U.S. senator, Kelly Loeffler. While she may be co-owner of Atlanta’s professional women’s basketball team, The Dream, and a successful finance executive, many Georgia voters don’t know much about their new senator. Greg Bluestein of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution joins On Second Thought to tell us what we know, what we don’t know, and what to pay attention to in the coming months.


Instead of condemnation, strangers showed up to support a mother of four arrested for leaving her teenage son with down syndrome at an Atlanta hospital. Hear a debrief with GPB’s Jade Abdul-Malik on what families of the developmentally disabled want you to know.


Atlanta-based author Nic Stone’s debut middle-grade novel, Clean Getaway, follows the story of a young boy embarking on a road trip with his grandmother. Hear how Stone balanced writing for middle-grade readers while still exploring complex topics.


Courtesy of the artist. © Alex Harris

What do you see when you picture the South? Maybe trees draped in Spanish moss, or plantations and rows of crops? Perhaps civil rights icons, or your mother's home cooking? Could even be the bustling interstates that now connect the region.

Safe to say, the South can be seen through many lenses, as demonstrated by The High Museum of Art's ongoing Picturing the South project. The long-running series commissions photographers to add images to the collection, which follows one rule: the photos have to be made in the South.


When Refuge Coffee Co. founder Kitti Murray and her husband moved to Clarkston, Georgia, they never expected they’d be running a coffee shop to help refugees find their footing. Yet, that’s exactly what they do today. Hear from Kitti Murray and a former Refuge Coffee trainee on the impact of the cafe on the community.

This Christmas, Atlanta’s Fox Theatre celebrates its 90th birthday.  The “Fabulous Fox,” as it’s known, has fought its way back from extinction numerous times. Hear from Fox Theatre President and CEO Allan Vella about the dramatic twists and turns of this iconic building’s history.


Clockwise from Top Left: Owen Sweeney; Owen Sweeney; Brent N. Clarke; Dario Cantatore; Amy Harris; Jack Plunkett / Invision/AP - Collage compiled by Jake Troyer

This year, Lil Nas X's "Old Town Road" spent a record 19 weeks at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart. Now, it holds the title of the longest running number one single in the chart's history.

It's symbolic of the year in music, in a way — an array of new voices and up-and-comers throwing music industry standards out the window. Whether it's Lizzo's love of the flute, or Lil Nas X's combo of country and trap music, the new age of music seems to be twisting, bending and re-imagining the boundaries of popular music.


A 2011 essay in Garden & Gun magazine called “Redefining the Southern Belle” got lots of responses; much of the feedback was positive, some not, but it all opened explorations of what “Southern woman” meant then and now. The discussions that followed led to a new book of portraits and interviews with artists, innovators and entertainers — from Reese Witherspoon to Oprah, Dolly Parton to Beyoncé, along with several names you may not know yet.

We hear more about the new book from Garden & Gun, called Southern Women: More Than 100 Stories of Innovators, Artists and Icons, from Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice and Euneika Roger-Sipp, two women featured in the magazine and its deputy editor, Amanda Heckert.


Jake Troyer

The start of a new decade is often viewed as a beginning of a new chapter. Before that page turns, On Second Thought looked at some of the benchmark changes over the past decade - both within Georgia, and across the world. 

Nicole Smith, features editor at the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Thomas Wheatley, articles editor at Atlanta Magazine, joined On Second Thought to talk about some of the biggest developments in Georgia over the past 10 years, from the burgeoning film industry in Atlanta to politics throughout the state.


Jasmine Wallace Carter / Pexels

When two people decide to get married, they're probably not thinking about the possibility of divorce. But that's exactly what comes into discussion during a prenuptial agreement or, as it's perhaps more commonly known, a prenup.

A prenup is designed to pre-negotiate terms and protect the division of marital property. That includes money, of course, as well as items of value that may not be worth a lot in terms of finances; say, for example, a family heirloom — or even your pet.


While the holiday season may be a popular time for couples to impulsively “pop the question,” those couples generally do not think about the possibility of divorce. Family law attorney Randy Kessler joins On Second Thought to talk about why couples should consider a prenup. 

One Lawrenceville author turns real folk stories into fictional novels. Hear from author Tim Westover about his new book The Winter Sisters and how he draws upon local Southern folklore to craft his historical fiction stories. 


Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

On Second Thought aired a special broadcast about the story of how Richard Jewell's life changed when The Atlanta-Journal Constitution published his name as the primary suspect in the 1996 bombings at Atlanta's Centennial Olympic Park.

In that audio documentary, we learn about how Jewell's legal team sued The Atlanta-Journal Constitution — along with other news organizations — for defamation. The AJC fought the suit, and eventually won. Now, the paper is disputing how it is being portrayed in the film Richard Jewell, which hit theaters Friday.


When Atlanta hosted the 1996 Olympics, terror struck. In the rush for justice, the wrong man was presumed guilty. “Mistaken: The Real Story of Richard Jewell” follows Jewell’s descent from hero to villain in the court of public opinion. Hear this On Second Thought special broadcast featuring interviews with Kent Alexander, U.S. Attorney for the northern district of Georgia at the time of the 1996 Olympics, journalist, Kevin Salwen and Tom Johnson, former head of CNN.


Atlanta Judge Christopher Portis recently launched a court program to help homeless defendats in Atlanta. Hear how the new initiative aims to help people get off the streets and navigate the court system.


L: Samantha S. Shal / R: Ken Lackner

Like the endearing story presented in 1965's animated special A Charlie Brown Christmas, the music from the feature has endured as a holiday classic. The mellow, jazzy piano tunes were arranged by Vince Guaraldi.

And for the 12th year, you can go hear this delightful soundtrack performed live. A trio of musicians — Jeffrey Bützer on drums, T. T. Mahony on keys and Mike Beshera on bass — will once again perform this 40-minute score for Georgia audiences in Atlanta, Savannah and Woodstock.


Matt Misisco

He is, by his account, "World Champion." Of what? Depends on when you ask. 

It may be easier to pin down Judah Friedlander's resume as an actor and comedian in movies like Wet Hot American Summer, American Splendor, Meet The Parents and The Wrestler. Or maybe you'd recognize him — and his hats — from NBC's 30 Rock, where he played the slumpy and kind of sleazy Frank Rossitano.


Comedian Judah Friedlander is probably best known for his role as Frank Rossitano on NBC’s 30 Rock, but his new stand-up series Judah Friedlander: Future President takes a satirical look at America and its complicated place on the world stage. He performed in Atlanta a few weeks ago and joins On Second Thought to share his approach to stand-up.


It seemed like winter came early this year with record low temperatures dipping below the 20s. As the cold weather continues, cozy up with a blanket, warm cup of tea and a book.

On Second Thought is joined by three of Georgia’s booksellers, Janet Geddis owner of Avid Bookshop in Athens, Annie Jones owner of The Bookshelf in Thomasville and Charles Robinson co-owner of Eagle Eye Book Shop in Atlanta. They help choose which books to crack open this holiday season.


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