Bryant Urstadt

Bryant Urstadt is the editor of Planet Money, NPR's podcast about economics. Planet Money specializes in taking complicated subjects, finding the people at the center of them, and turning their stories into entertaining narratives. He is part of the team which won a Peabody for reporting on the fake bank accounts scandal at Wells Fargo.

Before joining Planet Money, he was the features editor at Bloomberg Businessweek, which also specialized in taking complicated subjects, finding the people at the center of them, and turning their stories into entertaining narratives. There, he was part of a group which won numerous National Magazine Awards, for general excellence, as well as for single-issue topics like coding, and the financial crisis. He also oversaw online features, and helped build the Businessweek web site.

Before that, he was a full-time writer, and wrote for magazines like New York, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker, Harpers, Outside, Businessweek, and many other places, covering everything from hockey to derivatives.

And before that, he was an NPR listener who sent checks to his local member station.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

What do silver dollars, Venmo, and Brexit have in common? They're all on the minds of our listeners.

Today on the show, we take listener questions, and hunt for answers. We try to figure out how Venmo makes money, how the tax system really works, why truckers are buying helicopters in England, and more.

As President Trump sat across the table from Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G20 in Buenos Aires, things seemed to be looking up. Their two governments, which have been embroiled in a trade war for months, were agreeing to a 90-day truce.

After Amazon announced it would open a new office in New York's Long Island City neighborhood, a fight erupted in Planet Money's office. A similar fight is playing out all across the city. Some people think: "Great! This will bring lots of new jobs and investment to New York." Others worry Amazon's presence will raise rents and displace people. Plus, New York gave the company a huge subsidy in the form of tax incentives.

It's confusing times to work at the Federal Reserve. The playbook for steering the economy doesn't work like it used to. So what's changed? We crash a party of central bankers to get some answers.

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