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Shedding A Light On Dating Violence

May 6, 2016
Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Teen reporters with VOX Teen Communications in Atlanta are turning their attention to the problem of relationship violence. The United Nations reports that children who grow up in abusive households are more likely to become perpetrators or victims of domestic violence later in life. Many types of abuse aren’t physical.  One common form of psychological abuse is known as gaslighting.

Linda Chen / On Second Thought

Sunday is Mother's Day, a tough time for some new mothers whose babies are in the neonatal intensive care unit, or NICU. Babies in the NICU are either too small or too sick to go home. Research finds cuddling is important for babies who are born prematurely or have serious health issues, but some parents are unable to stay in the hospital and give their newborns the constant affection they need. A program at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta allows volunteers to hold, cuddle, and rock babies.

Actor Tony Hale first rose to fame as the ultimate mama's boy Buster Bluth on the show "Arrested Development." Now Tony Hale stars in the HBO series, “Veep.”  His character is the personal assistant to President Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Hale isn’t from Georgia, but he spends a lot of time here because his parents live in the Macon area. We spoke with him about his career.

We get a look at "gaslighting," a commonly used tactic of psychological abuse in romantic relationships from a Vox Teen Communications reporter.

Patrick Harbron / HBO

Actor Tony Hale first rose to fame as the ultimate mother's boy Buster Bluth on the show, Arrested Development. Now Hale stars in the HBO series, “Veep.”  His character is the personal assistant to President Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Hale isn’t from Georgia, but he spends a lot of time here because his parents live in the Macon area. We talk with him about his career. 

 

From severe droughts in Georgia to contaminated water in Flint, Michigan, we've seen the fragility of the nation's water supply tested. A power outage knocked two Atlanta pumping stations offline last weekend, turning what comes from the tap into a safety hazard. We  speak with Atlanta Department of Watershed Management Commissioner Jo Ann Macrina about efforts to expand the city's emergency water supply.

Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary

Students across the Southeast took part in an underwater robotics competition last weekend. Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary hosted the event and created a variety of challenges for the robots to complete. Each team had to build and program a remotely operated vehicle. GPB Savannah’s Gabrielle Ware was at the competition and brings us this audio postcard.

 

Kirk Jordan / flickr

Water has made a lot of headlines in the past year. Severe drought in the West, contaminated water in Flint, Michigan, and last weekend, a power outage knocked two Atlanta pumping stations offline. Right now, Atlanta has only about three days of raw water in reserve. That's about to change.

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Biologists have studied animal intelligence for years, but primatologist Frans de Waal believes we underestimate exactly how smart they are. He believes humans tend to observe animal behavior with their own exceptionalism in mind. He bridges the dividing line between humans and animals in his new book "Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

fullercallaway.org

Born in the small town of LaGrange in west Georgia, Fuller E. Callaway rose from relative obscurity to become an influential member of the New South. He built up a considerable fortune as a textile manufacturer, but his legacy in Georgia far supersedes his business accomplishments. Two historians, Buck and Carol Melton, delve into the life of the Georgia industrialist in their new book Fuller E. Callaway: Portrait of a New South Citizen.

We talk with both authors about how Callaway’s influence still endures in the Peach State.

Agriculture continues to be a heavyweight industry in Georgia, contributing over $75 billion to the state’s economy. Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black wants to double down on that success with Georgia Grown. The branded logo is associated with producers, sellers, manufacturers, and any Georgia business that wants to further align itself with the Peach State. We sit down with Black to talk about Georgia’s perception around the world as an agricultural player.

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The blight problem in Atlanta continues to be a financial concern for the city. Conservative estimates conclude that Atlanta is spending millions of dollars in code enforcement and services on worn down and vacant properties. Recently, these abandoned lots have also been increasingly used as dumping sites for dead bodies. The corpses recovered included several vagrants who overdosed on narcotics and two female murder victims who were allegedly strangled to death at separate times.

georgiagrown.com

Agriculture continues to be a heavyweight industry in Georgia, contributing over $75 billion to the state’s economy. Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black wants to double down on that success with Georgia Grown. The branded logo is associated with producers, sellers, manufacturers, and any Georgia business that wants to further align itself with the Peach State.

Southern Foodways Alliance

When it comes to Southern cuisine, cornbread is required on the plate. But while cornbread unites the South, it can also divide us. Kathleen Purvis, food editor with The Charlotte Observer, writes there is a racial and cultural divide over ingredients.

Linda Chen / On Second Thought

Rapper Killer Mike started out as Michael Render from southwest Atlanta's Adamsville neighborhood. As a solo artist and in his work with Run The Jewels, his lyrics often address issues related to social injustice. Lately, Killer Mike has been a familiar face on the campaign trail in support of Senator Bernie Sanders for President. He talks with us about his music, the presidential race, and his own political future.

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Atlanta rapper Killer Mike is determined to see Bernie Sanders in the White House. We talk with him about the presidential race, the Black Lives Matter Movement, and his music.

Nationally, about 60% of immigrants forced to go to immigration court win their cases and avoid deportation. In Lumpkin, Ga., thousands of immigrants go through that court each year; more than  97%  lose their cases and are deported. NPR investigative reporter Caitlin Dickerson looked at how the court operates, and shares the story of one immigrant whose fate was determined in Lumpkin. 

Isabel Seliger for NPR

When non-citizens in the U.S. are convicted of a crime, they often go through two justice systems. One is criminal court that all of us know about.  The other is immigration court.

It's the centennial year of the Pulitzer Prize. We'll spend some time with past winners who have a connection to Georgia all year long in a new series we're calling Pulitzer Peaches. You may know our first guest from his hilarious and satirical cartoons in The Atlanta-Journal Constitution

    

Alison Rosa

Georgia native and crime writer Karin Slaughter is the author of several international best-sellers. Her latest book "Pretty Girls" is about two women whose teenage sister vanished without a trace. The paperback edition of the book came out last week. 

  

We speak with Slaughter about the inspiration for the book, what makes a good thriller, and the reason why she sets her novels in Georgia.

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Last year, the Department of Justice came down hard on the Georgia school system after they learned about the segregation and isolation of disabled students into special "psycho-educational programs." But now, another investigation into these special programs has revealed that a disproportionate amount of black students are sent to these facilities. New reporting reveals that students are offered little or no psychiatric help and spend much of the day either playing games or sitting in isolation.

Last year, the Department of Justice came down hard on the Georgia school system after they learned about the segregation and isolation of disabled students into special "psychoeducational schools." But now, another investigation into these special schools has revealed that a disproportionate amount of black students are sent to these facilities. New reporting reveals that students are offered little or no psychiatric help and spend much of the day either playing games or sitting in isolation.

Judge Horace Ward of Georgia died on Saturday, April 23 at the age of 88. 

Ward graduated with honors from Morehouse College and then got a master's degree from Atlanta University. Those are both historically black institutions. When he applied to the School of Law at the University of Georgia in 1950, he was refused because of his race.  The Board of Regents offered to help him go to school in another state. But Ward insisted he wanted to study at UGA. Ward's case was thrown out seven years later and he went to Northwestern University in Illinois where he earned his law degree. 

GPB News/Linda Chen

We’re joined by our Friday panel in The Breakroom to discuss and debate the week’s news. We talk about the University of Georgia paying Ludacris a huge amount of cash, liquor and condoms for a 15 minute performance, Beyonce’s new visual album called “Lemonade”, and how the FBI fabricated evidence that sent dozens of people to death row.  

An Atlanta artist is trying to get beyond the statistics about sexual abuse. All month long, Jessica Caldas has marked an “X” on the ground in chalk every 107 seconds. That’s how often someone is sexually abused in the U.S., according to federal data. We talk with her about the message she hopes people will take away from her art. 

Church of Scientology

Earlier this month, Georgia's first Ideal Church of Scientology opened its doors. The 45,000-square-foot mansion that houses the church is located in Sandy Springs, just outside Atlanta. We talk to a Scientologist from Atlanta about what draws him to the church, and how it has diversified.

Wikimedia Commons

April is Financial Literacy Month. It was designated in 2003. The Great Recession revealed just how little average Americans know about their finances. So, in the spirit of education, we break down something we hear a lot about, especially during election time: Social Security. We also talk with Social Security expert Mary Beth Franklin, who is a contributing editor with InvestmentNews.

Alexia Ridley / GPB

Family members of the victims joined hundreds of friends, students, and staff at a Thursday evening ceremony on the University of Georgia campus in Athens honoring the four UGA students killed in a collision Wednesday night.

Synchronicity Theatre

In 2011, Georgia executed Troy Davis, a death row inmate convicted of killing a Savannah police officer. The case sparked international interest. Leaders including former President Jimmy Carter, Pope Benedict XVI, and former Georgia Congressman Bob Barr spoke out against the execution. A play at the Synchronicity Theatre in Atlanta presents both sides of the Troy Davis case.

Donald Trump’s political rallies have been anything but dull over the past few months. Supporters and protestors have attended the gatherings in large numbers and their interactions have often turned ugly. Violence at Trump-sponsored events has been frequent, including several instances of protestors being assaulted by Trump supporters. Because these events are considered private events that are hosted by Trump’s campaign, the rules inside his rallies are much stricter than many people realize.

Marcus Autism Center

One of the first signs of autism in infants is the delay of what's known as babbling. Babbling is exactly what it sounds like: indiscernible words of jumbled consonants and vowels strung together. It's adorable when babies do it, but it’s also an important stage of language development. Gordon Ramsay, a doctor at the Marcus Autism Center in Atlanta, has collected the largest database of baby babbles.

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