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Come this December, millions of American workers will be eligible for overtime pay. That's because of a new policy finalized by the Labor Department. In our regular series, “Break It Down,” we talk about the history of the 40-hour work week. Then, Wall Street Journal reporter Melanie Trottman discusses how the new overtime protections work and who’s covered by them.

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A poll by the evangelical firm Barna Group found Christians who regularly attend church, and those who don’t, have very different feelings when it comes to presidential candidate Donald Trump. More than a third of churchgoers hold unfavorable opinions of the de facto Republican nominee while other Republicans who identify as Christian generally like him.

First, we speak with Anthony Mackie, who is currently lighting up the silver screen as Falcon in “Captain America: Civil War.” Mackie’s next role is a completely different heroic challenge. He plays Martin Luther King Jr. in the upcoming HBO film, “All the Way.” Bryan Cranston will star alongside Mackie in the role of Lyndon B. Johnson. The story introduces the two political figures at the height of the Civil Rights movement in a country torn apart by the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

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The Breakroom comes together to discuss the week’s news, including tuition for sports and whether the viewing habits of our politicians matter.

Joining us for The Breakroom:

  • Greg Williams, host of the conservative radio show "Greg’s List"
  • Bee Nguyen, Executive Director of Athena’s Warehouse
  • Roxanne Donovan, Associate Professor of Psychology and Interdisciplinary Studies at Kennesaw State University
  • Chuck Reece, Editor of the Bitter Southerner 

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The nationwide debate concerning transgender bathroom access has finally made its way to Georgia. A policy issued from the White House states that school systems that deny transgender youths access to the facilities of their choice could lose federal aid as a result.

We chat with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Eric Stirgus about the mandate and what effect it may have on Georgia schools.

Some were sentenced to prison. Some to jail. Others to home confinement. But many of the eleven Atlanta Public Schools educators who were convicted of racketeering in a cheating scandal last year can now return to the classroom. We learn more from Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Molly Bloom. Plus, the Atlanta Public Schools cheating trial was the longest in the state’s history. The appeals process is set to begin later this year. But before that can happen, transcripts of months of testimony need to be completed. That task falls to court reporter Evelyn Parker.

Kent D. Johnson / Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP, Pool, File

Many of the 11 Atlanta Public Schools educators who were convicted of racketeering in a cheating scandal last year can now return to the classroom. We learn more from Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Molly Bloom. 

Linda Chen/GPB News

It's been just over a year since Fulton County Superior Court Judge Jerry Baxter delivered guilty verdicts to eleven educators in the Atlanta Public Schools cheating trial. The trial lasted eight months, the longest in the state's history. The appeals process is set to begin later this year. 

But first, thousands of pages of testimony need to be transcribed. That task falls to court reporter Evelyn Parker. Each day she relives every moment, every word of the APS trial. 

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Imagine escaping from prison and being on the run for nearly 50 years, only to be recaptured.  That’s the story of Robert Stackowitz. He escaped from a Georgia prison in 1968, and was just recently found by authorities to be living Connecticut. His  attorney Norm Pattis says Stackowitz is fully rehabilitated and in poor health, and shouldn’t return to prison. We talk with Pattis about the case.

Although 2015 was a fantastic year for women’s athletics, one of the oldest women’s professional sports leagues is struggling to stay relevant. The WNBA has seen declines in both game attendance and TV ratings from the previous year, which prompted the decision to find a new face for the association. Atlanta native Lisa Borders oversees the WNBA, and talks about what she hopes to accomplish for women’s athletics during her tenure.  Then, the Atlanta Braves are currently one of the worst teams in baseball with a paltry 9-28 record so far this season.

The National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial anniversary this year. One of Georgia’s most notable parks is found at Kennesaw Mountain, a site that hosted a volatile struggle during the Civil War. Historian and researcher Brad Quinlin discovered that a large number of former slaves participated in the battle; some even lost their lives in the conflict. We talk with Quinlin about the Battle of Kennesaw and the personal stories that make this event so compelling.

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The National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial anniversary this year. One of Georgia’s most notable parks is found at Kennesaw Mountain, a site that hosted a volatile struggle during the Civil War. Historian and researcher Brad Quinlin discovered that a large number of former slaves participated in the battle; many even lost their lives in the conflict.

We talk with Quinlin about the Battle of Kennesaw and the personal stories that make this struggle so compelling. 

Take a look at the full documentary, along with a panel discussion, below:

The Sound of Shaky Knees

May 16, 2016
Linda Chen/GPB News

The 2016 Shaky Knees Music Festival brought big names in music to Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta. Headliners included Jane's Addiction, Florence + The Machine, and My Morning Jacket as well as acts with strong Georgia connections like Baroness and Phosphorescent. 

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The Democratic Party has evolved and been molded over generations. Bates College lecturer Christopher Petrella says one photograph of Bill Clinton campaigning for president at Stone Mountain in Georgia paints a narrative of the Democratic Party’s history of discrimination.

The quality of restaurant service may not be the only factor that contributes to how much someone tips. Research suggests there may be disparities in tipping based on the race of the consumer. Wayne State University professor Zach Brewster says black people tend to tip less than white people. He talks with us about the findings and what race, culture and geography have to do with gratuity. 

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One restaurant chain made a sincere attempt at revolutionizing the customer experience last year. Joe's Crab Shack became the nation's first large restaurant chain to start a no-tip policy, but it backed away from that model earlier this month.

To mark Friday the 13th, we’re taking a look at conspiracy theories that have come out of Georgia. From the  Altamaha-ha monster to the Georgia Guidestones, Savannah  tour guide Shannon Scott breaks down  some of the tallest tales to come out of the Peach State. 

On Second Thought For Friday, May 13, 2016

May 13, 2016

To mark Friday the 13th, we’re taking a look at conspiracy theories that have come out of Georgia. From the Altamahaha monster to the Georgia Guidestones, Savannah ghost tour guide Shannon Scott breaks down  some of the tallest tales to come out of the Peach State. 

The Breakroom assembles to discuss the week’s news, including headlines about terrorist math problems, reverse suspension in school, and if a Texas high school football team needs a quarter billion dollar stadium. 

We also chat about the chronic lateness of singer Lauryn Hill, head injuries in the sport of cheerleading, and the punishment in France for taking risqué baby pictures. 

Our Breakroom this week is:

The latest Marvel movie, “Captain America: Civil War,”  is a huge winner at the box office, boasting the fifth biggest box office release in history. The blockbuster hit included many scenes filmed in Georgia, which continues the trend of big budget movies choosing to film in the state. We ask Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Jennifer Brett about the success of "Civil War" and find out if more superheroes will soon be seen around the state. Plus, before it became a live-action film, the comic version of Marvel’s "Civil War" storyline was released over a decade ago.

Ted Cruz and John Kasich dropped out of the Presidential race last week, leaving Donald Trump as the Republican Party’s presumptive nominee. But his candidacy doesn’t have the widespread support of the GOP. We check in with Republicans from around the state who vowed to never vote Trump about their options now. Our guests include author Demetrius Minor and conservative talk show host Greg Williams.

Kyle Christy / IFC

Savannah native Scott Aukerman is the creator and host of the TV series and podcast, "Comedy Bang Bang."  The show blends conversation with music, skits and celebrity impersonations.

Every year, thousands of birds make their way to Georgia’s coastline during their migration. One vital resting place for these birds is the estuary found at the mouth of the Altamaha River, where they eat and recover en route to their final destination. One species called the red knot heavily depends on Georgia’s coast to help complete its 19,000 mile journey. The red knot is the subject of Deborah Cramer’s most recent book, "The Narrow Edge." We speak with the author about the red knot and what makes the Georgia coast an important ecological destination.

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Atlanta almost celebrated a historic event last November. A massive Nobel Peace summit was planned in the city.  The event included heads of state and Nobel Laureates like President Obama, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, and activist Malala Yousafzai. But after millions of dollars raised, plans for the summit fell through.

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GPB Savannah’s Emily Jones spends her Sunday nights like a lot of people: watching the HBO series “Game of Thrones.”  Jones has stuck with the show, even as she has harsh critiques for its misogynistic treatment of female characters.  In this commentary, she tells us why this bothers her almost more than mistreatment of women in the real patriarchal world. 

The social media movement, #OscarsSoWhite, opened up many people’s eyes to the lack of diversity in the film industry. In order to address this issue from a state level, Georgia recently passed HB 1577, an initiative geared towards creating more diversity in the entertainment industry. Actress and director Terri Vaughn helped spearhead this legislation in conjunction with her production company, Nina Holliday Entertainment. She joins us to talk about the importance of this issue and to discuss her upcoming directorial debut, “#DigitalLivesMatter.” 

terrijvaughn.com

The social media movement, #OscarsSoWhite, opened up many people’s eyes to the lack of diversity in the film industry. In order to address this issue from a state level, Georgia recently passed HB 1577. Actress and director Terri J. Vaughn helped spearhead this legislation in conjunction with her production company, Nina Holiday Entertainment. 

An Atlanta composer has a new work that features the last words of unarmed black men killed by authority figures. We talk with Joel Thompson, whose piece, “The Seven Last Words of the Unarmed,” is being performed by students at the University of Michigan. 

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You can see dances like "The Dougie" and the "Nae Nae" in Youtube videos from all over the world. But many of these moves have their roots in hip-hop in the South. We look at the intersection of hip hop and dance and why one writer thinks Atlanta is the Capital of Viral Dance. 

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The Breakroom gang joins host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news. Our panel this week includes people who all work in agriculture. We have Andrew Thompson of Dixie, Matthew Raiford of Brunswick, Haylene Green of Atlanta, and Whit Whitmire of Atlanta.

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