News

News

Professor Raymond Gavins passed away last week, at the age of 77,  leaving behind a powerful legacy from his time as a historian at Duke University. The Atlanta native helped build an audio treasure trove of previously unheard African-American voices from the era of legalized segregation.  The collection is known as the "Behind the Veil Project."

We take a moment to eulogize Gavins and remember the arduous journey he took in order to better his fellow man. 

Medical errors are now the third leading cause of death in the U.S. Why? We talk with a pair of experts about new research that points to what goes wrong during patient treatment and ask if the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should be involved in raising awareness about this as a public health issue.

Gucci Mane No Longer Behind Bars

May 31, 2016
YouTube

Atlanta rapper Gucci Mane is almost as known for his run-ins with the law as he is for his raw, Southern-fried lyrics. He was recently released from prison after serving almost three years, but incarceration didn’t do much to curb his creative drive. From behind bars, he released more than a dozen new albums, a movie, and an autobiography is in the works. 

We speak with Atlanta hip-hop artist Makonnen and hip-hop scholar Regina Bradley about Gucci Mane’s influence on hip-hop in the South.

NOAA National Hurricane Center

A tropical storm off the Southeastern coast caused flooding in several Savannah streets Memorial Day weekend.

 

The National Weather Service is encouraging residents to remain well guarded against flood areas and seek alternate routes. Officials say never attempt to drive through standing water.

 

The Breakroom gang joins guest host Adam Ragusea to weigh in on the week's news.

Guest host Adam Ragusea revisits a conversation about white nose syndrome, the deadly fungal disease that has rapidly reduced Georgia's bat population. We discuss the effects on the state's vulnerable agriculture industry.

 

Then, we add to our ever-growing, essential Georgia Playlist with help from singer Chandra Currelley. This weekend, she will perform at the Atlanta Jazz Festival.

GPB

Marvel Comics dropped a bombshell this week about one of its most popular characters, Captain America. The passionate reaction to the news shows what a close connection fans can feel to comic book characters.  This weekend, that connection will be celebrated at the annual MomoCon convention in Atlanta.  We talk with Atlanta comic book artist Dexter Vines, who’s one of the event's featured speakers.

 

 

The big game returns to Georgia! Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank and civil rights leader Andrew Young made a successful pitch to host the Super Bowl in Atlanta in 2019. That new stadium didn't hurt the bid much either.

Courtesy of the Atlanta Jazz Festival

Twenty years ago, Atlanta singer and songwriter Joi transcended the traditional sounds of R&B with the release of her debut album, “The Pendulum Vibe.” She’s now considered as one of the originators of the neo-soul music movement and has collaborated with artists like OutKast and Goodie Mob. She returns home this week to headline the Atlanta Jazz Festival on Friday night.

We speak with Joi about her music and how the Atlanta music scene has changed. 

alist / flickr

Many air travelers are experiencing long lines and headaches as extreme delays continue at airport security checkpoints across the country. Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed told reporters this week that he doesn't want Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport to become a poster child for stalled traveler traffic. 

Our country is growing ever grayer as baby boomers age in large numbers. A massive study at Emory University that takes an in-depth look at the aging process is underway. Emory hopes to bring together 100,000 people to study physical and mental health, sickness, and other factors that affect the elderly. We sit down with university researcher Michele Marcus to learn a little bit more about the study and what they hope to uncover.  

wikipedia.org

Our country is growing ever grayer as the baby boomers age in large numbers. A massive study at Emory University that takes an in-depth look at the aging process is underway. Emory hopes to bring together 100,000 people to study physical and mental health, sickness, and other factors that affect the elderly.  We sit down with university researcher Michele Marcus to learn a little bit more about the study and what they hope to uncover. 

Come this December, millions of American workers will be eligible for overtime pay. That's because of a new policy finalized by the Labor Department. In our regular series, “Break It Down,” we talk about the history of the 40-hour work week. Then, Wall Street Journal reporter Melanie Trottman discusses how the new overtime protections work and who’s covered by them.

Waffle House

Come this December, millions of American workers will be eligible for overtime pay. That's because of a new policy finalized by the Labor Department. In our regular series, “Break It Down,” we talk about the history of the 40-hour work week. Then, Wall Street Journal reporter Melanie Trottman discusses how the new overtime protections work and who’s covered by them.

Wiki Commons

A poll by the evangelical firm Barna Group found Christians who regularly attend church, and those who don’t, have very different feelings when it comes to presidential candidate Donald Trump. More than a third of churchgoers hold unfavorable opinions of the de facto Republican nominee while other Republicans who identify as Christian generally like him.

First, we speak with Anthony Mackie, who is currently lighting up the silver screen as Falcon in “Captain America: Civil War.” Mackie’s next role is a completely different heroic challenge. He plays Martin Luther King Jr. in the upcoming HBO film, “All the Way.” Bryan Cranston will star alongside Mackie in the role of Lyndon B. Johnson. The story introduces the two political figures at the height of the Civil Rights movement in a country torn apart by the assassination of John F. Kennedy.

Olivia Reingold/GPB News

The Breakroom comes together to discuss the week’s news, including tuition for sports and whether the viewing habits of our politicians matter.

Joining us for The Breakroom:

  • Greg Williams, host of the conservative radio show "Greg’s List"
  • Bee Nguyen, Executive Director of Athena’s Warehouse
  • Roxanne Donovan, Associate Professor of Psychology and Interdisciplinary Studies at Kennesaw State University
  • Chuck Reece, Editor of the Bitter Southerner 

wikipedia.org

The nationwide debate concerning transgender bathroom access has finally made its way to Georgia. A policy issued from the White House states that school systems that deny transgender youths access to the facilities of their choice could lose federal aid as a result.

We chat with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Eric Stirgus about the mandate and what effect it may have on Georgia schools.

Some were sentenced to prison. Some to jail. Others to home confinement. But many of the eleven Atlanta Public Schools educators who were convicted of racketeering in a cheating scandal last year can now return to the classroom. We learn more from Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Molly Bloom. Plus, the Atlanta Public Schools cheating trial was the longest in the state’s history. The appeals process is set to begin later this year. But before that can happen, transcripts of months of testimony need to be completed. That task falls to court reporter Evelyn Parker.

Kent D. Johnson / Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP, Pool, File

Many of the 11 Atlanta Public Schools educators who were convicted of racketeering in a cheating scandal last year can now return to the classroom. We learn more from Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Molly Bloom. 

Linda Chen/GPB News

It's been just over a year since Fulton County Superior Court Judge Jerry Baxter delivered guilty verdicts to eleven educators in the Atlanta Public Schools cheating trial. The trial lasted eight months, the longest in the state's history. The appeals process is set to begin later this year. 

But first, thousands of pages of testimony need to be transcribed. That task falls to court reporter Evelyn Parker. Each day she relives every moment, every word of the APS trial. 

Department of Corrections

Imagine escaping from prison and being on the run for nearly 50 years, only to be recaptured.  That’s the story of Robert Stackowitz. He escaped from a Georgia prison in 1968, and was just recently found by authorities to be living Connecticut. His  attorney Norm Pattis says Stackowitz is fully rehabilitated and in poor health, and shouldn’t return to prison. We talk with Pattis about the case.

Although 2015 was a fantastic year for women’s athletics, one of the oldest women’s professional sports leagues is struggling to stay relevant. The WNBA has seen declines in both game attendance and TV ratings from the previous year, which prompted the decision to find a new face for the association. Atlanta native Lisa Borders oversees the WNBA, and talks about what she hopes to accomplish for women’s athletics during her tenure.  Then, the Atlanta Braves are currently one of the worst teams in baseball with a paltry 9-28 record so far this season.

The National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial anniversary this year. One of Georgia’s most notable parks is found at Kennesaw Mountain, a site that hosted a volatile struggle during the Civil War. Historian and researcher Brad Quinlin discovered that a large number of former slaves participated in the battle; some even lost their lives in the conflict. We talk with Quinlin about the Battle of Kennesaw and the personal stories that make this event so compelling.

Taylor Gantt

The National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial anniversary this year. One of Georgia’s most notable parks is found at Kennesaw Mountain, a site that hosted a volatile struggle during the Civil War. Historian and researcher Brad Quinlin discovered that a large number of former slaves participated in the battle; many even lost their lives in the conflict.

We talk with Quinlin about the Battle of Kennesaw and the personal stories that make this struggle so compelling. 

Take a look at the full documentary, along with a panel discussion, below:

The Sound of Shaky Knees

May 16, 2016
Linda Chen/GPB News

The 2016 Shaky Knees Music Festival brought big names in music to Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta. Headliners included Jane's Addiction, Florence + The Machine, and My Morning Jacket as well as acts with strong Georgia connections like Baroness and Phosphorescent. 

Wikimedia Commons

The Democratic Party has evolved and been molded over generations. Bates College lecturer Christopher Petrella says one photograph of Bill Clinton campaigning for president at Stone Mountain in Georgia paints a narrative of the Democratic Party’s history of discrimination.

The quality of restaurant service may not be the only factor that contributes to how much someone tips. Research suggests there may be disparities in tipping based on the race of the consumer. Wayne State University professor Zach Brewster says black people tend to tip less than white people. He talks with us about the findings and what race, culture and geography have to do with gratuity. 

Wikimedia Commons

One restaurant chain made a sincere attempt at revolutionizing the customer experience last year. Joe's Crab Shack became the nation's first large restaurant chain to start a no-tip policy, but it backed away from that model earlier this month.

To mark Friday the 13th, we’re taking a look at conspiracy theories that have come out of Georgia. From the  Altamaha-ha monster to the Georgia Guidestones, Savannah  tour guide Shannon Scott breaks down  some of the tallest tales to come out of the Peach State. 

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