voting

The deadline to register to vote in Georgia is Tuesday, Oct. 9.
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The midterm elections are 42 days away and Tuesday, National Voter Registration Day, serves as a timely reminder to submit your registration information to be eligible to participate in the November contest. 

If you haven't registered to vote yet, you still have two weeks before the Tuesday, October 9 deadline. 

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With American politics more polarized than ever, most Americans have at least one thing in common going into midterms: they tend to stay home on Election Day. In fact, as NPR political reporter Asma Khalid has found, midterm elections have not drawn a majority of voters to the polls since the early 1900s. She set out to find out why.


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Stephanie McClure, a professor of sociology at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville, had a simple plan.

She and other members of the Middle Georgia Progressive Women activist group would head out to a Baldwin County High School football game with a stack of voter registration forms and sign people up. But when a friend went to the office of the Baldwin County Registrar to pick up the forms, they hit a road block. The forms asked for proof of residency, such as a photo ID, to register.

  

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On this edition of Political Rewind, a guilty plea in New York, a conviction in Virginia and a sentencing in Augusta. How will Georgia representatives and candidates for Governor react to the news? 


One day after the group Georgians for the Impeachment of Donald Trump paid to have a billboard put up along St. Augustine Road in Valdosta, the Impeach Trump sign was taken down, according to the group's Facebook page
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On this edition of Political Rewind, two political controversies have plagued South Georgia.

The anger over a proposal to close most of the polling places in Randolph County is making national headlines and sparking continued allegations of voter suppression. Meanwhile, in Valdosta, a billboard advertising an 'Impeach Trump’ website survives just 24 hours before community pressure forces it down.


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If you know Lindsay Holliday, you know he’s serious about his politics.

Holliday, who most people in Macon know as “Doc,” was once a fixture at Macon City Council meetings where he made good use of the public comment periods. He has run for office. To call him politically active is an understatement.

“I'm an activist. I'm definitely an activist and I'm ready to get active about this,” he said during a recent break at his Macon dentistry practice.

By this, Holliday meant the letter he got in the mail about a week after the second round of Georgia primary voting this year.


Georgia State Capitol
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On this edition of Political Rewind, a special election for Ohio’s 12th Congressional District was “too close to call” on Tuesday night. Vying for a congressional seat that has been held by a Republican for three decades, Trump-backed Republican Troy Balderson and Democrat Danny O'Connor have put GOP congressional campaigns across the country on alert. 


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What makes a Millennial? A recent Pew Research Center study says it's anyone born from 1982-2000. But "Millennial" also means viewing climate change and conflict as the most critical issues, according to the most recent World Economic Forum Global Shapers Survey.


 

Georgia Attorney General Quits Defense In Server Wiping Case

Nov 2, 2017
Alex Sanz / AP Photo

The Georgia attorney general's office will no longer represent the state's top elections official in an elections integrity lawsuit filed three days before a crucial computer server was quietly wiped clean.

The lawsuit aims to force Georgia to retire its antiquated and heavily questioned touchscreen election technology, which does not provide an auditable paper trail.

Black Georgia Lawmakers Blast Trump Panel On Voting Fraud

Jul 6, 2017
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Black lawmakers in Georgia blasted President Donald Trump's election fraud commission for requesting extensive personal voter information Thursday, accusing the administration of trying to scare people away from voting.

Members of Georgia's Legislative Black Caucus, all Democrats in the General Assembly, said there's no logical reason the federal government would ask states for the information. They said releasing it would violate voters' privacy.

Alex Sanz / AP Photo/File

Georgia's electronic touchscreen voting system is so riddled with problems that the results of the most expensive House race in U.S. history should be tossed out and a new election held, according to a lawsuit filed by a government watchdog group and six Georgia voters.

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The whole Georgia voting process has come under scrutiny in recent years. The Daily Yonder, a news website, compared investigations into voting violations in rural and urban areas of the state. We talked with reporter Tim Marema, who found rural voters undergo a disproportionate share of state elections boards investigations.

Vice President Pence has yet to begin a promised investigation into allegations by President Trump that millions of people voted illegally in November. But that hasn't stopped state lawmakers from taking action they say would limit voter fraud, even though the president's claims have been widely discredited.

Legislation to tighten voter ID and other requirements has already been introduced in about half the states this year. And in statehouse after statehouse, the debate has had a familiar ring.

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They're a badge of honor on Election Day: those stickers that declare to the world "I voted." Nationally, their origin is a bit hazy, with several people and groups claiming credit for the concept.

Georgia's peach sticker is considered to be one of the best in the country. We find out how the idea grew with help from Candice Broce, press secretary for Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp.  

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Joel McLendon / flickr

With a week to go until Election Day, more than a million early ballots have been cast in Georgia. There are many Georgians who are voting for the first time, but some residents say the nastiness of the presidential race has tainted the experience.  

 

Come next Tuesday, millions of people will stand in line to vote; last presidential cycle, about 57.5 percent of eligible voters cast ballots. Still, that means nearly half did not. Many people stay away from the polls because they run out of time, or have a work conflict — in which case lacking paid time off to vote might be a factor.

Paid leave to vote is covered by a patchwork of laws around the country.

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Vote flipping. The stories and conspiracy theories have begun.

In every recent election, there have been reports of voters pressing one candidate's name on a touch-screen machine, only to have the opponent's name light up instead.

It can be unnerving for voters and often leads to allegations that the machines have been "rigged" to favor one candidate over another.

This year's presidential election will be the first in a half-century without the significant presence of federal observers at polling places. That's because in 2013 the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, and when the court wiped out that section, the statute that provided for election observers went, too.

At a hearing last month on the possible hacking of voting machines, Louisiana Secretary of State Tom Schedler said he was more worried about something else. The real threat on Election Day, said Schedler, is violence at the polls.

On Election Day this November, about 1 in 4 Americans will vote using a device that never lets the voter see a copy of his or her vote on paper.

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For most Americans, Election Day is November 8. Though starting today, voters in the key swing state of Iowa can cast their ballots. Iowa is one of many states providing the option of voting early.

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A federal lawsuit claims Georgia's voter registration process violates the Voting Rights Act and has prevented tens of thousands of people from being able to register to vote — many of them minorities.

The lawsuit filed Wednesday in Gainesville says a state policy causes voter registration applications to be rejected if the submitted information doesn't exactly match that in databases maintained by the Georgia Department of Driver Services or the Social Security Administration.

The upcoming presidential election will mark a surprising first. Yes, a woman will be on the ballot as a major party nominee. But in addition, for the first time ever, the Organization of American States is sending poll observers to watch as U.S. voting takes place.

The OAS, based in Washington, D.C., has previously observed elections in 26 of its 34 member nations, but never before in the United States. The mission will be led by former Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla.

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