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July fifth 2018 marks the fourth anniversary of  "Two Way Street." To celebrate that milestone, we're revisiting one of our favorite conversations: an interview with Diana Nyad, the strong-willed swimmer who was the first to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage. 

She completed the feat, which many thought was impossible, at the remarkable age of 66. 


Bethesda Academy on Facebook

The Fourth of July is over, but the fun continues on the Georgia coast. Marcia Banes of Old Savannah Tours and Marianne Ganem Poppell of Savannah Master Calendar have some tips.

Marianne's picks:

Today we celebrate America’s independence from British rule. To get a sense of the role Georgia played in the struggle for liberty, we spoke with Stan Deaton, senior historian for the Georgia Historical Society. He takes us back to the time of the American Revolution, to the colony of Georgia’s first capitol in Savannah.

To learn more about the Georgians involved in the founding of the country, Deaton suggests checking out the Georgia Department of Humanities' New Georgia Encyclopdedia online.

Joe Cook

Several hundred paddlers spent seven days and nights paddling down a Georgia river in hopes of raising awareness to the importance of maintaining river health. 

The last day of Paddle Georgia 2018 started in Juliette and ended at Amerson Park in Macon. The 11-mile stretch was a final ode to the carefree, adventurous trek down the rivers where paddlers of all ages took to the water to kayak, canoe and surf the rapids for the weeklong event.


forrestpark.org

Forest Park City Council on Monday voted 3-2 for decriminalization of marijuana, officials said, making it the sixth city in Georgia to do so. 

Now, people possessing less than an ounce of marijuana face a ticket as opposed to arrest.

First time offenders will be charged $100 and a $300 fine is attached for a repeat offence, but because the offence is no longer a misdemeanor no one faces jail time. Or a criminal record that could affect student loan eligibility or job prospects.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

What is there was a primary runoff election and no one voted?  Early voting for the July 24th election starts today, but candidates vying for a spot in the general election worry voters won’t show up to cast ballots. 

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Protesters of the Trump administration's policy of detaining families and separating children from parents who enter the Unites States illegally are gathering Saturday in cities across Georgia.

Athens, Atlanta, Augusta, Brunswick, Dalton, Lawrenceville, Lumpkin, Savannah and Valdosta will be represented, according to the official website.


(AP Photos, John Amis and Todd Kirkland, File)

Early voting in the Republican runoff for governor starts Monday and a new poll shows Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp neck and neck among GOP voters.   


Peoria, Arizona, Police Department

Savannah has named Roy Minter as the city's next police chief, City Manager Rob Hernandez said Thursday. 

Minter is currently the police chief in Peoria, Arizona, where he announced his retirement in May. 

Hernandez said Minter's past experience will translate well to Savannah. 

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Savannah-Chatham Police Chief Addresses Departure, De-merger

Fort McAllister State Historic Park on Facebook

We're headed into a hot summer weekend and the Fourth of July, with plenty of events to keep you entertained in and around Savannah. Joshua Peacock of the Savannah Morning News and Claire Sandow of the Tourism Leadership Council have some tips.


GPB News

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” Tom Johnson shares stories about his life and career in journalism.

We’re revisiting this conversation — and other favorites — as part of our “Two Way Street” anniversary celebration. To kick off our fifth year, we’re listening again to the shows that we can’t let go: the conversations that challenged us, surprised us and have stuck with us all these years. This show originally aired on January 14, 2017.


(AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser, File)

From GPB News, this is Political Rewind.  Today, a long-awaited decision from the United States Supreme Court in Florida’s fight with Georgia over water rights from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.  We’ll discuss what happens next in the fight. 


HDS Community Garden / Flickr

In one way or another, access to green space — or lack thereof — affects all 10 million Georgians. Around the state, communities are looking for ways to help everyone get outside and lead healthier lives. In Macon, there’s Georgia’s first urban agrihood. In Savannah, there’s a campaign underway to make bicycles more accessible and safe roadways more available. And in Athens, a network of community gardens and farmers markets helps educate and empower everyone from school children to seniors.

 


(AP Photo/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re one month away from the runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp to decide the Republican nominee for governor.  What is Casey Cagle saying on the campaign trail to connect himself to the most popular Republican in the state?


Emily Jones / GPB News

Savannah has a new landscaping crew, made up of goats. It's an increasingly popular way to clear vegetation.


(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump may have signed an order keeping immigrant families arrested at the border together, but it’s his comments this morning about pending immigration legislation that some say just threw GOP members of Congress under the bus. 


AP Photo

Johnny Mercer grew up in Savannah and went on to write some of the most popular love songs of the 20th century. You may not know his name, but you certainly know his music, which includes "Something’s Gotta Give," "Moon River," and "Autumn Leaves." Between 1929 and 1976, Mercer wrote the lyrics—and in some cases the music too—to some 1,400 songs.

We explore the life and music of Johnny Mercer with Georgia State University archivist Kevin Fleming. Georgia State is the repository for Johnny Mercer’s papers as well as a vast collection of other materials related to his life and career.


Joel Meyerowitz / Courtesy of the artist and Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Summer is officially here, and there's plenty to do this weekend in Savannah. Visit Savannah's Shannon Lowery has some tips.

Shannon's picks:

(AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal announces a first step to build new transit in metro Atlanta, a huge project along Georgia 400.  Is the state on track to tackle the region’s traffic headaches?


Georgia Climate Project

A coalition from across the state has put together what they’re calling the Georgia Climate Research Roadmap: a list of 40 questions on how climate change will affect the state and how to respond.

 

Patricia Yager of the University of Georgia is on the steering committee that developed the list. GPB’s Emily Jones reports.


Immigration Showdown In Washington

Jun 18, 2018
(U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, immigration takes center stage in Washington this week.  Outrage over the Department of Justice policy of separating children from parents at the border is growing and it’s spreading across partisan lines. 


Today: Georgia's U.S. Senators go their separate ways over President Trump's tariffs. Johnny Isakson wants Congress to approve them while David Perdue says the President has the power to act on his own. We'll look at that split, and at Perdue's apparent unwavering loyalty to the Trump agenda. 


Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, GA

Savannah businessman Charles Lamar on Nov. 28, 1858, became the first person in 40 years to land a slave ship on American soil.

That event is the subject of Jim Jordan’s new book, “The Slave-Trader’s Letter-Book: Charles Lamer, the Wanderer, and other Tales of the African Slave Trade.”

Jordan was able to reconstruct the story because he got his hands on valuable research material — Charles Lamar’s own letters, which most historians didn’t even believe existed.   


Ships of the Sea Museum on Facebook

There's a little something for everyone in Savannah this weekend. Connect Savannah's Anna Chandler has some suggestions.


Thursday, June 14, 2018, is the last day for people to comment on Camden County’s plans to launch rockets off Georgia’s coast. 

The County wants to build a launch site for small and medium-size rockets.


Matt Harriger / Flickr

According the United States Census Bureau, there are nearly 50,000 homeless veterans in America. In order to combat these issues with housing, popular TV shows like “Tiny House Hunters” are looking to create tiny homes as a solution.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District (licensed via Creative Commons)

The Army Corps of Engineers this week announced additional funding for the expansion of the Savannah harbor, bringing this year’s total to about $85 million. Officials say the money will keep the project on schedule.


AP Photo/John Amis

GOP gubernatorial candidate under fire for a secret recording, in which he admits he used legislation to undermine a primary opponent. And why did former rival Clay Tippins record and leak the tape? Our panel has answers.


GPB Morning Headlines For Monday, June 11, 2018

Jun 11, 2018


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Who is Atticus Finch really—an arch-segregationist or a champion of justice? And how do we go about answering that question when going straight to the source isn’t an option?


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