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The Breakroom gang has a lot of news to cover this week. We’ll talk about Oprah’s impassioned Golden Globes speech, why more college students are finding sugar daddies, and what UGA’s big loss means for Georgia football fans. We also look at the rising popularity of cassette tapes, wonder if cash is going out of style, and ask if kids are spending too much time on smart phones. Joining us in the Breakroom are Natalie Pawelski, Charles Richardson, Sam Burnham, and Amber Scott.

For years, print publications have been struggling to stay afloat in a digital world. Recently, that uphill battle hit Atlanta’s alternative magazines. Creative Loafing announced last month it would cut its staff, after transitioning from weekly to monthly earlier in the year. We talk about the role of alternative magazines with Keith Herndon, Professor of Journalism at the University of Georgia. He is also author of the book, ‘The Decline of the Daily Newspaper.’

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we are at the Georgia State Capitol for Governor Nathan Deal’s final State of the State address.  What are his plans for restoring economic vitality to rural Georgia communities?  What about expanded transit in metro Atlanta?  How will he cap his progressive reforms in the criminal justice system?  And, what does he see as his legacy accomplishments?  Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle, House Speaker David Ralston and others stop by to react to the speech.

Panelists:

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump visits Atlanta for the college football national championship game.  What plans do protestors have to make their voices heard?  Also, the Georgia Legislature is back in session.  Will lawmakers steer clear of hot button issues as they prepare to face elections later this year?  And, there are new plans to rebrand the state’s most prominent tribute to the Confederacy.

Panelists:

AJC Political Reporter Jim Galloway

Democratic Consultant Tharon Johnson

AP Photo/Tannen Maury

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re discussing a bill set to be debated in the state legislature that would establish a hate crimes law in Georgia.  We’re one of just a handful of states without one.  Then, Attorney General Jeff Sessions opens the door for a federal crackdown on legal marijuana.  What impact could it have on our medical pot statute?  The White House is now in full battle mode against a sensational new book that alleges Trump’s closest allies think he’s not fit to be president.

Panelists:

(Bill Ingalls/NASA via AP)

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” Bill talks to astronaut Scott Kelly, who holds the American record for most consecutive days in space.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we ring in the new year with a look at the major events we’ll be following through 2018.  Georgians will elect a new governor while Republicans are banking on the fact that the state remains deeply red and will continue GOP dominance under the “Gold Dome”.  Democrats say they’ll put that presumption to a serious test. Oh, and President Trump starts the new year with yet another tweet storm.

Panelists:

GaPundit.com Owner and Editor Todd Rehm

Former Pollster Beth Shapiro

On this special edition of Political Rewind, we look back at the year in politics. From new leadership in Atlanta to the fight for a new governor of Georgia and an expensive fight for a congressional seat. There was also President Trump, tax reform, health care reform, the Mueller Russia investigation, the resignation of one Georgian from the president’s cabinet and the firing of another, plus the #MeToo movement that sent tremors through Washington. All were big stories in 2017, but which ranked as the biggest according to our panel?

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With New Year's right around the corner, we're re-airing our conversation with Ambassador Andrew Young in the spirit of self-reinvention. We hope that Young, a man who has been working on himself for his entire life, will inspire you as you write your New Year's resolutions. 

On this special edition of Political Rewind, Khizr Khan joins us. When Khan pulled a copy of the U.S. Constitution out of his pocket and offered it to Donald Trump at last year’s Democratic Convention, he found himself thrust overnight in the national spotlight.

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on the short-form improvisational comedy show "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. We talked with him about his craft.

The Georgia film industry is big business - $9.5 billion big in 2017. We spent the hour meeting the people who work on film and television projects that are produced in the state

 

“My Cousin Vinny” premiered 25 years ago to critical and popular acclaim. Filmed mostly in Monticello, Georgia, it tells the story of an inexperienced New York attorney who takes on the biggest case of his career --- a murder trial. We looked back on the film’s legacy with its director, Jonathan Lynn.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will continue to pay for an expansion of the Plant Vogtle nuclear power facility, thanks to a ruling by the Public Service Commission. Our panel will weigh in on how much we’ll pay and look at why the decision has sparked controversy. Plus, state legislators are considering a new tax on phones, television subscriptions and streaming services like Netflix. We’ll discuss the reasons. And, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.

Host Bill Nigut reads one of the most beloved of all holiday stories: Truman Capote’s “A Christmas Memory.” In this heart-warming memoir, Capote recounts the Christmases he spent with an elderly, distant cousin when he was a young boy living in Monroeville, Alabama.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Georgia Power’s expansion of nuclear power at Plant Vogtle is still alive following a unanimous vote by the state’s Public Service Commission.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the Public Service Commission is about to make a momentous decision that will hit Georgia Power customers in the pocketbook and influence the future of nuclear power across the country. Will the PSC uphold Georgia Power’s plan to continue construction of the troubled Plant Vogtle? Will the commission approve a power company proposal to increase the surcharge customers are already paying for building the nuclear plant? Plus, we’ll look at the fallout from the blackout at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.

Georgia educators are filing a class-action lawsuit against the state over retirement benefits. The state Department of Community Health changed a law in 2012, effectively reducing the subsidies of any retirees who were in the school system for less than five years. We talk about the controversy with James Salzer, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

#MeToo is not only a movement about sexual harassment. It’s a reckoning for the way we work, and a call to change the power dynamics leading to sexual abuse. We talk with people who dedicate, in different ways, their professional lives to understanding toxic work environments and how to dismantle them. Erica Clemmons is the Georgia State Director for 9 to 5; Marie Mitchell is a professor of management at the University of Georgia’s business school; and Joey Price is the CEO of Jumpstart HR, a human resources consulting firm based in Baltimore.

AP Photo/John Bazemore

On this edition of Political Rewind: Georgia political leaders are examining the results of the Alabama senate race to determine whether there are lessons for how to run in 2018 races here. Our panel will look at what Alabama may teach us about elections next year.

The list of nicknames and titles for filmmaker John Waters is long and legend. Waters is more than a filmmaker. He’s an actor, writer, fashion icon, stand-up comedian and art collector. He performs in Atlanta on Friday with his one-man show, “A John Waters Christmas.” We get his take on the holiday season.

Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

On today's episode of “Two Way Street,” we talk to Sugarland artist Kristian Bush. He and his musical partner, Jennifer Nettles, have been on hiatus since 2013 but recently announced that they will be getting back together for a 2018 tour. We talk to him about Sugarland’s long-anticipated reunion, but since this is a holiday show, we start by talking to Kristian about his passion for Christmas music.

On this edition of "Political Rewind," as the 2018 Georgia legislative session approaches, we’re joined by Speaker of the House of Representatives David Ralston. What does he see as the most compelling issues legislators will face? What about a plan to deal with sexual harassment under the Gold Dome? Will the speaker once again look to tamp down efforts to pass a religious liberty bill? And, what about the calls for the legislature to relinquish control over the fate of Confederate markers in local communities?

Panelists:

Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s a city inside the City of Macon.

It’s made of tents strung along the banks of the Ocmulgee River downtown. Homeless people have been bedding down here, largely hidden from view, for years.

But this year, with the movement of people back to the nation’s downtown centers happening alongside the first increase in the nation’s homeless population in seven years, Macon-Bibb government says the tent city has to be pushed back, at least from inside Macon’s Central City Park.

Brynn Anderson / AP Photo/File

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the Alabama Senate race heads to the finish line, President Trump rallies voters to turn out for Roy Moore, while former President Obama, along with other key African-American leaders, rally in support of Doug Jones. Meanwhile, Alabama business leaders worry the election results could be yet another setback for the state’s efforts to compete with Georgia.

The Trump Administration’s immigration crackdown has led to an uptick in arrests nationwide. New federal data show arrests in Georgia and the Carolinas are also up from the last fiscal year. The president’s push to be tough on illegal immigration also includes policies to build a massive wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. Historian Kenneth C. Davis explains that anti-immigrant sentiment is older than America itself.

J. Scott Applewhite / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, two prominent Georgians push back against President Trump: FBI Director Chris Wray defends the honor of his agency in response to Trump's Twitter attacks, and Congressman John Lewis says he won't attend the opening of a Mississippi civil rights museum if Donald Trump shows up. Plus, will Al Franken's resignation from the U.S. Senate put more pressure on Republicans to speak out against those in their own party accused of sexual harassment? Georgia's own Newt Gingrich says no way.

Grant Blankenship / GPB


Odds are good you have never heard of Emmett Miller. Not too long ago, neither had Ben Arthur.

Why Would Someone Rob A Dollar Store?

Dec 7, 2017
Mike Mozart / Flickr/CC

If you noticed a lot of dollar store robberies over the summer, you were onto something. Here in Macon, there was a string of armed robberies at stores like Family Dollar and Dollar Tree. But why would somebody target a dollar store?

We’re commemorating the 76th anniversary of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor this week by revisiting our conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Steve Twomey. His book “Countdown to Pearl Harbor: The Twelve Days to the Attack” is out now in paperback.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Phillip Tutt talks about okra and collards with his neighbors. He’s lived in the same home on Macon, Georgia’s Bowden Street for close to 50 years. Most of that time he’s had a garden.

“Now for my turnips and things like that I don’t want to plant them before Labor Day,” he said. “But if I can get them in on Labor Day I’ll be happy. But collards I believe I set them out in August if I’m not mistaken.”

Over the years the rows of vegetables in his garden have thrived while the neighborhood around them has withered. There was a time when he would walk next door to share his peppers with neighbors and return with a basket of tomatoes.

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