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On this edition of Political Rewind, after choosing their nominee for governor, Georgia Democrats declare they are unified and energized to put Stacey Abrams in the Governor’s Mansion this fall. Meanwhile, Republicans here and in Washington are wasting no time attacking Abrams even as they face a potentially contentious gubernatorial runoff battle between Brian Kemp and Casey Cagle. Our panel weighs in on the latest news in the midterm elections. Plus, what was behind Democratic Congressman David Scott’s emotional speech in the U.S. House last week. The AJC’s Jim Galloway tells us why Scott thinks racism is behind a funding measure dropped from the Farm Bill.


(AP Photos/John Bazemore, Todd Kirkland, John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the race for governor of Georgia moves one step down the road.  Democratic voters advance Stacey Abrams to the general election in overwhelming fashion, while Republicans set the stage for a fight for the soul of their party, a runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp.  Runoffs will also determine which candidates will face GOP congressional incumbents some see as vulnerable in the fall.  Our panel of insiders break down the vote and look at what to expect as they 2018 election marches towards November.

Panelists:

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

11:20 p.m.: Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp will face each other in a July runoff for the Republican spot for governor following tonight’s primary election. The winner takes on Democrat Stacey Abrams,  who could become the first woman, and the first African American, to ever hold the top political seat in Georgia.  Cagle led the pack of GOP candidates from start to finish as results came in, while Kemp easily held off Hunter Hill for second place.  Abrams, meanwhile, stormed out to a huge lead over her opponent, Stacey Evans, and never looked back. 

Grant Blankenship/GPB

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, it’s Election Day in Georgia as voters go to the polls to make their choices in dozens of races.  Democrats will pick their nominee for governor and no matter who wins, it will be the first time ever in Georgia that a woman will lead a party’s ticket into the Fall.  Republicans may send their governor’s race to a mid-summer runoff, which means they’ll endure nine more weeks of campaigning before they can turn their attention to the winning in November.  Also, two potentially vulnerable GOP incumbent members of Congress will be eyeing the results

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Plans for a clinic that would provide abortion access drew protest in Macon. 

About 150 anti-abortion protesters sang, prayed and held sometimes medically graphic posters outside the proposed location of a Summit Medical Center clinic in downtown Macon. Summit Medical Center operates a clinic in Atlanta and another in Detroit.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, voters across Georgia go to the polls tomorrow to elect candidates in dozens of primary races.  Which Stacey will emerge as the Democratic candidate for governor?

On this edition of "Two Way Street," we sit down with four smart, well read Georgians to discuss their favorite books. This conversation picks up the discussion started by "The Great American Read," an eight-part PBS series that unpacks a diverse list of 100 books. "The Great American Read" premieres Tuesday May 22 at 8 PM on GPB. 

APC/GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Democratic candidates for governor trade sharp blows and share kind words in their only statewide televised debate.  Can we expect the same when GOP candidates meet for their debate?  Evidence suggests that’s unlikely.  Plus, we now have figures showing us just how much the race for governor has cost—almost $13 million spent by candidates on both sides, so far.  Also, will the Supreme Court’s decision on sports gambling energize the forces pushing for casinos in Georgia, and what about horserace gambling?  We’ll look at the odds.

Matthew Causey / GPB News

Students with visual impairments generally don’t look forward to getting an annual class yearbook. But thanks to an engineering professor at Mercer University, this staple of the high school experience is available at the Georgia Academy for the Blind in Macon.

Professor Sinjae Hyun last Wednesday presented seven graduating seniors with the first 3D yearbook ever created. The project is the first of its kind in the world, Hyun said.

“I searched, I Googled it — touch 3D, touchable yearbook, yearbook for blind — There’s nothing there,” Hyun said.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, with Georgia primary elections just one week away, the battle of the Staceys for the Democratic nomination for governor gets uglier.  GOP candidates push hard to win a runoff spot with frontrunner Casey Cagle.  Plus, Democrats in two congressional districts fight for the right to take on two potentially vulnerable GOP incumbents. 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

Former Congressman Buddy Darden

Republican Strategist Heath Garrett

(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp doubles down on his muscular advocacy for gun rights and it just may be propelling him forward in the GOP governor’s race.  The AJC’s Jim Galloway tells us why he thinks the Parkland massacre has not deterred, but empowered gun supporters.  We’ll also discuss the risky path Democrat Stacey Abrams charts as she works to win her party’s nomination.  Plus, Sonny Perdue’s biggest battle yet as Agriculture Secretary and why Atlanta could soon be on the national political stage once again. 

Panelists:

Actor Tony Hale first rose to fame as the ultimate mother's boy Buster Bluth on the show "Arrested Development." Hale also starred in the HBO series “Veep.”  His character was the personal assistant to President Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Hale's parents live in the Macon area and he spends a lot of time in Georgia. We talked with him in 2016 about his career. 

(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal wraps up the official bill signing period with a flourish: his signature on one bill means Georgians could now pay state sales tax for many online purchases.  He also approved a controversial bill that could set a precedent for allowing Georgia cities to be split in two by residents looking for a change and a he vetoes a bill that was a showcase measure for GOP gubernatorial candidate Casey Cagle.  Plus, the Secretary of State’s Office launches an investigation into potential voting irregularities in last December’s race for Atlanta mayor. 

Adam Ragusea / Center for Collaborative Journalism

In a predominantly Latino immigrant neighborhood outside of Warner Robins, a woman got up and headed to work.

She has asked not to be identified, so that coming forward about what happened next on that recent morning won’t be used against her, as she fights to stay in the country she’s called home for 15 years.

As she drove away, the woman said, she saw a Houston County sheriff’s deputy parked at a house near hers.

“He was waiting,” she said in Spanish.

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the 2018 primary elections are just two weeks away and we now have information on early voting that may offer clues as to what to expect on May 22.  Then, Kennesaw State University is making headlines again, this time over questions about their policy on accepting Georgians who are undocumented residents.  Plus, a high powered, well-connected Republican Atlanta attorney whose nomination to become an ambassador is on hold.  Is his embrace of a controversial Georgia election law holding him back?

Panelists:

The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. Brown's departure comes amid what another outgoing editor called a "transformation" of the newspaper. Brown joined us in the studio to discuss the way local news is changing and reflect on his longtime career covering the news in middle Georgia. 

Adam Ragusea / GPB

The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. 

Kemp For Governor/YouTube

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal has only a week left to take action on bills passed during the 2018 legislative session.  Our panel will look at how he may respond to some of the most contentious measures on his desk and at bills that, once signed, will have an impact on Georgians.  Then, GOP gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp is facing harsh criticism for an allegedly humorous ad in which he points a gun at a teenage boy looking to date on of his daughters.  Kemp’s response to the attacks: just spell my name right!  Plus, a new Pew research study shows that Americans hav

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A string of 32 arsons that began in January in Macon-Bibb County has almost doubled the pace of firefighting in the county.

There were 11 arsons in April alone. Macon-Bibb County Fire Chief Marvin Riggins says in a typical month, firefighters here tackle five or six serious, fully involved house fires. 

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, he’s been out of office for three months, but Kasim Reed’s actions during his final time as Mayor of Atlanta is under intense scrutiny.  We’ll break down the issues.  Also, early voting has begun for the March 22 primary elections, but is anyone paying attention yet?  One of journalism’s most respected data crunchers calls the Georgia Democratic governor’s race a template for the trends that define the national Democratic Party’s ideological struggle in 2018.

Panelists:

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a weight is lifted from Johnny Isakson’s back: President Trump’s embattled personal doctor, Ronny Jackson, withdraws his name from consideration of VA Secretary.  Isakson was unhappy with Trump’s choice from the very beginning.  Then, Republican State House incumbent Betty Price draws a well-known challenger in her primary race.  Have her many controversial statements made her vulnerable?  Plus, a middle Georgia school district becomes the first in the state to authorize some of its teachers to carry guns in the classroom.  Will more districts follow?

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump sends mixed signals about his support for  his embattled nominee to head the Veterans’ Administration.  Now, Georgia’s Johnny Isakson holds a key to the fate of Dr.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 


 

There’s a little dirt path leading from Pio Nono Avenue to what until not too long ago was a Kroger grocery store. The store’s closed now.

 

One morning before the closure, Shon Williams walked down the path, headed toward her apartment. Like a lot of people in this neighborhood, she can afford groceries, but she can’t afford a car.

On this edition of Political Rewind, with primary election approaching rapidly, a new poll from the AJC shows democratic voters remain largely disengaged from the race for governor, but there is a clear-cut favorite among those who have made up their minds.

(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal forges an agreement that will save health care choices for more than half a million Georgians.  Our panel will weigh in on this exercise in gubernatorial clout.  Then, news about the race to succeed Deal: Democrat Stacey Abrams wins two major endorsements in her bid to become Georgia’s next governor while Brian Kemp finds a way to turn a lost endorsement into a win with help from a prominent member of the same organization.  We’ll also look at newly released fundraising totals for candidates in races for congressional seats Democrats are ta

(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

On this edition of Political Rewind, one day after James Comey unleashes a barrage of attack on President Trump’s character, the leader of an effort to impeach the president brings his campaign to Georgia.  Will billionaire Tom Steyer find support for his effort here?  Then, an ethics probe find no evidence to back the claims of a woman who accused David Shafer of sexual harassment, but will the accusation linger as Shafer campaigns to become Lieutenant Governor?  Plus, Governor Deal steps in to media a dispute that threatens the health care coverage of hundreds of thousands of Georgians.

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we take the show on the road to Macon and the campus of Mercer University to hear from voters and local political experts about the issues that matter to middle Georgians.  Do residents there feel their voices are heard up I-75 at the State Capitol and how will those feelings resonate come election day?  Also, Macon and Bibb County have a joint government that was intended to save money, but has it worked?  We discuss.

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

Stephen Fowler (GPB)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms calls for the resignations of almost everyone in city leadership.  Will the move help the city begin moving past a corruption scandal and help Bottoms separate herself from her predecessor?  National Guard troops amass on the US-Mexico border under orders of President Trump, who says he will not negotiate on a long-term DACA solution, while here in Georgia, the issue is top of mind for Republican candidates for office.   A leading immigration lawyer joins us to discuss what's happening.  Plus, Democrats seeking to oust

(AP Photo/Leita Cowart)

On this edition of Political Rewind, DeKalb County CEO Michael Thurmond is spearheading a challenging proposal to make Stone Mountain a symbol of diversity and inclusiveness.  Could it be a blueprint for dealing with Confederate memorials around the state?  Also, the latest financial disclosure reports show that Georgia gubernatorial candidates have raked in boatloads of cash, but a couple are far our front in the fundraising sweepstakes.  We’ll look at what the reports tell us about the state of the race.  Plus, in the aftermath of Sinclair Broadcasting’s controversial order demanding a mu

Today on "Political Rewind," we discuss Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue's promise to farmers that they won't bare the brunt of a potential trade war with China. This, even as the President bares down on his threat to expand tariffs on Chinese goods. 

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