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(AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser, File)

From GPB News, this is Political Rewind.  Today, a long-awaited decision from the United States Supreme Court in Florida’s fight with Georgia over water rights from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.  We’ll discuss what happens next in the fight. 


HDS Community Garden / Flickr

In one way or another, access to green space — or lack thereof — affects all 10 million Georgians. Around the state, communities are looking for ways to help everyone get outside and lead healthier lives. In Macon, there’s Georgia’s first urban agrihood. In Savannah, there’s a campaign underway to make bicycles more accessible and safe roadways more available. And in Athens, a network of community gardens and farmers markets helps educate and empower everyone from school children to seniors.

 


(AP Photo/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re one month away from the runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp to decide the Republican nominee for governor.  What is Casey Cagle saying on the campaign trail to connect himself to the most popular Republican in the state?


(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump may have signed an order keeping immigrant families arrested at the border together, but it’s his comments this morning about pending immigration legislation that some say just threw GOP members of Congress under the bus. 


AP Photo

Johnny Mercer grew up in Savannah and went on to write some of the most popular love songs of the 20th century. You may not know his name, but you certainly know his music, which includes "Something’s Gotta Give," "Moon River," and "Autumn Leaves." Between 1929 and 1976, Mercer wrote the lyrics—and in some cases the music too—to some 1,400 songs.

We explore the life and music of Johnny Mercer with Georgia State University archivist Kevin Fleming. Georgia State is the repository for Johnny Mercer’s papers as well as a vast collection of other materials related to his life and career.


(AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal announces a first step to build new transit in metro Atlanta, a huge project along Georgia 400.  Is the state on track to tackle the region’s traffic headaches?


Immigration Showdown In Washington

Jun 18, 2018
(U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, immigration takes center stage in Washington this week.  Outrage over the Department of Justice policy of separating children from parents at the border is growing and it’s spreading across partisan lines. 


Today: Georgia's U.S. Senators go their separate ways over President Trump's tariffs. Johnny Isakson wants Congress to approve them while David Perdue says the President has the power to act on his own. We'll look at that split, and at Perdue's apparent unwavering loyalty to the Trump agenda. 


Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, GA

Savannah businessman Charles Lamar on Nov. 28, 1858, became the first person in 40 years to land a slave ship on American soil.

That event is the subject of Jim Jordan’s new book, “The Slave-Trader’s Letter-Book: Charles Lamer, the Wanderer, and other Tales of the African Slave Trade.”

Jordan was able to reconstruct the story because he got his hands on valuable research material — Charles Lamar’s own letters, which most historians didn’t even believe existed.   


Grant Blankenship / GPB

A little trove of Georgia’s biological treasures once without homes now have them.

 

They were preserved animals, mammals and birds, that instructors and staff in the Science Department at Mercer University found while moving to their new building. Mercer biologist Craig Byron said they needed a better home than a dumpster out back.

 

 


AP Photo/John Amis

GOP gubernatorial candidate under fire for a secret recording, in which he admits he used legislation to undermine a primary opponent. And why did former rival Clay Tippins record and leak the tape? Our panel has answers.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Who is Atticus Finch really—an arch-segregationist or a champion of justice? And how do we go about answering that question when going straight to the source isn’t an option?


GPB News

Congress tacked the Family First Act onto a bill to fund the government earlier this year. The move shifts the bulk of federal foster care funding from residential care to preventative services. It takes effect in October 2019.

The goal is to keep kids at home using parent training and treatment for substance abuse and mental health. Alison Evans is the CEO of the Methodist Home in Macon where 80 foster children live. She said the act’s fine print fails to consider whether the state is equipped to provide these services.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s something people think they know about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as SNAP.

It’s the idea that people who use what we used to call food stamps spend their once monthly benefits on groceries almost immediately after they get them. When you look at averages, that’s true, and for some it can mean some lean and hungry days at the end of the month before the next round of SNAP benefits.

 

 


(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Casey Cagle goes to Vegas to raise campaign cash and Brian Kemp warns voters he may be there with casinos in Georgia on his mind.  Will gambling become a major issue in the governor’s race?  Then, what’s behind Karen Handel’s rejection of President Trump’s newly imposed tariffs?  Plus, does morality in politics matter anymore?  We’ll look at Bill Clinton’s recent “tone deaf” comments on Monica Lewinsky and the #MeToo movement, Ralph Reed’s defense of President Trump’s behavior and a poll that shows more Americans than ever are just fine with pornography.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Chalk it up to the law of unintended consequences.

The Federal tax reform that passed this year was intended to provide tax relief. The perhaps unintended effect was a potentially massive disruption in one of the private solutions to public sector problems often beloved by Republicans and Democrats alike.

 


(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Supreme Court issues a landmark ruling, siding with a baker who refused to make a gay couple’s wedding cake. It’s a narrowly argued decision, but it will have an impact here in Georgia and across the country.  Then, Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Casey Cagle have been polling voters to come up with strategies for how to win the governor’s mansion.  Meanwhile, Brian Kemp is promoting his own polls that show him neck-and-neck with Cagle for the GOP nomination.  Our panel looks at the latest news from the governor’s race.  Plus, could a federal court force Georgia election officials to scramble to provide paper ballots for the November elections?


(AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the always contentious issues of illegal immigration is back in the spotlight.  A bi-partisan group of U.S. House members is pushing hard to bring a number of reform bills to the floor for a vote, but Speaker Paul Ryan isn’t ready to play ball.  Also, the White House is under fire for promoting a policy of separating children from parents when families are apprehended by border police.


GPB News

Leroy Gresham was a 12-year-old boy living in Macon when the Civil War broke out in 1860. He kept his diaries until he died of a rare form of tuberculosis just five years later.

Virginia historian and recently retired high school teacher Janet Croon learned about the diaries while working on a project.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The latest in our Macon Conversations series: Meet Charise Stephens and Scott Mitchell. In their conversation, Charise and Scott tackle the challenges of overcoming the prejudice you are raised with.

Roseanne And Racism

May 30, 2018
(Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, ABC’s firing of Roseanne Barr over her Twitter bullying of Valerie Jarrett is the hottest topic in the country today. Why can’t we erase the stain of racism that continues to plague us? Do Southerners have a unique perspective on the problem? Our panel weighs in on what may be the thorniest issue in American life. Also, Republicans have begun their effort to paint Stacey Abrams in a negative light, pushing her to release her tax returns and explain her financial problems. Meanwhile, Casey Cagle begins his TV campaign to win the GOP runoff with a sunny message from his wife. How will Brian Kemp respond?


On Second Thought For Tuesday, May 29, 2018

May 29, 2018
GPB

Here’s something you add to your burn book. "Mean Girls" is now a Tony Award-nominated Broadway musical. The musical is up for 12 awards. (That’s so fetch!) The play features an all-star cast of mainstays and breakouts, including Grey Henson, who is nominated for the Tony for best featured actor in a musical. Henson grew up in Macon and plays Damian in the show. The actor talked with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about life on Broadway and what it’s like working with Tina Fey.

Courtesy Grey Henson

Here’s something you add to your burn book. "Mean Girls" is now a Tony Award-nominated Broadway musical. The musical is up for 12 awards. (That’s so fetch!)

The play features an all-star cast of mainstays and breakouts, including Grey Henson, who is nominated for the Tony for best featured actor in a musical. Henson grew up in Macon and plays Damian in the show.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, after choosing their nominee for governor, Georgia Democrats declare they are unified and energized to put Stacey Abrams in the Governor’s Mansion this fall. Meanwhile, Republicans here and in Washington are wasting no time attacking Abrams even as they face a potentially contentious gubernatorial runoff battle between Brian Kemp and Casey Cagle. Our panel weighs in on the latest news in the midterm elections. Plus, what was behind Democratic Congressman David Scott’s emotional speech in the U.S. House last week. The AJC’s Jim Galloway tells us why Scott thinks racism is behind a funding measure dropped from the Farm Bill.


(AP Photos/John Bazemore, Todd Kirkland, John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the race for governor of Georgia moves one step down the road.  Democratic voters advance Stacey Abrams to the general election in overwhelming fashion, while Republicans set the stage for a fight for the soul of their party, a runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp.  Runoffs will also determine which candidates will face GOP congressional incumbents some see as vulnerable in the fall.  Our panel of insiders break down the vote and look at what to expect as they 2018 election marches towards November.

Panelists:

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

11:20 p.m.: Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp will face each other in a July runoff for the Republican spot for governor following tonight’s primary election. The winner takes on Democrat Stacey Abrams,  who could become the first woman, and the first African American, to ever hold the top political seat in Georgia.  Cagle led the pack of GOP candidates from start to finish as results came in, while Kemp easily held off Hunter Hill for second place.  Abrams, meanwhile, stormed out to a huge lead over her opponent, Stacey Evans, and never looked back. 

Grant Blankenship/GPB

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, it’s Election Day in Georgia as voters go to the polls to make their choices in dozens of races.  Democrats will pick their nominee for governor and no matter who wins, it will be the first time ever in Georgia that a woman will lead a party’s ticket into the Fall.  Republicans may send their governor’s race to a mid-summer runoff, which means they’ll endure nine more weeks of campaigning before they can turn their attention to the winning in November.  Also, two potentially vulnerable GOP incumbent members of Congress will be eyeing the results

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Plans for a clinic that would provide abortion access drew protest in Macon. 

About 150 anti-abortion protesters sang, prayed and held sometimes medically graphic posters outside the proposed location of a Summit Medical Center clinic in downtown Macon. Summit Medical Center operates a clinic in Atlanta and another in Detroit.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, voters across Georgia go to the polls tomorrow to elect candidates in dozens of primary races.  Which Stacey will emerge as the Democratic candidate for governor?

On this edition of "Two Way Street," we sit down with four smart, well read Georgians to discuss their favorite books. This conversation picks up the discussion started by "The Great American Read," an eight-part PBS series that unpacks a diverse list of 100 books. "The Great American Read" premieres Tuesday May 22 at 8 PM on GPB. 

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