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A voter enters a polling site in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017.
(AP PHOTO/DAVID GOLDMAN)

Monday night, a federal judge denied a request to move Georgia’s 159 counties to paper ballots ahead of the Nov. 6 midterm election.

But she also denied the state’s request to dismiss the lawsuit, writing that Georgia’s 16-year-old touchscreen voting system is at risk of cyberattack or other threats.

GPB's Stephen Fowler has been following the case. He spoke with GPB's Rickey Bevington about what comes next.


GPB

Today, "On Second Thought" took a scan of the state.

We spoke with NPR political reporter Asma Khalid about low voter turnout, and heard from some of the Georgians she met in Houston, Cobb and Hancock counties.

GPB's own Emily Jones also joined from Savannah with a story about alligators in the Okefenokee swamp, and "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott munched on some edible bugs with University of Georgia entomologist Marianne Shockley.

We also caught up with John T. Edge of the Southern Foodways Alliance. His new series, "TrueSouth," debuts on SEC Network tonight. Chef Todd Richards also told us about his favorite Southern ingredient: collard greens. 

Sean Powers / GPB

We launched a new "On Second Thought" series on Tuesday called “Main Ingredient” in which a chef tells us about his or her essential Southern ingredient. Host Virginia Prescott heads into the kitchen with Atlanta-based chef and cookbook author, Todd Richards. He shares with us his love for collard greens.

"Bacon, Collard and Fried Egg Sandwich" by Todd Richards

SEC Network / Bluefoot Entertainment

Football and food are two mighty markers of Southern identity. The two intersect tonight when John T. Edge and Wright Thompson's new series "TrueSouth," an exploration of Southern food and culture, debuts on SEC Network. In the first episode, Edge, who directs the Southern Foodways Alliance, goes to Birmingham, Alabama, where he meets generations of Greek-Americans who transformed their community. 


Paul Sableman / Flickr

With American politics more polarized than ever, most Americans have at least one thing in common going into midterms: they tend to stay home on Election Day. In fact, as NPR political reporter Asma Khalid has found, midterm elections have not drawn a majority of voters to the polls since the early 1900s. She set out to find out why.


National Weather Service

The National Weather Service says Georgia will be spared the worst of Florence, which was downgraded to a tropical depression Sunday morning. 

Ross Terrell / GPB News

Hundreds of African-Americans met in downtown Atlanta Tuesday for the first State of Black Health conference.


Political Rewind: The Divide Over Medicaid

Sep 11, 2018

On this edition of Political Rewind, Stacey Abrams unveils a proposal she says will provide health care to the neediest Georgians.  The Kemp campaign says Abrams’ plan to expand Medicaid is a non-starter, but they have yet to announce how they’ll address a problem voters say is high on their list of priorities.


As Georgia's November midterm elections steadily approach, GPB's Morning Edition is taking a look at the importance of the offices on the ballot and why Georgians should turn out to vote in these races.

Powered By The People is a weekly series where GPB-Atlanta host Leah Fleming speaks with political voices from around the state to give listeners a better idea about the offices that could impact their futures.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Stephanie McClure, a professor of sociology at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville, had a simple plan.

She and other members of the Middle Georgia Progressive Women activist group would head out to a Baldwin County High School football game with a stack of voter registration forms and sign people up. But when a friend went to the office of the Baldwin County Registrar to pick up the forms, they hit a road block. The forms asked for proof of residency, such as a photo ID, to register.

  

National Hurricane Center

Hurricane season is in full swing with three named storms in the Atlantic. Hurricane Florence is currently churning toward the East Coast as a Category 4 storm.

Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
JOHN AMIS, FILE) / AP PHOTOS

On this edition of Political Rewind, a new poll shows the race between Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams is a virtual tie. The numbers also show how Georgian’s feel about President Donald Trump’s job performance.


Beau Cabell / The Telegraph of Macon

A Peach County man who admitted to killing to sheriff’s deputies in 2016 was sentenced to prison for a term that could cover the remainder of his life, plus at least three more lifetimes.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

The Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender histories of New York and San Francisco are well known. But what about the South?


Beth Macy

On this edition of Political Rewind, for six years, Roanoke-based journalist Beth Macy watched the opioid crisis unfold in struggling Appalachian communities all around her. And so she began documenting the roles that a pharmaceutical industry hungry for profit, medical practitioners intent on easing pain and government agencies slow to recognize the crisis all played in allowing a devastating plague of addiction to grip the entire region.


Chris Saunders / NHPR

In an age when we all seem to be talking at each other, Virginia Prescott thinks we need to do a better job listening.


GPB News

How do you build an economy? From the top down or the ground up?

The major party candidates to be Georgia’s next governor offered their answers those questions at the annual Georgia Chamber of Commerce Luncheon in Macon Tuesday.

In her speech before the Chamber, Democrat Stacey Abrams floated ideas like a $10 million state fund for small business investment, money to be spent on wraparound services in public schools and Medicaid expansion as ideas for building economic capacity from the ground up. She called Medicaid expansion a bipartisan issue.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s a question a lot of Georgians have been asking this election season: given that the secretary of state oversees elections in the state, why doesn’t Brian Kemp have to step down from that position as he seeks to become governor?

 

Cathy Cox is well suited to answer that question. Today Cox is the dean of Walter F. George School of Law At Mercer University in Macon. She’s also run for governor as a Democrat while serving as Georgia’s secretary of state.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

If you know Lindsay Holliday, you know he’s serious about his politics.

Holliday, who most people in Macon know as “Doc,” was once a fixture at Macon City Council meetings where he made good use of the public comment periods. He has run for office. To call him politically active is an understatement.

“I'm an activist. I'm definitely an activist and I'm ready to get active about this,” he said during a recent break at his Macon dentistry practice.

By this, Holliday meant the letter he got in the mail about a week after the second round of Georgia primary voting this year.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Published August 7, 2018

The Macon-Bibb County Commission failed to set a new property tax rate after a contentious meeting Tuesday. That means some services could grind to a halt. 

Local libraries were already within a week of running out of money when commissioners went at each other in a debate over a substantial increase in property taxes Tuesday night. Ultimately, commissioners could find no middle ground and tabled the issue.

  • Macon-Bibb Commissioners Approve Tax Hike
  • Authorities Identify Remains As Missing Georgia Boy
  • Record Number Of Films And TV Shows Made In Georgia


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The monthslong budget fight in Macon-Bibb County that had closed libraries and parked city buses is over.

The Macon-Bibb County Commission voted 5 to 4 to approve a property tax increase Thursday. That will open up the flow of cash to the local health department, parks, public transit and other agencies that were either closed or near closing. There will still be cuts to make before the budget is final.



Credit: Georgia Air National Guard via FLICKR

The new Defense Spending Reauthorization Act lays out the path to the eventual end of a longstanding mission at one of Georgia’s largest military installations.

 

For decades the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System, or JSTARS program at Robins Air Force Base has provided aerial battlefield surveillance. Not only are the JSTARS aircraft based out of Robins, but all of their maintenance is taken care of there, too, by a mix of Air National Guard and civilian personnel.

 

Courtesy Anya Silver

Anya Silver did not flinch from talking about death.

Death enraged her, moved her to compassion and incited her to worry for her son, all of which she wrote about in her poetry published in four books and dozens of journals, but she was never afraid of talking about it. In fact, as a poet Silver thought it was her job to see that her reader confront death as she had.

 


Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photos/John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Stacey Abrams modifies her position on sandblasting the Confederate leaders carved on the face of Stone Mountain. Brian Kemp faces more criticism of how his office is dealing with election security issues.


Spencer Platt / Getty Images

Nearly 1,000 people have been ticketed for handling a cellphone while driving since the Hands-Free Georgia Law took effect July 1, officials say.

According to the Georgia State Patrol, 961 drivers were caught violating the law during its first month. The law makes it illegal to handle a cellphone with any part of the body, GPB News previously reported.

Political Rewind: Russian Hacking Beyond Elections

Aug 3, 2018
Feb. 13, 2013 Georgia Power crewman goes through the process of restoring power to a neighborhood as he works on a line, in Riverdale, Ga.
(AP Photo/John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, emails obtained by a voter security group show that Georgia officials knew about “critical vulnerabilities” in the electronic voting system less than a month before the November election. While the threat of Russian interference in US elections remains a top concern, should Georgia and other states across the country also be concerned about other areas of vulnerability?


Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photos/John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams are laying out the issues and the lines of attack they’ll take into the fall campaign for governor. 


(AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal makes a surprise announcement that he will suspend a controversial jet fuel tax long sought by Delta Air Lines. 


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