kennesaw state university

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the 2018 primary elections are just two weeks away and we now have information on early voting that may offer clues as to what to expect on May 22.  Then, Kennesaw State University is making headlines again, this time over questions about their policy on accepting Georgians who are undocumented residents.  Plus, a high powered, well-connected Republican Atlanta attorney whose nomination to become an ambassador is on hold.  Is his embrace of a controversial Georgia election law holding him back?

Panelists:

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years. Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters. At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. Senate Bill 315 defines unauthorized computer access as a crime under Georgia law, which would make data breaches easier to prosecute. Some people in the tech industry, however, worry SB 315 could actually hinder their ability to do their jobs.

Connor Carey / Wikimedia Commons

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years.

Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters.

At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. 

  • Russian Twitter Trolls Target Georgia
  • KSU Students File Suit Against The University
  • 8-Million Earmarked For School Security

  • Olens Out At KSU
  • Georgia Dome Implosion, Take 2
  • Atlanta Mayoral Race Recount

Kennesaw University President To Step Down Early Next Year

Dec 14, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Georgia education officials say Kennesaw State University President Sam Olens will resign as president early next year.

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Lawyers for Georgia's board of regents say a university president failed to keep state officials informed about moving cheerleaders off the field before football games after some black cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem.

In a report released Tuesday, the board's legal office found that Kennesaw State President Sam Olens did not advise the state's university system of the change in the pregame routine even though he had been instructed to do so.

(AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a bad week for Republicans is now even worse: accusations of inappropriate behavior by Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore puts what should be a safe GOP seat in jeopardy.  Then, in an effort to end a boiling controversy, Kennesaw State University now says cheerleaders can take

Kennesaw State University: Cheerleaders Who Knelt For Anthem To Be On Field

Nov 9, 2017

A Georgia university which moved its football cheerleaders inside a stadium tunnel after a group of black cheer squad members knelt during the national anthem has decided to let them again take the field during pre-game ceremonies.

This time, it will be at a game where military members are honored.

In a letter to students and faculty, Kennesaw State University President Sam Olens said Wednesday that freedom of speech must be protected.

Georgia Attorney General Quits Defense In Server Wiping Case

Nov 2, 2017
Alex Sanz / AP Photo

The Georgia attorney general's office will no longer represent the state's top elections official in an elections integrity lawsuit filed three days before a crucial computer server was quietly wiped clean.

The lawsuit aims to force Georgia to retire its antiquated and heavily questioned touchscreen election technology, which does not provide an auditable paper trail.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the first indictments in the Russia collusion probe remain the chief pre-occupation in Washington, even as the president and the GOP try to shift focus to tax reform and a crucial Trump trip to Asia. Our panel will look at the latest developments in the Mueller probe and weigh in on emerging details in the tax plan. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly is under fire for his comments on the causes of the Civil War and the general who led the Confederate Army.

Georgia Election Server Wiped After Suit Filed

Oct 26, 2017
Alex Sanz / AP Photo

A computer server crucial to a lawsuit against Georgia election officials was quietly wiped clean by its custodians just after the suit was filed, The Associated Press has learned.

Civil Rights Group: School Retaliated Against Cheerleaders

Oct 25, 2017
Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

A national civil rights group says it has "grave concerns" about actions taken by a Georgia university after five black cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem at a football game.

David Goldman / AP Photo

On today’s "Political Rewind" we look at where the GOP race for governor stands in these early days of the contest. A new poll shows Lt. Governor Casey Cagle with a significant lead. But the poll reveals a surprising result in the battle for second place.

Emails: Protests Spur College Officials To Talk With Players

Oct 20, 2017
Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

As protests over racial injustice grab national attention in pro sports, some college and university officials are having pre-emptive talks with student-athletes and consulting each other amid concerns that such actions will spread to college sports, according to emails released Thursday.

After five black cheerleaders at Kennesaw State University knelt during the national anthem at a September football game, athletic officials there sought advice from their counterparts at schools including the University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, Duke University and Purdue University.

kennesaw.edu

On today's Political Rewind, the national debate over athletes and the national anthem lands on the football field at Kennesaw State University. Does newly released evidence show that political pressure shut down protesting cheerleaders? Also, a high level Stacey Abrams campaign official appears on Russian media that is part of the FBI's investigation of organizations that tried to influence last year's presidential election. We also discuss the feud between the president and the family of a fallen U.S. serviceman.

Panelists:

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A powerful lawmaker texted a Georgia sheriff, boasting how they pressured a university president to take action after black cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem at a football game.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution obtained the text messages under Georgia's open records act.

Kennesaw State University cheerleaders were told they'd be kept off field during pregame activities after five knelt to protest racial injustice at a game Sept. 30.

Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

The student who wears the owl mascot costume at a Georgia public university where five cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem had no business leading a cross-campus march in support of the cheerleaders, an influential lawmaker said.

Kenneth Sturkey, who dresses as Scrappy the Owl at Kennesaw State University athletic events, said he donned the costume without permission for Monday's rally on behalf of cheerleaders who knelt at a game Sept. 30 to protest racial inequality.

When you think of bullies, you might think of kids at school. But bullying doesn’t stop with school. A recent study shows women and minorities are most likely to be targeted in the workplace. We spoke with study authors Brandon Attell from the Health Policy Center at Georgia State University and Linda Treiber, a professor of Sociology at Kennesaw State University.

 

Congress of local and regional authorities / Foter

The FBI is investigating an alleged breach of voter data at Kennesaw State University. State officials learned earlier this month that more than seven million voter records from the KSU Center for Elections Systems may have been compromised. 

With us to discuss this is Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Richard Elzey / flickr

In about 10 days, many families will gather around the table for a holiday feast, and you can be sure that most of those tables will include delicious drinks. If your mind has now wandered to wine glasses -- or sweet tea -- stop right there. There's another tasty and tasteful option to serve with all those wonderful dishes. It’s craft beer.

law.ga.gov

Georgia’s Attorney General Sam Olens will interview to be Kennesaw State University’s new president on October 4. But some students and alumni say his appointment would be a step backward for the school.

 

In an e-mail to the entire school, University System of Georgia Chancellor Hank Huckaby said that after “sincere and earnest conversations” with Olens, the Attorney General is “being seriously considered for the role of president” of KSU.

 

Flickr

Each year, over fifty thousand college students struggle to attend classes while coping with homelessness. Last week, Kennesaw State University unveiled a first-of-its-kind housing facility for its homeless students.

We speak with Marcy Stidum, director of the university’s CARE Center, about the facility and the growing issue of homelessness in higher education.

Kennesaw State University unveiled a first-of-its-kind housing facility for its homeless students last week. We speak with Marcy Stidum, director of the university’s CARE center, about the facility and the growing issue of homelessness in higher education.

KENNESAW STATE

A survey by U.S. News and World Report found as many as one in three first-year students did not return to college for a second year between fall 2010 through fall 2013. Kennesaw State University is one of 44 institutions which launched a new initiative to address freshmen retention rates.

Last month, the founder of the Atlanta Latin Academy Charter School was arrested after he was outed for embezzling school funds. Christopher Clemons spent over $600,000 of the school's money on cars, nightclubs, and real estate. The school has since closed under the weight of financial strain. We talk with Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Molly Bloom about the scandal and what it means for charter school oversight in the future.

wikipedia.org

More local education scandals came to light last week, this time at the collegiate level. Kennesaw State University president Daniel Papp resigned suddenly after reports revealed he accepted over $500,000 in retirement benefits while he was still employed. A second audit shows that a conflict of interest in the food services department may have also cost the university hundreds of thousands of dollars more.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Janel Davis joins us to talk more about the problems at Kennesaw State University.