guns

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Since more than a million people demanded stronger gun control laws in the March for Our Lives, many local governments have proposed tougher restrictions on guns. 

 

But some communities, including a couple in Georgia, actually have laws requiring you to own a gun.

 

Wilfredo Lee / AP Photo

A record number of guns were confiscated this year at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. Though that follows a national trend, the Atlanta airport led the nation in the number of guns found for yet another year. We discuss this with Kelly Yamanouchi, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution who focuses on airport-related stories. Tom Barton, a Georgia Criminal Defense Lawyer, also joins us.

The House approved a bill on Wednesday that would ease legal restrictions for carrying concealed firearms across state lines – a move pushed by the National Rifle Association that comes just weeks after mass shootings in Las Vegas and Texas.

On a mostly party-line vote, the measure easily passed, 231-198, although 14 Republicans voted no. Six Democrats voted for the so-called reciprocity measure, which would allow a gun owner with the proper permit in any state to carry a concealed firearm to another state where it is also legal.

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.

President Trump says more thorough vetting for firearms purchases would have made "no difference" in the mass shooting at a Texas church despite reports that the suspect's past conviction on domestic assault charges should have disqualified him under federal law.

At a news conference in Seoul on the second leg of a five-nation Asian tour, Trump was asked by a journalist for NBC if he thought people wanting to purchase firearms should be subject to "extreme vetting."

Chris Ballard / GPB

We’ve been talking about guns in the South.  GPB’s Ryan McFadin visited a shooting range in Milledgeville Georgia to speak with law enforcement firearms instructor and gun hobbyist, Joe Grant. They talked about what it means to be a responsible gun enthusiast, and got in some target practice.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

You may have heard about the Iron Pipeline. It's an underground network used to ship guns from states like Georgia with relatively lax gun laws to other states with tighter regulations. Many of these weapons are purchased legally in the South, but some are stolen. An investigative report finds Atlanta has an alarming rate of guns stolen from cars.

Chris Ballard / GPB

Health economist Ted Miller says to understand the real cost of gun violence, you must factor in the value of human life. According to Miller, the monetary cost of gun violence in Georgia in 2012 was more than $9 billion. He breaks down the cost of shootings.

For Anthony Mackey, 29, guns were part of his upbringing in Albany, Georgia. As a teen, he joined a gang, and saw firsthand the incredible power of a gun. Mackey says being shot at was a turning point in his life.

Chris Ballard / GPB

The Peach State is a leading exporter of illegal firearms. That’s largely due to the I-95 corridor, where guns flow from Georgia to other parts of the country with stricter gun laws. This route’s nicknamed the Iron Pipeline. Many of the illegal weapons end up in New York City. We talk about this with BuzzFeed News National Editor Tina Susman and New York City’s Public Advocate, Tish James.

Why Americans Are So Passionate About Guns

Oct 25, 2017
Chris Ballard / GPB

Guns are more controversial in America than abortion, marijuana, and same-sex marriage. Many of the opinions surrounding guns come from what we hear and see through the media. And yet, our passions about weapons reflect deeper psychological values.

Chris Ballard / GPB

Amid the barrage of news stories about gun violence, there are the real people whose lives are torn apart by tragedy. Semaj Clark, 20, is one of them. Two years ago, he was paralyzed after being shot in Savannah. Now, he’s confined to a wheelchair. Before becoming a vocal anti-gun violence advocate, Semaj was involved in gang activity. He says the media have a certain responsibility when they cover shootings.

Chris Ballard / GPB

Guns are a fixture in many Southern homes. Pew Research estimates at least one in three households keep a gun. We caught up with some gun owners around Georgia to ask why and when they’re armed.

“When I was a little girl, my father taught me how to shoot. And he felt we needed to know how to protect our family. I was eight years old when he first put a gun in my hand,” said CoCo from Atlanta.

NAAGA

The number of  African Americans who own guns is on the rise.

 

According to a 2014 Pew survey, 19 percent of African Americans said they owned a gun, up from 15 percent in 2013.

 

 

 

The National African American Gun Association is a nationwide group based in Atlanta made up of black gun supporters. The organization has seen membership climb to 20,000 members in just two years.

AP / David Goldman

The National Rifle Association held its annual meeting in Atlanta over the weekend. President Donald Trump headlined the event with a speech. Senior producer Emily Cureton was in the crowd, and she brings us this audio postcard.

‘Campus Carry’ Bill Inches Forward

Mar 28, 2017
Matt Barnett / Flickr

Legislation that would allow guns on Georgia’s public college and university campuses is one step closer to passage.

The “campus carry” bill made it through the state Senate Tuesday with a vote of 32-22 after more than an hour of debate.

YukunChen / Foter

A new form of the "campus carry" bill is advancing in the Georgia legislative session. The bill would effectively permit concealed carry of firearms on public colleges across the state. Governor Nathan Deal vetoed a similar measure in last years’ legislative session. With us to discuss the new version is Maureen Downey, education reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Also with us by phone is Matthew Boedy, Professor of English at the University of North Georgia.

There's a wall-long mural in the manufacturing area of SilencerCo, in West Valley City, Utah, that shows a crowd of people with muzzled mouths. One's holding a sign that says, "Fight the Noise." Another says: "Guns don't have to be loud."

As a leading manufacturer and seller of gun silencers — or suppressors, as they're more accurately called — SilencerCo wants to quiet guns. Congress may soon help in the effort.

Updated at 1:55 p.m. ET

The House has approved legislation that would make it harder to keep veterans who are "mentally incapacitated, deemed mentally incompetent" or prone to blackouts from buying guns. Critics of the bill say it could raise the suicide rate among veterans — a rate that has risen in the past decade.

At least a dozen Democrats joined Republicans to support the bill, which was approved by a 240-175 vote.

By a 57-43 margin, the Republican-led Senate voted Wednesday to repeal an Obama-era regulation designed to block certain mentally ill people from purchasing firearms. The vote, which approves a House resolution passed earlier this month, now sends the measure to the White House for President Trump's signature.

Black Friday gun sales set a new record this year. According to the FBI, licensed firearm dealers filed over 185,000 background checks on that day alone.  

 Gun owners across the country say women are a driving force in that sales growth. And women are designing products to make it easier and more fashionable to carry concealed firearms. 

A man was fatally shot following a dispute in a Wal-Mart parking lot in Reno, Nevada, on Thanksgiving night, police say.

The incident began about 6 p.m. on Thursday. Local news station KOLO reported that "there was apparently a dispute over a parking spot" and said police characterized the shooting as a road rage incident.

"Our time is now." That's the message from Wayne LaPierre, the head of the National Rifle Association, to his group's members and gun owners across America, following last week's election.

With a Republican-held Congress and Donald Trump headed to the White House — helped, in no small part, by the support of the NRA — big changes could be coming to the nation's gun laws.

With gun control efforts stalled in Congress and in many statehouses, advocates are forging another path forward: They're going straight to the ballot box.

Voters in four states will weigh gun control initiatives Nov. 8 ballot: Maine, Nevada, Washington and California. In Nevada and Maine, voters are being asked whether to strengthen background check requirements for gun sales. Washington State voters already did that; now they're considering whether to allow a court to take guns away from potentially dangerous people.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

You may have heard about the Iron Pipeline. It's an underground network used to ship guns from states like Georgia with relatively lax gun laws to other states with tighter regulations. Many of these weapons are purchased legally in the South, but some are stolen. A new investigative report finds Atlanta has an alarming rate of guns stolen from cars.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Roughly half of all the guns in this country are possessed by just 3 percent of American adults. That's one of the top findings in a new survey on gun ownership in America from researchers at Harvard and Northeastern universities.

Updated 2:30 a.m. ET Thursday:

Nearly 15 hours: The Associated Press reports that's how long Connecticut Sen. Chris Murphy and his Democratic colleagues held the floor before yielding early Thursday, with a pledge that he would aggressively press for a legislative response to the Orlando, Fla., mass shooting. Murphy has been upset with congressional inaction on gun violence.

Original Post:

Senate Democrats say they are bringing Senate business to a halt in an effort to force some action on gun control.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

    

 

The scene in the small courtroom inside the Bibb County Law Enforcement center was a familiar one.

 

On a day scheduled for first court appearance, there was one charge on the docket. A murder.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

When it comes to guns, Marciarea Torney-Daramanu is sure of one thing.

“With my kids now? When they get of age to own a gun I will make sure they are trained to use a gun,” she said.

She didn’t always feel this way. On a rainy day she shows me into her kitchen in her home in the Bloomfield neighborhood of Macon. She points to a magnet on her refrigerator.

“This is my son right here,” Marciarea said.

The photo is Stacy K. Johnson, Jr., Marciarea’s son. He’s holding his children.

“He’s the one that got killed right there,” she said.