gun violence

Colleges and universities across Georgia have wrapped up the semester, but one Morehouse College student has more work to do. Last year, Julien Turner took an extra credit biology assignment and turned it into a viral music video about the differences between mitosis and meiosis. The rising junior's video made it all the way to the people who work on "Sesame Street." Now, Julien and his brother are creating an educational music video for the show. Julien spoke with GPB's Leah Fleming about the project.

Atlanta’s Donald Glover has found a new level of success. He’s an actor, the creator of a hit show named after his hometown of Atlanta, and a rapper under the name Childish Gambino. But his most powerful statement might be “This Is America”, a new song and video released over the weekend. Freelance entertainment reporter Jewel Wicker gives us her take on the video and what role musicians should play when it comes to social issues.

Childish Gambino / Screenshot by GPB

Just as we do at the end of every week, this Friday we brought together a group of four smart people to help us break down the week's news. On Second Thought host Tony Harris sat down with our Breakroom panel — Ed Sohn, Anjali Enjeti, Greg Wiliams and Tomika Depriest — to process President Trump's withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal, Islamophobia on "Roseanne," and the symbolism in the music video for Childish Gambino's new song "This is America."

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Since more than a million people demanded stronger gun control laws in the March for Our Lives, many local governments have proposed tougher restrictions on guns. 

 

But some communities, including a couple in Georgia, actually have laws requiring you to own a gun.

 

On Second Thought For Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Mar 27, 2018

A teenager in Thomasville, Georgia is facing charges for allegedly stealing a gun from a car earlier in March. We've seen this problem across the state. In 2016 The Trace, an investigative news website, examined firearm theft in Atlanta and Savannah. finding Atlanta led many cities with its rate of guns stolen from automobiles. We spoke with Brian Freskos, a reporter who covers gun trafficking for The Trace. 

An estimated 30,000 people turned out for the March For Our Lives in Atlanta. Students led the massive crowd through downtown chanting "Not One More," "Books Not Bullets" and "Vote Them Out." Voting was a major theme of the event. Volunteers fanned out with clip boards to register young marchers. Georgia students and survivors from the February school shooting in Parkland, Florida, gave speeches. So did U.S. Rep. John Lewis and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms. Bottoms told the crowds, "Atlanta stands with you." 

GPB News / Emily Cureton

Editor's Note: Savannah State police chief James Barnwell was placed on administrative leave with pay as of March 23, 2018. The university says it is conducting an internal investigation and declined to comment further on the matter. Attorney Abda Quillian now represents two female officers from the university force. She tells GPB News that the University System of Georgia is investigating two misconduct complaints they filed against Barnwell. He is at least the third person to lead Savannah State’s public safety department in the last five years.

Emily Jones / GPB News

Thirty Savannah residents face federal charges following an investigation of two rival gangs, prosecutors announced Wednesday.

 

The gangs operate in a small neighborhood southwest of downtown, known as Cuyler-Brownsville.

 

US Attorney Bobby Christine said since January, there have been more than 600 reports of shots fired in that neighborhood - and residents have said they’re scared.

When U.S. officials feared an outbreak of the Zika virus last year, the Department of Health and Human Services and state officials kicked into high gear.

They tested mosquitoes neighborhood by neighborhood in Miami and other hot Gulf Coast communities where the virus was likely to flourish. They launched outreach campaigns to encourage people to use bug spray. And they pushed the development of a vaccine.

A special hour about guns in the South: the people who own them, the emotions they stir, how they’re bought and sold, the total cost of gun violence, and the history of laws controlling who has access to them.

For most of us, our idea of politics is influenced by what we see on TV. Millions of Americans regularly watch shows like “The West Wing,” “Veep,” and “House of Cards." Georgia native Jay Carson worked as supervising producer and political consultant for Netflix’s “House of Cards.” We talk with him about how to write engaging political drama in 2017, and how much the fictional White House resembles the real one.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

President Trump says the people of Las Vegas have shown the world their character, courage and resolve in the wake of Sunday's shooting massacre.

The president and first lady visited Las Vegas on Wednesday to show support for the victims as well as the people who cared for them.

"The only message I can say is that we're with you 100 percent," Trump said at University Medical Center, were dozens of the wounded were being treated. As he spoke, the president was surrounded by doctors and nurses in lab coats and scrubs.

A report released last month provides a grim picture on the effects of gun violence on children. Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta found nearly 1,300 children in the United States die in shootings each year. That makes gunshot wounds the third leading cause of death for children up to the age of 17. We talk with Atlanta-based trauma surgeon Omar Danner, who worked on a separate report about the victims of gun violence admitted to Grady Hospital.

Jefferson Police Department via AP

Gun rights are often a subject of political argument, but doctors see the physical effects of gun violence everyday. Researchers at the Morehouse School of Medicine reviewed gunshot victims at a trauma center in Atlanta, and they found that over two years the bulk of the patients were male and African-American. We talked with Dr. Omar Danner, one of the study's researchers.

Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department/Savannah Morning News via AP

Over the holiday weekend, three people in Savannah were killed following a shooting and car crash. Savannah has one of the highest murder rates in Georgia.

First, Sucheta Rawal is a children’s book author on a mission. She created Beato, a world traveling cat, who’s part of a broader plan to raise cultural awareness in both kids and adults. Her latest book is “Beato Goes to Indonesia,” which just hit the shelves. The author joins us in the studio.

UPDATE: Savannah Police: Shootings, Crash 'Gang Related'

Jul 6, 2017
Courtesy of SCMPD

Savannah's police chief is blaming gang members for shootings in the city's downtown historic district that led to a police chase in which a fleeing SUV crashed and killed three people.

Savannah-Chatham County Police Chief Joseph Lumpkin said at a news conference Wednesday the shootings that wounded three people at about 12:13 a.m. were "group-gang" related. He showed reporters video of an SUV pulling alongside a sidewalk bench where several people sat before they jumped suddenly and ran as shots were fired.

Arrest Made In Savannah Shootings, Car Crash That Killed 3

Jul 5, 2017
Courtesy of SCMPD

Late-night Fourth of July celebrations in Savannah's downtown historic district erupted into chaos early Wednesday after gunfire wounded three people in a popular nightlife district, leading to a police chase in which a fleeing vehicle crashed and killed three others.

NBC L.A.

Four people were shot Monday in an apparent murder-suicide inside an elementary school classroom in San Bernardino, including a teacher and two students, police and school officials said.

Two students were airlifted to a hospital after what's believed to be a domestic dispute, San Bernardino City Unified School District spokeswoman Maria Garcia tells news station KNBC-TV.

San Bernardino Police Chief Jarrod Burguan said on Twitter that four victims were being treated in what investigators suspect was a murder-suicide.

‘Campus Carry’ Bill Inches Forward

Mar 28, 2017
Matt Barnett / Flickr

Legislation that would allow guns on Georgia’s public college and university campuses is one step closer to passage.

The “campus carry” bill made it through the state Senate Tuesday with a vote of 32-22 after more than an hour of debate.

There's a wall-long mural in the manufacturing area of SilencerCo, in West Valley City, Utah, that shows a crowd of people with muzzled mouths. One's holding a sign that says, "Fight the Noise." Another says: "Guns don't have to be loud."

As a leading manufacturer and seller of gun silencers — or suppressors, as they're more accurately called — SilencerCo wants to quiet guns. Congress may soon help in the effort.

President Trump signed a measure into law Tuesday that rescinds an Obama-era rule aimed at blocking gun sales to certain mentally ill people.

The GOP-majority Senate passed the bill by a 57-43 margin earlier this month, following a House vote to overturn the rule.

Georgia House Panel Approves Bill Allowing Guns On Campus

Feb 17, 2017
Ken Lund / Flickr

Licensed gun owners could carry concealed handguns on public college campuses under legislation that began advancing Thursday in the Georgia House despite the Republican governor's forceful veto of a similar bill last year.

A subcommittee of the House Public Safety Committee approved the bill sponsored by Rep. Mandi Ballinger, R-Canton, sending it on to the full committee. Georgia is among 17 states that ban concealed weapons on campus.

Updated Feb. 3 at 4:45 p.m. ET

On Thursday the GOP-controlled House voted to overturn an Obama administration rule designed to keep firearms out of the hands of some people deemed mentally ill.

The action was the latest move by congressional Republicans to undo several of President Obama's regulations on issues such as gun control and the environment through an arcane law called the Congressional Review Act.

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