gun control

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a weight is lifted from Johnny Isakson’s back: President Trump’s embattled personal doctor, Ronny Jackson, withdraws his name from consideration of VA Secretary.  Isakson was unhappy with Trump’s choice from the very beginning.  Then, Republican State House incumbent Betty Price draws a well-known challenger in her primary race.  Have her many controversial statements made her vulnerable?  Plus, a middle Georgia school district becomes the first in the state to authorize some of its teachers to carry guns in the classroom.  Will more districts follow?

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Since more than a million people demanded stronger gun control laws in the March for Our Lives, many local governments have proposed tougher restrictions on guns. 

 

But some communities, including a couple in Georgia, actually have laws requiring you to own a gun.

 

GPB/Emily Cureton

Three weeks since 30,000 people filled Atlanta’s streets to march for gun control, about 80 people rallied under a banner of gun rights at the Georgia State Capitol.

Google Images

Saturday marks two months since a school shooting killed 17 students and educators in Parkland, Florida. Since then, we’ve heard public outrage transform into ever more urgent calls for reforms to the nation's gun laws. Antoinette Tuff knows first-hand what it’s like to come face-to-face with a school shooter: On Aug. 20, 2013, she was working at Decatur’s Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy when a 20-year-old gunman entered with an AK-47 military assault rifle and 500 rounds of ammunition. Tuff talked the gunman down, and no one was injured or killed. She tells us whether teachers should be armed.

Saturday marks two months since a school shooting killed 17 students and educators in Parkland, Florida. Since then, we’ve heard public outrage transform into ever more urgent calls for reforms to the nation's gun laws. Antoinette Tuff knows first-hand what it’s like to come face-to-face with a school shooter: On Aug. 20, 2013, she was working at Decatur’s Ronald E. McNair Discovery Learning Academy when a 20-year-old gunman entered with an AK-47 military assault rifle and 500 rounds of ammunition. Tuff talked the gunman down, and no one was injured or killed. She tells us whether teachers should be armed.

Olivia Reingold

On this edition of Political Rewind, we look at the impact of a big weekend of news.  Hundreds of thousands of students across the country march, including in Atlanta, in support of gun safety measures.  Plus, there are only two days left in the 2018 legislative session.  We’ll look at the key measures that remain undecided.  Then, porn star Stormy Daniels speaks out about her relationship with Donald Trump and about the effort to keep it out of public view.  Will her story have an impact on the Trump Presidency? 

Panelists:

(AP Photo/Jaime Henry-White)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as qualifying continues for the 2018 Georgia elections, the 6th District Congressional Race draws a surprise Democratic candidate.  The race may now become a referendum on gun control.  At the State Capitol, time is running out for Cobb County leaders to decide whether they want to join a highly-touted regional transit funding plan.  Plus, the ACLU accuses a Georgia sheriff’s office of hosting a conference featuring a known anti-Muslim, a poll that shows one GOP candidate for governor gaining support, and why House Speaker Paul Ryan is coming to Atlanta.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we are live from the Georgia State Capitol for Crossover Day.  Which crucial bills will die and which will live to see another day?  Among the measures hanging in the balance: a bill to keep guns out of the hands of Georgians with mental illness and a tax break for Delta Airlines that’s now caught up in the highly charged gun control debate. 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson

Republican Insider Jackie Cushman

On this edition of Political Rewind, we come to you from the headquarters of the State Bar of Georgia in downtown Atlanta in front of an audience of journalists, lawyers and judges from across the state.

Reid Williams / GPB

The Breakroom has a lot to talk about this week, including Fergie’s eyebrow raising National Anthem performance, if counting calories does anything, and the Atlanta airport’s supposed flights to Wakanda. We also discuss controversies surrounding President Donald Trump and the Parkland, Florida shooting last week. Our guests are Natalie Pawelski, Hector Fernandez, Amber Scott, and Greg Williams.

Emily Cureton

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with former Georgia Congressman Jack Kingston.  He's making national headlines for comments calling into question the motives of students mobilizing for gun reform.  Also, as President Trump takes his first steps to improve gun safety, a very large group rallies at the Georgia State Capitol calling for gun control.  Plus, Republican leaders at the State Capitol reach an agreement to cut taxes on Georgians by half a billion dollars in the next five years.  What led to them to act now, despite initial concerns from the governor?  And, a bill to all

  • Gun Control Gathering At The State House
  • Atlanta To Get 5G Wireless Service
  • HUD Grants Going To Three Georgia Communities

(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the Florida shooting tragedy continues to dominate headlines, Georgia educators, parents and students are accessing the vulnerability of schools here.  But at the legislature, there’s little momentum toward passing new gun safety measures.  Meanwhile, President Trump blames the FBI for being too busy investigating Russia collusion to follow up on tips that the Florida shooter was a time bomb waiting to explode.  Then, as the legislature has moved past the halfway point of the session, our panel weighs in on the status of major bills today.  Plus, Robe

The House approved a bill on Wednesday that would ease legal restrictions for carrying concealed firearms across state lines – a move pushed by the National Rifle Association that comes just weeks after mass shootings in Las Vegas and Texas.

On a mostly party-line vote, the measure easily passed, 231-198, although 14 Republicans voted no. Six Democrats voted for the so-called reciprocity measure, which would allow a gun owner with the proper permit in any state to carry a concealed firearm to another state where it is also legal.

President Trump says more thorough vetting for firearms purchases would have made "no difference" in the mass shooting at a Texas church despite reports that the suspect's past conviction on domestic assault charges should have disqualified him under federal law.

At a news conference in Seoul on the second leg of a five-nation Asian tour, Trump was asked by a journalist for NBC if he thought people wanting to purchase firearms should be subject to "extreme vetting."

A special hour about guns in the South: the people who own them, the emotions they stir, how they’re bought and sold, the total cost of gun violence, and the history of laws controlling who has access to them.

For most of us, our idea of politics is influenced by what we see on TV. Millions of Americans regularly watch shows like “The West Wing,” “Veep,” and “House of Cards." Georgia native Jay Carson worked as supervising producer and political consultant for Netflix’s “House of Cards.” We talk with him about how to write engaging political drama in 2017, and how much the fictional White House resembles the real one.

Two weeks ago, bump stocks were just an odd-sounding firearm attachment largely unknown outside gun enthusiast circles.

That all changed early last week with the deadly shooting in Las Vegas, where police discovered a dozen of the devices in the shooter's hotel room overlooking the city's neon-lit Strip. Now, Republicans and Democrats in Congress, the National Rifle Association and other pro-gun groups are asking for a fresh look at the legality of bump stocks.

In the wake of the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history, most Americans — regardless of party — favor tightening restrictions on firearms, according to a new NPR/Ipsos poll.

But significant partisan divides remain — and perhaps relatedly, they exist alongside divides in knowledge about guns in America.

Eight-in-10 Americans told the pollsters they favor bans on assault weapons, high-capacity ammunition magazines and "bump stocks," an accessory used by the Las Vegas shooter that allows a semi-automatic rifle to fire like an automatic weapon.

Do mass shootings, like the tragic event in Las Vegas on the evening of Oct. 1, change people's minds about gun control?

From a policy perspective, we can ask whether changes in gun regulations would likely affect the occurrence of mass shootings and other forms of gun violence. (We certainly should be asking these questions.)

The Breakroom returns! We discuss robot chefs, Amazon’s new HQ, and Nintendo brining back some 16 bit magic. We also examine Trump's handling of Puerto Rico, middle fingers, and gun laws, or lack thereof… Joining us this week are Kathy Lohr, Hector Fernandez, Christian Zsilavetz, and Greg Williams.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

The National Rifle Association says it is open to new regulations on bump stocks, devices possessed by the mass shooter in Las Vegas that can be used to fire rifles similarly to automatic weapons. This comes as top Republicans in Congress appear open to the idea of a federal law banning the devices.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

President Trump says the people of Las Vegas have shown the world their character, courage and resolve in the wake of Sunday's shooting massacre.

The president and first lady visited Las Vegas on Wednesday to show support for the victims as well as the people who cared for them.

"The only message I can say is that we're with you 100 percent," Trump said at University Medical Center, were dozens of the wounded were being treated. As he spoke, the president was surrounded by doctors and nurses in lab coats and scrubs.

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET

A horrific shooting in Las Vegas is prompting fresh calls from Democrats on Capitol Hill to pass stricter gun laws, but the Republican majority has made clear that cracking down on gun rights is not on the agenda.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET.

President Trump spoke to the National Rifle Association's annual leadership forum on Friday, the first sitting president since Ronald Reagan to do so.

"We have news that you've been waiting for ... a long time," Trump told the crowd in Atlanta. "The eight-year assault on your Second Amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end."

Much of his speech echoed the rhetoric he used on the campaign, and has continued at rallies during his first 100 days in office.

‘Campus Carry’ Bill Inches Forward

Mar 28, 2017
Matt Barnett / Flickr

Legislation that would allow guns on Georgia’s public college and university campuses is one step closer to passage.

The “campus carry” bill made it through the state Senate Tuesday with a vote of 32-22 after more than an hour of debate.

Updated at 1:55 p.m. ET

The House has approved legislation that would make it harder to keep veterans who are "mentally incapacitated, deemed mentally incompetent" or prone to blackouts from buying guns. Critics of the bill say it could raise the suicide rate among veterans — a rate that has risen in the past decade.

At least a dozen Democrats joined Republicans to support the bill, which was approved by a 240-175 vote.

President Trump signed a measure into law Tuesday that rescinds an Obama-era rule aimed at blocking gun sales to certain mentally ill people.

The GOP-majority Senate passed the bill by a 57-43 margin earlier this month, following a House vote to overturn the rule.

Pages