GPB Midterms 2018 Coverage

Read and listen to all our Midterm Elections coverage here.

Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

On a recent sunny Monday, joggers on their morning stroll in Fayetteville's McCurry Park  might have been surprised to hear thumps, clicks and whirrs coming from the elections trailer next to the parking lot.

Over the course of several days, that trailer 20 miles south of Atlanta was where officials tested close to 300 voting machines to ensure they operated smoothly and accurately. Those machines would go out to 36 precincts across the county for the Nov. 6 midterm election.


With less than a month remaining before Georgia's midterm elections, GPB's Morning Edition is taking a look at the importance of the offices on the ballot and why Georgians should turn out to vote in these races.

Powered By The People is a weekly series where GPB Atlanta host Leah Fleming speaks with political voices from around the state to give listeners a better idea about the offices that could impact their futures.

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Former President Jimmy Carter threw his support behind democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams and her vision for rural healthcare in his hometown of Plains Tuesday.

Carter and his wife Rosalynn joined Abrams in front of the brand new Mercer University run health clinic across from the rail depot in Plains.


A new voting machine which prints a paper record sits on display at a polling site in Conyers, Ga.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Federal Judge Amy Totenberg denied a group’s request to require the state to switch to paper ballots. Georgia’s 27,000 electronic voting machines will remain in use for November’s election. But she said that Georgia's election officials have "buried their heads in the sand" on the issue of voting vulnerabilities.


AP

As Georgia's November midterm elections steadily approach, GPB's Morning Edition is taking a look at the importance of the offices on the ballot and why Georgians should turn out to vote in these races.

Powered By The People is a weekly series where GPB-Atlanta host Leah Fleming speaks with political voices from around the state to give listeners a better idea about the offices that could impact their futures.

This week, we examine the role of the Lieutenant Governor in Georgia, a seperate election from the nationally scrutinized Governor's race. 

Wikimedia Commons

Is Georgia turning blue? That question came up in 2014 when Jason Carter ran for governor, in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president and in 2017 with Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the most expensive House race in history. Every time, however, Georgia remained a red state where Republicans won.


As Georgia's November midterm elections steadily approach, GPB's Morning Edition is taking a look at the importance of the offices on the ballot and why Georgians should turn out to vote in these races.

Powered By The People is a weekly series where GPB-Atlanta host Leah Fleming speaks with political voices from around the state to give listeners a better idea about the offices that could impact their futures.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Stephanie McClure, a professor of sociology at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville, had a simple plan.

She and other members of the Middle Georgia Progressive Women activist group would head out to a Baldwin County High School football game with a stack of voter registration forms and sign people up. But when a friend went to the office of the Baldwin County Registrar to pick up the forms, they hit a road block. The forms asked for proof of residency, such as a photo ID, to register.


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

After drawing the attention of the whole country, election officials in Randolph County decided Friday morning not to close polling places. The decision took about 45 seconds.

GPB News

How do you build an economy? From the top down or the ground up?

The major party candidates to be Georgia’s next governor offered their answers those questions at the annual Georgia Chamber of Commerce Luncheon in Macon Tuesday.

In her speech before the Chamber, Democrat Stacey Abrams floated ideas like a $10 million state fund for small business investment, money to be spent on wraparound services in public schools and Medicaid expansion as ideas for building economic capacity from the ground up. She called Medicaid expansion a bipartisan issue.

GOP candidate for governor Brian Kemp.
Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s a question a lot of Georgians have been asking this election season: given that the secretary of state oversees elections in the state, why doesn’t Brian Kemp have to step down from that position as he seeks to become governor?

 

Cathy Cox is well suited to answer that question. Today Cox is the dean of Walter F. George School of Law At Mercer University in Macon. She’s also run for governor as a Democrat while serving as Georgia’s secretary of state.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

If you know Lindsay Holliday, you know he’s serious about his politics.

Holliday, who most people in Macon know as “Doc,” was once a fixture at Macon City Council meetings where he made good use of the public comment periods. He has run for office. To call him politically active is an understatement.

“I'm an activist. I'm definitely an activist and I'm ready to get active about this,” he said during a recent break at his Macon dentistry practice.

By this, Holliday meant the letter he got in the mail about a week after the second round of Georgia primary voting this year.


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