Georgia

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Ellen Eldridge / GPB News

The centuries old art of busking — or performing in public places for tips — is currently encouraged in Decatur.

The city is trying out a program that makes it easy to get a permit and take art and music to the streets.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Who is Atticus Finch really—an arch-segregationist or a champion of justice? And how do we go about answering that question when going straight to the source isn’t an option?


El Rocko Lounge on Facebook

The weekend is here yet again, and Bill Dawers of hissing lawns and the Savannah Morning News has some tips for making the most of it.


  • Fulton County Decriminalizes Marijuana
  • Federal Funding For Savannah Harbor Expansion Clears House
  • GA DNR Fielding More Alligator Calls This Spring

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

In the midst of ongoing investigations involving bribery and open records violations at Atlanta City Hall, the mayor's office is explaining why taxpayers were wrongly charged more than $2,000 for a plane ticket for the mayor's husband Derrick Bottoms — who is a vice president at The Home Depot, not a city employee.


Viola Davis

More women are running for elected office this fall. The number of female candidates for U.S. Congress has doubled since 2016.

In Georgia, DeKalb County activist Viola Davis launched a last minute campaign to unseat her longtime representative in last month's primary election — and she won.

GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been following the midterm elections, and he joined Rickey Bevington in the studio to talk about this race and the greater context of women running for office.


  •  Cobb County Faces Budget Shortage
  • New Study Suggests Changes To SNAP Program
  • City Of Atlanta Moves Forward With Plans To Demolish Blight

GPB News

Congress tacked the Family First Act onto a bill to fund the government earlier this year. The move shifts the bulk of federal foster care funding from residential care to preventative services. It takes effect in October 2019.

The goal is to keep kids at home using parent training and treatment for substance abuse and mental health. Alison Evans is the CEO of the Methodist Home in Macon where 80 foster children live. She said the act’s fine print fails to consider whether the state is equipped to provide these services.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s something people think they know about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as SNAP.

It’s the idea that people who use what we used to call food stamps spend their once monthly benefits on groceries almost immediately after they get them. When you look at averages, that’s true, and for some it can mean some lean and hungry days at the end of the month before the next round of SNAP benefits.

 

 


(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Casey Cagle goes to Vegas to raise campaign cash and Brian Kemp warns voters he may be there with casinos in Georgia on his mind.  Will gambling become a major issue in the governor’s race?  Then, what’s behind Karen Handel’s rejection of President Trump’s newly imposed tariffs?  Plus, does morality in politics matter anymore?  We’ll look at Bill Clinton’s recent “tone deaf” comments on Monica Lewinsky and the #MeToo movement, Ralph Reed’s defense of President Trump’s behavior and a poll that shows more Americans than ever are just fine with pornography.


  • Cobb County Could Close Parks, Libraries
  • Augusta Commissioners Pass Smoking Ban In Public Spaces
  • DeKalb County Mega-Church Pastor Resigns

  • Robert F. Kennedy's Legacy Of Fighting For Civil Rights In The South
  • APS Extends Superintendant Meria Carstarphen Until 2020
  • Foster Care System In Georgia Could Be Harmed By Family First Act


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Chalk it up to the law of unintended consequences.

The Federal tax reform that passed this year was intended to provide tax relief. The perhaps unintended effect was a potentially massive disruption in one of the private solutions to public sector problems often beloved by Republicans and Democrats alike.

 


  • APS Renews Superintendent Meria Carstarphen's Contract
  • MARTA To Take Over Atlanta Streetcar Operations
  • K-12 Educator Scope Cyber Curriculm In Augusta This Week

Office of Attorney General

The Georgia attorney general's office does not intend to criminally charge the city of Atlanta for open records violations at City Hall, officials said.

A letter written by an assistant to Attorney General Chris Carr said the city won't be charged with violating Georgia's open records laws, the Associated Press reports.

However, the letter obtained by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and WSB-TV also says individuals could be prosecuted if evidence supports it.

Atlanta Police Department

In March, hackers attacked Atlanta’s computer network. They held data hostage for a $51,000 ransom, which the city didn’t pay.

The group SamSam was identified in the ransom note. It’s known for choosing targets with weak security and high incentives to regain control of their information.


GPB Evening Headlines For Monday June 4, 2018

Jun 4, 2018

  • Supreme Court Ruling On Colorado Baker Could Impact Georgia
  • Atlanta Cyberattack Fallout Continues As Dashcam Footage Is Lost
  • DeKalb County Schools Sue City Of Atlanta Over 


(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Supreme Court issues a landmark ruling, siding with a baker who refused to make a gay couple’s wedding cake. It’s a narrowly argued decision, but it will have an impact here in Georgia and across the country.  Then, Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Casey Cagle have been polling voters to come up with strategies for how to win the governor’s mansion.  Meanwhile, Brian Kemp is promoting his own polls that show him neck-and-neck with Cagle for the GOP nomination.  Our panel looks at the latest news from the governor’s race.  Plus, could a federal court force Georgia election officials to scramble to provide paper ballots for the November elections?


  • Contract Worker Hit, Killed By MARTA Train
  • NSA Leaker Reality Winner Marks One Year In Jail
  • Georgia Tech Basketball Coach Cleared Of Sexual Assault Charges

GPB Morning Headlines For Monday, June 4, 2018

Jun 4, 2018

  • Athens Officer Fired After Striking Fleeing Man With Patrol Car
  • APD Chief Erika Shields Says All Dashcam Footage Lost After March Cyberattack
  • Atlanta Braves See Sharp Rise In Ratings During First Place Season


GPB News / Emily Cureton

In April three dozen members of a neo-Nazi group rallied in Newnan,  south of Atlanta. Hundreds showed up to counter protest. Police report no one was injured, but the day raised questions about who pays for free speech when it endangers public safety.  Local governments spent more than $200,000 to keep the peace.


(AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the always contentious issues of illegal immigration is back in the spotlight.  A bi-partisan group of U.S. House members is pushing hard to bring a number of reform bills to the floor for a vote, but Speaker Paul Ryan isn’t ready to play ball.  Also, the White House is under fire for promoting a policy of separating children from parents when families are apprehended by border police.


GPB News

Leroy Gresham was a 12-year-old boy living in Macon when the Civil War broke out in 1860. He kept his diaries until he died of a rare form of tuberculosis just five years later.

Virginia historian and recently retired high school teacher Janet Croon learned about the diaries while working on a project.


GPB News

The Georgia Department of Corrections released its first quarterly report of 2018 detailing contraband interdiction, which detailed nearly 10,000 confiscated items.

Drugs, alcohol, cigarettes and handmade weapons topped the breakdown released by the GADOC on Tuesday.

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