Georgia Politics

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Former President Jimmy Carter threw his support behind democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams and her vision for rural healthcare in his hometown of Plains Tuesday.

Carter and his wife Rosalynn joined Abrams in front of the brand new Mercer University run health clinic across from the rail depot in Plains.


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With American politics more polarized than ever, most Americans have at least one thing in common going into midterms: they tend to stay home on Election Day. In fact, as NPR political reporter Asma Khalid has found, midterm elections have not drawn a majority of voters to the polls since the early 1900s. She set out to find out why.


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Is Georgia turning blue? That question came up in 2014 when Jason Carter ran for governor, in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president and in 2017 with Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the most expensive House race in history. Every time, however, Georgia remained a red state where Republicans won. 


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As we near this year’s November election, there’s one recurring question: Will Georgia become a blue state? Before we look at the political future of the state, we did some research on the past.

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Is Georgia turning blue? That question came up in 2014 when Jason Carter ran for governor, in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president and in 2017 with Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the most expensive House race in history. Every time, however, Georgia remained a red state where Republicans won.


Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp thinks there is a gang problem in Georgia and has laid out his plans for a new group to battle the issue. The Republican candidate for governor has come under scrutiny for figures he used to highlight the problem.


President Trump shakes hands with Ohio 12th District Republican nominee Troy Balderson during a rally last weekend in Lewis Center, Ohio.
(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the panel takes a look at a new attack ad against Stacey Abrams calling her a "Bloomberg-Soros Hate America Leftist." Meanwhile, Abrams uses an appearance on national television to attack Brian Kemp on his job performance as Georgia's Secretary of State. 


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Nearly 1,000 people have been ticketed for handling a cellphone while driving since the Hands-Free Georgia Law took effect July 1, officials say.

According to the Georgia State Patrol, 961 drivers were caught violating the law during its first month. The law makes it illegal to handle a cellphone with any part of the body, GPB News previously reported.

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GPB Radio’s popular weekly program "Political Rewind" is expanding its broadcast schedule to four days a week. Beginning the week of Monday, July 23, listeners will now be able to hear the program live on Tuesdays at 2 p.m. in addition to its Monday, Wednesday and Friday live airings in the same timeslot.

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In the majority of Georgia families, mothers are the sole, primary or co-breadwinners, according to the Center for American Progress. But that doesn't mean they have the wages to adequately support themselves and their loved ones — particularly when it comes to minimum wage workers in Georgia, of whom 6 in 10 are women. And beyond the wage and wealth gap, women lack access to other things that Shilpa Phadke says are critical for their economic security: affordable child care, harassment-free work environments and quality health care. 


Viola Davis

More women are running for elected office this fall. The number of female candidates for U.S. Congress has doubled since 2016.

In Georgia, DeKalb County activist Viola Davis launched a last minute campaign to unseat her longtime representative in last month's primary election — and she won.

GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been following the midterm elections, and he joined Rickey Bevington in the studio to talk about this race and the greater context of women running for office.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Jun 6, 2018
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The Georgia 2018 legislative session recently legalized the use of cannabis oil for treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD affects about 31 million people in the United States. The disorder is often associated with veterans, but another group of heroes — first responders — also struggle with the disorder. According to one survey, one in 15 paramedics and EMTs has attempted suicide. Heather Harp, a paramedic in Atlanta, says she and her colleagues need more support in their battle against PTSD. 

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The Georgia 2018 legislative session recently legalized the use of cannabis oil for treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD affects about 31 million people in the United States. The disorder is often associated with veterans, but another group of heroes — first responders — also struggle with the disorder. According to one survey, one in 15 paramedics and EMTs has attempted suicide. 


(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

11:20 p.m.: Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp will face each other in a July runoff for the Republican spot for governor following tonight’s primary election. The winner takes on Democrat Stacey Abrams,  who could become the first woman, and the first African American, to ever hold the top political seat in Georgia.  Cagle led the pack of GOP candidates from start to finish as results came in, while Kemp easily held off Hunter Hill for second place.  Abrams, meanwhile, stormed out to a huge lead over her opponent, Stacey Evans, and never looked back. 

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Just as we do at the end of every week, this Friday we brought together a group of four smart people to help us break down the week's news. On Second Thought host Adam Ragusea sat down with our Breakroom panel — Soumaya Khalifa, Greg Williams, Natalie Pawelski and Nemr — to put a rest to the Laurel vs. Yanny debate, process the royal wedding drama and analyze the antics of Georgia's GOP candidates for governor

Sadayuki Mikami / AP

Maynard Jackson Jr. was an Atlanta legend. As the first black mayor of a major southern city, Jackson pushed for businesses to adopt affirmative action programs, expanded the Atlanta airport to become the international hub it is today and also led the campaign to bring the 1996 Summer Olympics to Georgia.

 

Jackson's life and legacy are the focus of the new documentary, "Maynard," which was executive produced by his daughter-in-law Wendy Jackson and his son Maynard Jackson III.

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Across the country, record numbers of women are running for elected office in this year’s midterms — and a lot of them are running for the first time. In Georgia, the highest-profile race is the Democratic race for governor, which is pitting Stacey Abrams against Stacey Evans.

 

Elsewhere in the state, more women are running for legislative seats than in years past. Since 2016, the number of women seeking state Senate seats has increased by 40 percent and the number seeking spots in the state House is up about 20 percent. For Democrats especially, the 2018 midterms are a huge opportunity, with the party vying for spots in 121 spots (the most since 2004). Many of those candidates are first-timers, many are in historically red districts and many are women.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Georgia Democrats are hoping 2018 is the year Gwinnett County finally turns blue.  Five Republican lawmakers are either retiring or running for other offices. Democrats are working hard to mobilize voters ahead of the May 22 primary and keep them energized into November.

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years. Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters. At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. Senate Bill 315 defines unauthorized computer access as a crime under Georgia law, which would make data breaches easier to prosecute. Some people in the tech industry, however, worry SB 315 could actually hinder their ability to do their jobs.

Connor Carey / Wikimedia Commons

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years.

Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters.

At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. 

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On Thursday, 'Sine Die' marked the last day of the Georgia General Assembly's 2018 legislative session. As always, lawmakers scrambled to vote on as many bills as possible before the midnight deadline.

We talked with Lisa Rayam, Capitol correspondent for Georgia Public Broadcasting, about what bills are on Governor Nathan Deal’s desk, and which of them are likely to become law.

CREDIT DAVID GOLDMAN/AP FILE PHOTO

Former Georgia Governor and U.S. Senator Zell Miller has died at the age of 86, following treatment for Parkinson's disease. He served as Governor from 1991-1999. While in office he created the HOPE Scholarship and Georgia’s Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Program. He went on to serve in the U.S. Senate for five years.

Miller was a conservative Democrat. He gave a keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention in 1992 and the Republican National Convention in 2004. 

Stephen Fowler, GPB News

Several hundred people lined up along rooftops, parking decks and surface streets to watch this morning's controlled implosion of the Georgia Archives Building.

Built in 1965, the "White Ice Cube" across from the Capitol has been empty since 2003 after engineers determined the building was sinking.