Food

EatingInsectsAthens.com

There’s a conference happening in Athens, and its name tells you all you need to know: Eating Insects.  Members of the North American Coalition for Insects in Agriculture, scientists, chefs and others will discuss everything from the latest recipes to the ethics of eating bugs. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s something people think they know about the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, better known as SNAP.

It’s the idea that people who use what we used to call food stamps spend their once monthly benefits on groceries almost immediately after they get them. When you look at averages, that’s true, and for some it can mean some lean and hungry days at the end of the month before the next round of SNAP benefits.

 

 


Leighton Rowell / GPB

"Barbecue Nation," a new exhibit at the Atlanta History Center, takes a deep dive into the history and culture of the South's most-loved food. But barbecue, like the South and the rest of the United States, is increasingly global. So "On Second Thought" is setting out on a series of roadtrips to see how different cultures and countries represented right here in Georgia do barbecue.

We started off with a visit to Chama Gaúcha, a Brazilian restaurant in the Buckhead neighborhood of Atlanta. Nelcir Muller, the general manager, took us inside the kitchen to show us how people in Brazil — South America's largest country — make their barbecue. In Portugeuse it's called "churrasco." 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 


 

There’s a little dirt path leading from Pio Nono Avenue to what until not too long ago was a Kroger grocery store. The store’s closed now.

 

One morning before the closure, Shon Williams walked down the path, headed toward her apartment. Like a lot of people in this neighborhood, she can afford groceries, but she can’t afford a car.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

There's no future in crabbing.

That's the conclusion Earnest McIntosh, Sr. came to when his son, Ernest McIntosh, Jr. said he wanted to work with his father on the water near their home in Harris Neck, Ga., in McIntosh County. 

"I couldn't see a future into crabbing. But I could see it into oysters," McIntosh, Sr. said. 

That's farmed oysters. Earnest Sr. grew up watching his father work on a crab boat. Earnest Jr. did the same with his dad. Tending to metal cages of oysters spread around the marshland that they lease is what they are hoping will allow them to continue the tradition. 

Mashama Bailey is a fan. Bailey is the head, James Beard Award nominated chef at The Grey restaurant in Savannah. Harris Neck oysters are the first item on the online menu for the restaurant in face.

On a drive from Savannah to Florida, Bailey said she caught the odor of Harris Neck oysters on the wind. 

"They're marshy and funky but they're also clean and salty at the same time," Bailey said. 

In this short film, head out onto the water near Harris Neck where the oysters are farmed with Bailey and the McIntoshes. 

Danielle Scott / flickr

All this year, we’ve paid homage to Southern food. Now, it’s time for cocktails.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought.

All this year, we have raised a glass to Southern food. From sweet tea to fried chicken, every Southern dish tells a story. Southern food scholar Adrian Miller and Ashli Stokes of the Center for the Study of the New South helped us dig into the history of mac and cheese, and how the creamy dish helps us understand Southern identity. 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The next time the you open your kitchen cabinets, consider this: a lot of the processed food we eat today started off as food for soldiers. The Army has a long history of culinary innovation that’s trickled down to our homes. We listened back to our conversation with writer Anastacia Marx de Salcedo, author of the book "Combat-Ready Kitchen: How the U.S.

Erika Beras for NPR

Culinary historian Michael Twitty traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food. In his memoir, "The Cooking Gene," he asks the question: "Who owns Southern food?" We talked with him ahead of his appearance on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m.

Nicole Abalde / flickr

Food can evoke so many rich memories. A new book by Savannah food writer Jonathan Barrett captures some of the stories tied to Southern recipes. We talked with Barrett, author of the new book, Cook & Tell. We also heard from freelance writer Amy Condon, who contributed her own story to the book.

 

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Since the outset of the American presidency, African-Americans have worked in the White House kitchen, but they’re often left out of the history books. We talked with food historian Adrian Miller, author of the book, "The President’s Kitchen Cabinet: The Stories of African-Americans Who Fed Our First Families, From the Washingtons to the Obamas."

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Here in the South, we know our food is delicious, and even the region's young chefs are celebrated. Jasmine Stewart, 12, of Milton, Georgia took first place in FOX’s latest MasterChef Junior competition. We joined Jasmine and her proud family in their kitchen.

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Do you love the kitchen? Do you love it enough earn your living there?

High School students at in the culinary arts track at the Hutchings College and Career Academy in Macon get to answer both of those questions at the school’s Compass Rose Cafe.

 

MARTA

All this year, we’re exploring the South’s identity with food. This is part of a series called Georgia Eats. A new exhibit at the Museum of Design Atlanta hones in on the changing landscape of sustainability.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

In January, Atlanta lost a beloved Atlanta restaurateur: Richard Thomas died at 82. He will be remembered for his R. Thomas Deluxe Grill, which he founded in 1985 as a homage to healthy living. Thomas co-founded the North Carolina fast food chain Bojangles. He also served as the first president of operations at Kentucky Fried Chicken.

University of Georgia Press

Food is an integral part of the South’s identity, and all this year, we’re paying homage to Southern cuisine. It’s a series we call Georgia Eats. A lot of chefs and food writers know the name Mrs. S.R. Dull. In 1928, she wrote the book "Southern Cooking," which has been described as the "bible" of Southern cooking. That got us thinking if there are any other cookbooks that rise to that level.

At first glance, food policy seems to be an afterthought in the Trump administration. The campaign saw few debates about food or farming. And the president-elect hasn't yet nominated someone to head the Department of Agriculture or the Food and Drug Administration.

Taylor Gantt

Atlanta is home to a number of big time musical artists, including College Park's own 2 Chainz. But many of these musicians have aspirations outside of the recording studio.  

Unbeknownst to many listeners, 2 Chainz has a passion for food. He's the author of the cookbook #MEALTIME. And this week, he's opening up a new restaurant in Atlanta called Escobar. 

haley / Flickr

The food scene in Athens, Georgia is experiencing explosive growth. Restaurants like Five And Ten and The National have put the small city on the culinary map.

Library of Congress

The next time the you open your kitchen cabinets, consider this: a lot of the processed food we eat today started off as food for soldiers. The Army has a long history of culinary innovation that’s trickled down to our homes. We listen back to our conversation with writer Anastacia Marx de Salcedo, author of the book "Combat-Ready Kitchen: How the U.S.

Jean

In a few states, it's legal to make and sell edibles laced with marijuana, but not in Georgia. Recreational marijuana is illegal in Georgia. but that's not stopping some culinary artists working with it in the kitchen.

Asha Gomez: Chef Hates The Word 'Fusion'

Aug 2, 2016
Raftermen Photography

“Fusion” is a popular word these days to describe food. It’s used to refer to cuisine that combines elements from different cultures, but Asha Gomez is not a fan. She’s chef and owner of the restaurant Spice to Table in Atlanta. She says the word “fusion” doesn’t tell the full story of what’s on a plate and it’s time to get rid of it.

 

 

Oyster Renaissance In the South

Jun 7, 2016
The Ordinary

You can serve them fried, steamed, or raw on the half shell. But oysters probably don't immediately come to mind as a food product of Georgia. Now there is an oyster renaissance underway in the South, and the tasty mollusk will be the subject of a class at this weekend's Southern Grown Festival on Sea Island. 

Atlanta Journal-Constitution Photographic Archive

Before Nashville became the world’s country music capitol, a 1920s Atlanta radio program popularized the music beyond the Southeastern United States. Sears & Roebuck broadcast “Dinnerbell R.F.D.” from 1926 to 1928 out of the tower of its massive Atlanta distribution center, today’s Ponce City Market. This weekend, a group of Atlanta musicians and chefs will present a modern interpretation of the live fiddle music show.

Sarah Dorio

Chef Hugh Acheson is a mainstay in the culinary world. Acheson also hopes to change the way that kids interact with food in the classroom by bringing the traditional home economics program back into schools.

Host Celeste Headlee sits down with Acheson to talk about the home-ec curriculum he’s developed and the skills he wants to teach to young students who participate in the course

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