emory university

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Who is Atticus Finch really—an arch-segregationist or a champion of justice? And how do we go about answering that question when going straight to the source isn’t an option?


Courtesy Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

After writing his New York Times op-ed, “Dear White America," George Yancy received hundreds of hateful messages. Yancy, an Emory University professor of philosophy, knew that his letter was controversial, but he says he never thought he would receive literal death threats.

This past April, he released his newest book, "Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America."

Last month, investigators in Atlanta recovered about 500 pounds of methamphetamine hidden inside Disney figurines. That's worth about $2 million. Drug Enforcement Administration officials not only say that Atlanta is a hub for crystal meth distribution; according to the DEA, meth also the "No. 1 threat" in the metro area.

What does it mean to have an awakening? For Christopher Paul Curtis, it meant finding his calling in his 40s. After working for more than a decade in Detroit's automobile manufacturing industry, Curtis began writing children's books about the African American experience. His 1996 novel "The Watsons Go to Birmingham" earned him a John Newbery Medal, making him the first African American man to win this honor. He won again in 2000 for "Bud, Not Buddy" and in 2008 for "Elijah of Buxton." We spoke with Curtis in 2017. 

Courtesy of Kendrick Lamar

This week we talked about mandatory gun owernship laws, Vidalia onions and the Pulitzer Prize — and that doesn't even include the week's news. On Second Thought host Tony Harris sat down with our Breakroom panel to process everything that happened.

Pixabay

The South has a lot of nicknames. "The Bible Belt." "Dixieland." And when it comes to health, we're known as the Stroke Belt.

 

Studies say stroke risk in this 11-state region, which includes Georgia, is 34 percent higher for the general population than elsewhere in the United States.

 

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14. The Rally for Science keynote speaker is Emory University professor Linda DeGutis. She previously served as director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. DeGutis will speak on the importance of gun violence research. We spoke with DeGutis and March for Science organizers Louis Kiphen and Allison Halterman.

It's On Us

College students gathered at Emory University last weekend for RespectCon, a conference that centers on student conversations and the ways they help sexual assault victims find justice.

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a leader in South Africa's anti-apartheid movement and ex-wife of the late Nelson Mandela, died Monday. She was 81. On Second Thought producer Fenly Foxen, who grew up in South Africa, spoke with host Adam Ragusea about Madikizela-Mandela's integral role in the fight against apartheid. Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe, CEO of the TutuDesk Campaign and daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, also joined from South Carolina. Tutu-Gxashe earned her master's degree from Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health. 

GCIS/Flickr

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, a leader in South Africa's anti-apartheid movement and ex-wife of the late Nelson Mandela, died Monday. She was 81. 

On Second Thought producer Fenly Foxen, who grew up in South Africa, spoke with host Adam Ragusea about Madikizela-Mandela's integral role in the fight against apartheid. Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe, CEO of the TutuDesk Campaign and daughter of Archbishop Desmond Tutu, also joined from South Carolina. Tutu-Gxashe earned her master's degree from Emory University's Rollins School of Public Health. 

Chapel Hill Public Library / Flickr

Between 1956 and 1961, "To Kill a Mockingbird" author Harper Lee wrote a series of personal letters, now available to the public at Emory University's Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library.

The letters, written during the same period as Lee wrote "Mockingbird" and "Go Set a Watchman," sheds light on the relationships of a renowned writer who was legendarily private. The correspondence also provides a new look into the civil rights movement-era South in which Lee wrote her novels. 

We talked with Emory University history professor Joe Crespino about these letters. His latest book, "Atticus Finch: The Biography," focuses on the influences that shaped Lee's writing.

Frankenstein has been a popular novel turned movie since it was first published in 1818. 

At Emory University, three Atlanta playwrights took a new look at Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein with modern scientific research. They each contributed to a single show that’s being performed at the Atlanta Science Festival.

On this “Two Way Street,” we’re talking about what dogs think and feel with a neuroscientist who has spent years studying them—Dr. Gregory Berns. His book, “What It’s Like to Be a Dog,” details his years of research on canine cognition.  

Can Going To Church Make You Live Longer?

Jan 31, 2018
guineypub / Flickr

There are all kinds of way to get healthy. You could spend time jogging, doing yoga...or going to church. New research from Emory University finds regular attendance at religious ceremonies can improve one’s health and lower mortality. We talk about this idea with the lead author on that study, Ellen Idler. She’s a Professor of Sociology at Emory University. We also chat with Harold Bennett, Chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion at Morehouse College.

Pixabay / Ben Reiss and Chris Ehlen

This week a group of scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their discoveries related to our circadian rhythms. Emory University professor Ben Reiss joined us in May to talk about his latest exploration of sleep patterns, “Wild Nights: How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World.” We revisit that conversation, then we’re joined in the studio by Assistant Professor of Neuroscience for Morehouse School of Medicine, Chris Ehlen.

Billy Howard

Atlanta is the fifth-highest metro area for new HIV diagnoses, according to federal dataA collection at Emory University sheds light on the HIV/AIDS crisis of the 1980s by showcasing photos by Atlanta photographer Billy Howard.

MarkCiz / flickr

Do you get enough sleep? A good night’s rest can depend on lot of things: your dinner, your kids, where you live, and even your race. A new book by Emory University professor Ben Reiss explores how we got so sleep-obsessed, yet sleep-deprived.

GPB

New research from the Southern Poverty Law Center and Emory University finds cases of alleged bias in the Atlanta Immigration Court. The AIC denies asylum to 98 percent of seekers, by far the highest rate of any immigration court in the nation.

Wikimedia Commons

Belief and fact don’t always line up. An Emory University class dives into the convoluted world of conspiracy theories, and how they influence American politics. We talked with instructor Felix Harcourt and two of his students: Carolyn Koehnke and Laura Marquez.

Emory Law Journal Elects First Black Editor-In-Chief

Mar 7, 2017
Emory Law School

Since its inception in 1952, the Emory Law Journal has never elected a black editor-in-chief — until now.

The college announced Wednesday that Emory University School of Law student Janiel Myers was named to the Journal's highest role.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports () Myers was born in Jamaica and recently naturalized as an American citizen. Myers says she hopes her appointment will help impact the future of diversity at the law school.

At Emory University, the Law School conducts classes you expect — contracts, torts — but it also offers one you might not: Drama. The professor behind it — and before it — is Janet Metzger.  We talked with her and law student Prasad Hurra about the class as part of our series, “Lessons from Left Field."

J. Bettman

Antonio Sanchez began playing drums at age five. He’s since performed and recorded with many jazz legends, including Chick Corea and Pat Metheny.

Never did Sanchez think he would compose music for film until he was approached by director Alejandro González Iñárritu. The two worked together to create the score for the 2014 film "Birdman."

The score, reflective of Sanchez’s talents, is all percussion. He is now on tour, performing the drum score live alongside a screening of the film. He joins us to discuss the new project and talk about how his drumming has evolved.

Google Images

Some of Hollywood’s biggest blockbusters over the past few years have something in common: their characters were born on the pages of comic books and graphic novels.

Liam Daniel / Bleecker Street

A new film called “Denial” starring Rachel Weisz tells the story of the 2000 legal battle between Emory University professor Deborah Lipstadt and British Holocaust denier David Irving. We talked with Lipstadt about the libel case, which garnered international attention.

Emory University

Life has changed dramatically for people with disabilities over the last few decades. But they still face challenges – including how they're represented on and off screen.

Pages