election

Aerial view of the United States Capitol building.
Carol M. Highsmith / Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we ask whether the spectacle playing out in the U.S. Senate tarnished its reputation. This week, the United States Supreme Court began a new term with eight justices sitting on the bench. As the battle over who will fill the next seat continues, how will the court proceed to preserve its reputation and act as a non-partisan arbiter of justice?


Rebecca Hammel / U.S. Senate Photographic Studio

On this edition of Political Rewind, the battle over education plans between the candidates for governor in Georgia heats up on the campaign trail. 


The Governor's Mansion in Atlanta Georgia is a a three-floor, 30-room, Greek Revival style home built in 1967, stands on approximately 18 acres in northeast Atlanta.
www.georgia.gov

On this edition of Political Rewind, as candidates prepare for another week of fundraising and campaign speeches, a new poll from Landmark Communications shows Georgians are evenly divided on which candidate they vote into office on Nov. 6.


Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Georgians are divided and somewhat more in favor of Brett Kavanaughs' Supreme Court nomination than those who oppose it, after hearing from both Kavanaugh and the woman who accused him of sexual assault, Dr. Christine Blasey Ford.  A new poll done by Landmark Communications shows that Georgians currently support the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme court by a margin of 49 percent to 43 percent. 

A new voting machine which prints a paper record sits on display at a polling site in Conyers, Ga.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Federal Judge Amy Totenberg denied a group’s request to require the state to switch to paper ballots. Georgia’s 27,000 electronic voting machines will remain in use for November’s election. But she said that Georgia's election officials have "buried their heads in the sand" on the issue of voting vulnerabilities.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Stephanie McClure, a professor of sociology at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville, had a simple plan.

She and other members of the Middle Georgia Progressive Women activist group would head out to a Baldwin County High School football game with a stack of voter registration forms and sign people up. But when a friend went to the office of the Baldwin County Registrar to pick up the forms, they hit a road block. The forms asked for proof of residency, such as a photo ID, to register.

  

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, a guilty plea in New York, a conviction in Virginia and a sentencing in Augusta. How will Georgia representatives and candidates for Governor react to the news? 


One day after the group Georgians for the Impeachment of Donald Trump paid to have a billboard put up along St. Augustine Road in Valdosta, the Impeach Trump sign was taken down, according to the group's Facebook page
(Thomas Hochschild/Facebook)

On this edition of Political Rewind, two political controversies have plagued South Georgia.

The anger over a proposal to close most of the polling places in Randolph County is making national headlines and sparking continued allegations of voter suppression. Meanwhile, in Valdosta, a billboard advertising an 'Impeach Trump’ website survives just 24 hours before community pressure forces it down.


GPB News

How do you build an economy? From the top down or the ground up?

The major party candidates to be Georgia’s next governor offered their answers those questions at the annual Georgia Chamber of Commerce Luncheon in Macon Tuesday.

In her speech before the Chamber, Democrat Stacey Abrams floated ideas like a $10 million state fund for small business investment, money to be spent on wraparound services in public schools and Medicaid expansion as ideas for building economic capacity from the ground up. She called Medicaid expansion a bipartisan issue.

Georgia State Capitol
GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, a special election for Ohio’s 12th Congressional District was “too close to call” on Tuesday night. Vying for a congressional seat that has been held by a Republican for three decades, Trump-backed Republican Troy Balderson and Democrat Danny O'Connor have put GOP congressional campaigns across the country on alert. 


President Trump shakes hands with Ohio 12th District Republican nominee Troy Balderson during a rally last weekend in Lewis Center, Ohio.
(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the panel takes a look at a new attack ad against Stacey Abrams calling her a "Bloomberg-Soros Hate America Leftist." Meanwhile, Abrams uses an appearance on national television to attack Brian Kemp on his job performance as Georgia's Secretary of State. 


Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photos/John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Stacey Abrams modifies her position on sandblasting the Confederate leaders carved on the face of Stone Mountain. Brian Kemp faces more criticism of how his office is dealing with election security issues.


Political Rewind: Russian Hacking Beyond Elections

Aug 3, 2018
Feb. 13, 2013 Georgia Power crewman goes through the process of restoring power to a neighborhood as he works on a line, in Riverdale, Ga.
(AP Photo/John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, emails obtained by a voter security group show that Georgia officials knew about “critical vulnerabilities” in the electronic voting system less than a month before the November election. While the threat of Russian interference in US elections remains a top concern, should Georgia and other states across the country also be concerned about other areas of vulnerability?


(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, how has President Trump’s surprise endorsement of Brian Kemp reshaped the GOP governor’s race?  Why did Trump decide to weigh in on a Republican primary contest and can Casey Cagle craft a winning response? 


(AP Photos/John Bazemore, Todd Kirkland, John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the race for governor of Georgia moves one step down the road.  Democratic voters advance Stacey Abrams to the general election in overwhelming fashion, while Republicans set the stage for a fight for the soul of their party, a runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp.  Runoffs will also determine which candidates will face GOP congressional incumbents some see as vulnerable in the fall.  Our panel of insiders break down the vote and look at what to expect as they 2018 election marches towards November.

Panelists:

Grant Blankenship/GPB

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, it’s Election Day in Georgia as voters go to the polls to make their choices in dozens of races.  Democrats will pick their nominee for governor and no matter who wins, it will be the first time ever in Georgia that a woman will lead a party’s ticket into the Fall.  Republicans may send their governor’s race to a mid-summer runoff, which means they’ll endure nine more weeks of campaigning before they can turn their attention to the winning in November.  Also, two potentially vulnerable GOP incumbent members of Congress will be eyeing the results

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, voters across Georgia go to the polls tomorrow to elect candidates in dozens of primary races.  Which Stacey will emerge as the Democratic candidate for governor?

Researcher Finds Georgia Voter Records Exposed On Internet

Jun 15, 2017
Alex Sanz / AP Photo/File

A security researcher disclosed a gaping security hole at the outfit that manages Georgia's election technology, days before the state holds a closely watched congressional runoff vote on June 20.

The security failure left the state's 6.7 million voter records and other sensitive files exposed to hackers, and may have been left unpatched for seven months. The revealed files might have allowed attackers to plant malware and possibly rig votes or wreak chaos with voter rolls during elections.

Joel McLendon / flickr

With a week to go until Election Day, more than a million early ballots have been cast in Georgia. There are many Georgians who are voting for the first time, but some residents say the nastiness of the presidential race has tainted the experience.  

 

The deadline to register to vote in Georgia is Tuesday, Oct. 9.
Joel McLendon / flickr

The small town of Sparta, Georgia made headlines earlier this year over accusations the county board of elections targeted black voters to purge them from voters rolls. We hear one voter’s account of what happened. Then, this type of action would have once needed the approval of the U.S.

Joseph Shapiro / NPR

A class-action lawsuit filed last week alleges 13 cities in St. Louis County, Missouri put people behind bars because they couldn't afford to pay court fines. The fines included tickets for minor offenses like traffic violations. The Arch City Defenders is the nonprofit law firm behind the suit.

Cindy Hill / GPB News

In the Chatham County primaries on May 24, several candidates are challenging the incumbents. It echoes the push to shake up the status quo in last year’s Savannah municipal elections, which saw incumbents ousted in three races. GPB spoke with Savannah State University professor Allyne Tosca Owens about the incumbent backlash and what’s motivating that dynamic.