Education

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How many times per year does a gun go off in an American school?

We should know. But we don't.

This spring the U.S. Education Department reported that in the 2015-2016 school year, "nearly 240 schools ... reported at least 1 incident involving a school-related shooting." The number is far higher than most other estimates.

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3 Ways Education Is Influencing Arizona's Midterms

Aug 27, 2018

In Arizona, the energy around education issues that sprang up in April during the teacher protest walk-outs is still in the air leading up to the primary election Tuesday.

Arizona was the fourth state where thousands of teachers walked out of the classroom to protest low wages and under-funded schools.

Updated at 1:12 p.m. ET

The federal official in charge of protecting student borrowers from predatory lending practices has stepped down.

In a scathing resignation letter, Seth Frotman, who until now was the student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, says current leadership "has turned its back on young people and their financial futures." The letter was addressed to Mick Mulvaney, the bureau's acting director.

Police in North Carolina arrested seven people at protests for and against the presence of a Confederate soldier statue at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, the university said.

About 100 people faced off in "highly charged" demonstrations at the university's McCorkle Place — where until a group of protesters pulled it down on Monday, the statue known as "Silent Sam" had stood for more than a century.

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New York University's School of Medicine is learning that no good deed goes unpunished.

The highly ranked medical school announced with much fanfare this month that it is raising $600 million from private donors to eliminate tuition for all its students — even providing refunds to those currently enrolled. Before the announcement, annual tuition at the school was $55,018.

Ohio State University says it is suspending Head Football Coach Urban Meyer along with Athletics Director Gene Smith in response to how the two handled allegations of domestic abuse made against an assistant coach.

Meyer fired Zach Smith, an assistant coach, on July 23 after learning of reports that Smith's ex-wife Courtney Smith had been given a domestic violence civil protection order against him a few days before.

For Ashley Trebisacci, studying abroad was a life-changing experience. Her time at Oxford University expanded her worldview and helped her grow as a person — but more than that, she discovered her queer identity, and met the woman she now plans to marry.

It's the first week of class in a new school in Sumter County, Ala., and some fourth-graders are getting to know each other. They have pieces of colored paper they can do anything they want with — the idea is to be creative. Teacher Morri Mordecai cheers them on.

"They put theirs together and said it represented a rainbow," she says, pointing to one group. "Is that not cool?"

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We're going to turn now to another religious community in the United States. Kat Chow of NPR's Code Switch team reports on a camp that draws a hundred kids from all across the country who are part of the Sikh religion.

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An elite boarding school in Connecticut is acknowledging sexual abuse by seven now-former staffers against 16 students — going back as far as 1969 and lasting until 1992.

The Hotchkiss School in Lakeville, Conn., is a private high school of about 600 students.

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Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Story Behind The Numbers.

About Hanna Rosin's TED Talk

Post-recession, journalist Hanna Rosin noticed an economic shift: jobs dominated by men were on the decline, jobs dominated by women were on the rise. But does that data signify meaningful progress?

About Hanna Rosin

Victoria Gomez waits at a "checkout" table as two volunteers count up her finds: puzzles, felt, storage bins and wooden shelves. "My last [credit] card bill was $1,000 and that's just from last month, just for school supplies and things for my classroom," she tells them.

Gomez is now a kindergarten teacher at The Chatsworth School in Baltimore County. In her two years as a teacher, she has switched grade levels three times.

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In a move it said was to address the large cost of entering a career in medicine, New York University's School of Medicine said Thursday that it will offer full scholarships to all current and future students in its doctor of medicine program.

NYU said it was the "only top 10-ranked" medical school in the U.S. to offer such a generous package.

Lies My Teacher Told Me

Aug 16, 2018

“The American Journey” is a classroom staple. The textbook has been described as a ‘superb, readable presentation of American history, from pre-exploration to the present.’ It is read by millions who are often tested on its contents every year.

But sociologist James Loewen discovered that the 2015 edition of the book contained passages like this one, about The Civil War.

The Future Of For-Profit Colleges

Aug 16, 2018

Higher education facilities like the University of Phoenix and Capella Universities have been heavily scrutinized by journalists and the federal government alike.

That’s because they are for-profit colleges. But under Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, regulations around them may change.

On Friday, DeVos’ administration moved to eliminate a rule that required for-profit college to demonstrate that enrolled students can be gainfully employed.

Summer is not over yet, but many parents are getting ready to send their kids off to college.

It's one of those major turning points in life, not just for kids but also for parents, especially those are who are saying goodbye to their last or only child: They are about to become empty nesters.

Is your last child moving out of the house to go to college? If so, NPR's Morning Edition wants to hear from you. Please share your story with us below, or here. An NPR producer may follow up with you.

As students prepare to go back to school, more and more parents are thinking about school safety. A recent poll found 34 percent of parents fear for their child's physical safety at school. That's almost triple the number of parents from 2013.

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Well, it is back to school season. Millions of teachers across this country are getting their lesson plans together. They're decorating their bulletin boards. Others, though, are busy elsewhere, like on the campaign trail.

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And now to a parent of Parkland students. One, Patrick, is a senior there this year. Another, 14-year-old Alaina, was one of the students killed in the shooting in February. Their father, Ryan Petty, joins us now. Hey, Mr. Petty.

Here’s a new phrase for you: “The Googlification of the classroom.” Tech reporter Natasha Singer covered it for The New York Times in 2017.

She wrote that Chicago Public Schools, the third-largest school district in the country has been at the forefront of introducing the tech giant’s low-cost and free tools into the classroom.

Google bypassed administrators and school boards, reaching out directly to educators, she wrote, and it raises the question of whether our public schools should “turn out knowledgeable citizens or skilled workers.”

Sandy Hook. Marjory Stoneman Douglas. Columbine.

These names are synonymous with the terror of a school shooting.

But the amount of school shootings isn’t growing, despite enhanced fear.

NPR spoke to an expert who has done research on school shootings.

A Colorado school district intent on saving money has cut one of its greatest costs: teaching.

In Defense Of The (Liberal) Arts

Aug 14, 2018

A concept familiar to those in business and finance is cropping up more often in college searches: ROI, or return on investment. No longer limited to investment banking, parents, students and educators across the nation are now wondering whether all degrees are created equal, especially in light of expensive college costs.

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