Columbus

Left: Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., during a town hall event, in Natick, Mass. Right: Donald Trump Jr. speaks at a rally in Orlando, Fla.
Steven Senne, John Raoux / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, new polls continue to predict that Democrats will make strong gains in the United States House of Representatives and potentially take a majority after the 2018 Midterm Elections. Are Georgia’s Democratic congressional candidates going to follow the national trend or will the state’s voters keep incumbent Republicans in office?


Political Rewind: Campaign Fundraising Breaks Records

Oct 9, 2018
Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photos/John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, candidates for governor in Georgia continue to break campaign finance records. Reports show that Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp have collected more than $20 million in campaign contributions just this summer. With less than a month until Election Day, how will the candidates spend their cash?


Reagan: An American Journey
Bob Spitz

On this edition of Political Rewind, author Bob Spitz details the legacy of the 40th U.S. President Ronald Reagan. The parallels between Reagan and Donald Trump are clear, but so are the contrasts in their style of leadership and the emotional chords they struck in the American people

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Left, Brian Kemp poses with supporters in Middle Georgia. RIght, Stacey Abrams poses with singer-songwriter John Legend
@BrianKempGA / @StaceyAbrams / Twitter

On this edition of Political Rewind, it's Hollywood versus Hawkinsville on the campaign trail. Democrat Stacey Abrams hopes support from celebrity names will energize young voters while Republican candidate Brian Kemp looks for votes closer to home during his rural county bus tour. Which strategy will prevail? 

The Senate voted Friday to end debate on Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court. What impact will the bitter fight over the nomination process have on the midterm elections?

Panelists:

Stacey Evans -- Former Gubernatorial Candidate

Aerial view of the United States Capitol building.
Carol M. Highsmith / Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we ask whether the spectacle playing out in the U.S. Senate tarnished its reputation. This week, the United States Supreme Court began a new term with eight justices sitting on the bench. As the battle over who will fill the next seat continues, how will the court proceed to preserve its reputation and act as a non-partisan arbiter of justice?


Rebecca Hammel / U.S. Senate Photographic Studio

On this edition of Political Rewind, the battle over education plans between the candidates for governor in Georgia heats up on the campaign trail. 


The Governor's Mansion in Atlanta Georgia is a a three-floor, 30-room, Greek Revival style home built in 1967, stands on approximately 18 acres in northeast Atlanta.
www.georgia.gov

On this edition of Political Rewind, as candidates prepare for another week of fundraising and campaign speeches, a new poll from Landmark Communications shows Georgians are evenly divided on which candidate they vote into office on Nov. 6.


Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Georgians are divided and somewhat more in favor of Brett Kavanaughs' Supreme Court nomination than those who oppose it, after hearing from both Kavanaugh and the woman who accused him of sexual assault, Dr. Christine Blasey Ford.  A new poll done by Landmark Communications shows that Georgians currently support the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme court by a margin of 49 percent to 43 percent. 

Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photos/John Amis, File)

A new poll released Monday by Landmark Communications shows no clear leader in the race for governor in Georgia. Republican Brian Kemp currently leads Democrat Stacey Abrams by a margin of 48 to 46 percent.

The statewide poll asked 964 likely voters who they would vote for if the election were today. Although Kemp leads by 1.7 percentage points, the poll has a 3.2 percent margin of error, meaning the race is a virtual tie.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, education becomes a forefront issue on the campaign trail in Georgia. What will each candidate offer and how will their proposals improve rural education without causing large tax increases? 


Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets Sen. David Perdue on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, our panel recaps the latest updates from a contentious week on capitol hill. How are Republican politicians in Georgia responding to the emotional testimony from both Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh?


GOP candidate for governor Brian Kemp.
Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp hopes to give public school teachers in Georgia a raise. The Republican candidate for governor says he will give teachers a permanent $5,000 annual pay raise, a plan that would cost taxpayers around $600 million a year.


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, after running three years behind and several billion dollars over budget, partners in Georgia Powers Plant Vogtle Nuclear Plant vote to continue funding the expansion project. Critics have fought against Vogtle's expansion, citing cost and safety concerns. We discuss whether or not the future of the project is in danger. 


The deadline to register to vote in Georgia is Tuesday, Oct. 9.
Joel McLendon / flickr

The midterm elections are 42 days away and Tuesday, National Voter Registration Day, serves as a timely reminder to submit your registration information to be eligible to participate in the November contest. 

If you haven't registered to vote yet, you still have two weeks before the Tuesday, October 9 deadline. 

AP Photo/John Amis

GOP gubernatorial candidate under fire for a secret recording, in which he admits he used legislation to undermine a primary opponent. And why did former rival Clay Tippins record and leak the tape? Our panel has answers.


On this edition of "Two Way Street," we sit down with four smart, well read Georgians to discuss their favorite books. This conversation picks up the discussion started by "The Great American Read," an eight-part PBS series that unpacks a diverse list of 100 books. "The Great American Read" premieres Tuesday May 22 at 8 PM on GPB. 

Courtesy Naia Izumi

You might recognize Naia Izumi if you're from Columbus, Georgia. Izumi is winner of NPR's 2018 Tiny Desk Contest. He started playing guitar when he was just a kid living in Columbus.

 

Izumi now lives in Los Angeles. He wrote the song “Soft Spoken” for the Tiny Desk Concert Contest on YouTube. The video submission has been viewed nearly 200,000 times.

 

Following this win, Izumi says he hopes to win a few Grammys and perform at different venues around the world.

AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

On this edition of "Two Way Street," we're asking the question—who is Atticus Finch?

He was a beloved champion of justice in “To Kill a Mockingbird” but a bigot in “Go Set a Watchman.”

Matthew Murphy

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to Tony-award winning director, Kenny Leon, about his Broadway revival of the play, “Children of a Lesser God.”

Jim McGuire

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re talking to the “royal family of roots music,”  Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn, about their new album, “Echo in the Valley.” This is their second collaboration, following the success of their self-titled debut, “Béla

Columbus Ends Fees For People Who Drop Abuse Allegations

Oct 13, 2017
Peter / Flickr/CC

The city of Columbus, Georgia has agreed to stop making alleged victims in domestic violence cases pay fees when they decline to participate in prosecutions.

The city also agreed to repay $41,844 in fees and damages for the 101 people it charged when they decided not to press charges against their alleged abusers.

Federal Judge Clay Land approved these terms in a class action settlement of a lawsuit filed by the Southern Center for Human Rights in October 2016 against the city of Columbus, a local judge and several law enforcement officers.

Today on “Political Rewind,” we talk to two Georgia mayors: Rusty Paul, the Republican mayor of Sandy Springs and Teresa Tomlinson, the Democratic mayor of Columbus. What problems do they share in common? Lack of modern infrastructure? A need for a better mix of transportation options? Affordable housing? Do they believe Georgia is on the right track for growth?