City of Atlanta

From Left: President Bill Clinton, Former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, President Barack Obama
(AP Photo/Greg Gibson, John Bazemore, Carolyn Kaster)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport has been the city’s most lucrative asset. But will scandals and security issues further prompt the state legislatures attempt to take control of the world’s busiest airport?

Investigative Reporters and Editors

The city of Atlanta has received many honors over the years. In 1996, we were awarded the Summer Olympics. Next year, we'll host the Super Bowl. And this past weekend, Atlanta received the Golden Padlock Award. Given each year by a committee of investigative reporters and editors, that dubious distinction is awarded every year to the most secretive government agency or official.


The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years. Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters. At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. Senate Bill 315 defines unauthorized computer access as a crime under Georgia law, which would make data breaches easier to prosecute. Some people in the tech industry, however, worry SB 315 could actually hinder their ability to do their jobs.

Connor Carey / Wikimedia Commons

The ransomware attack that crippled Atlanta a few weeks ago isn't the only high-profile cyberattack Georgia has faced in recent years.

Two years ago, a security researcher gained unauthorized access to a server used by Kennesaw State University's Center for Election Systems, which stores the data of millions of Georgia voters.

At the time, the data breach wasn't illegal under Georgia law —  but a new bill awaiting Gov. Nathan Deal's signature could change that. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, the 2018 session of the Georgia General Assembly was gaveled to a close late last night.  What did lawmakers do about measures to crack down on distracted driving, to expand transit across metro Atlanta, or to boost the chances for economic growth in rural Georgia?  We’ll look at these and other accomplishments under the “Gold Dome” this year.  Then, with the session now finished, the sprint to the May primary elections is now under way.  We’ll look at where the top races stand right now.  Plus, the City of Atlanta has been paralyzed by one of the bigges

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The City of Atlanta is still dealing with the fallout from a massive cyberattack Thursday.

Since a group of hackers locked down the city's computer system with a malware called Ransomware, city employees have been unable to carry out essential business. Atlanta residents can't even pay their bills online. 

Those behind the attack are demanding about $50,000 in exchange for the city to regain access to its data.

Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms has condemned the attack. She has yet to confirm if the city will pay the ransom. In the meantime Atlanta officials have resorted to filling out paperwork by hand. 

Emily Cureton, GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, free speech issues.  Students in Georgia and across the country walk out of classes to show support for passage of gun safety laws?  Will they have an impact on the legislature here or in the halls of Congress?  What about students who were denied permission to walk?  Then, Governor Deal reverses a state order denying gun protestors access to a free speech area at the State Capitol.  What led him to overrule the Georgia Building Authority decision?  Plus, Georgia’s Attorney General launches an investigation into an apparent effort by staffers for former