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Courtesy of Georgia Building Authority

Today on “Political Rewind,” nearly half a century after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., the state of Georgia is unveiling a statue of the civil rights leader at the Capitol on Monday. Ironically, the statue will be dedicated even as the fate of memorials to the Confederacy is once again being debated fiercely here and across the country.

Major Georgia Newspapers Shift Ownership

Aug 25, 2017
Branden Camp / AP Photo

Morris Publishing announced this month it would sell ownership of 11 daily newspapers in the Southeast to Gatehouse Media. The sale includes large local Georgia papers like the Augusta Chronicle, the Athens Banner-Herald, and the Savannah Morning News. We talk about what’s behind the sale with Carolyn Carlson, a Professor of Communications and Media at Kennesaw State University. And Phil Kent, CEO of Insider Advantage, and a former editor at the Augusta Chronicle.

Morris Publishing announced this month it would sell ownership of 11 daily newspapers in the Southeast to Gatehouse Media. The sale includes large local Georgia papers like the Augusta Chronicle, the Athens Banner-Herald, and the Savannah Morning News. We talk about what’s behind the sale with Carolyn Carlson, a Professor of Communications and Media at Kennesaw State University. And Phil Kent, CEO of Insider Advantage, and a former editor at the Augusta Chronicle.

Jessica Gurell / GPB

Drugs like fentanyl aren’t just creating new risks for human police officers. The dogs who use their powerful noses to sniff out drugs are inhaling the dangerous synthetic opioids as well. So police departments are taking new steps to protect their dogs – and respond if the K-9s get sick.

Normally, it’s a police dog’s job to protect its handler, not the other way around. If you’re a police dog and somebody runs at your human waving a weapon, there’s only one response: you attack.

 

Jessica Gurell / GPB

New Jersey police detective Eric Price came in contact with fentanyl while doing his job.

“I felt like my body was shutting down,” Price said. “People around me said that I looked really white and lost color, and it just really felt like, I thought I was dying.”

Devin Pedde / Courtesy of APHC

Today on "Two Way Street," we talk with new "A Prairie Home Companion" host Chris Thile. Last October, Thile took over the APHC stage from Garrison Keillor, who hosted the show for over four decades. What is his relationship with Keillor like now? Thile tells us what kind of mentor Keillor has been.

flake.senate.gov

Today on “Political Rewind,” we talk with Senator Jeff Flake of Arizona. He’s one of the very few Republicans on Capitol Hill who has been consistent in criticizing President Trump’s demeanor in office.

Billy Payne Retiring As Masters, Augusta National Chairman

Aug 23, 2017
Jae C. Hong / AP Photo/File

Billy Payne is retiring as chairman of Augusta National and the Masters, ending 11 years of substantial change that included the club having its first female members and playing a leading role in growing the game around the world.

It’s been two weeks since the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia. The violence there renewed conversations about race relations, and have left some searching for answers on how to de-radicalize people. That’s something Shannon Martinez of Athens knows firsthand. She was a skinhead for several years, but managed to leave that life behind her.  We talk with her and Sammy Rangel of Life After Hate, a group that helps people move away from hate and violent extremism.

For centuries, groups in the South have sought to secede from the United States. More than 150 years after the Civil War, groups like the League of the South are pushing again to break from the Union. We talk about how serious we should take calls for secession with Roxanne Donovan, Psychology Professor at Kennesaw State University. And Trey Hood, Political Science Professor at the University of Georgia in Athens.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” presidential advisor Steve Bannon is out. What led to his departure? How will President Trump’s nationalist supporters respond to their favorite West Wing advisor?

Photo: Jason Thrasher

John T. Edge is the director of the Southern Foodways Alliance. Based out of the University of Mississippi, the SFA studies and documents Southern food cultures. A respected authority, Edge writes about Southern food and culture for publications such as Garden & Gun Magazine and The Oxford American.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind” we look at the fallout over the past five days from the violent confrontations in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend.

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Georgia's senior U.S. senator Johnny Isakson joins us in the studio.

CHIP SOMODEVILLA / GETTY IMAGES

Jimmy Carter sings the praises of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams; but then says it wasn’t an endorsement and that he will back whoever wins the Democratic nomination.

At an event here in Georgia, GOP candidate for governor Michael Williams wins the endorsement of staunch Trump supporter Roger Stone.

The Alabama special election to replace Jeff Sessions in the U.S. Senate becomes a battle to test the popularity of President Trump and of Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. 

Nuclear Threat Initiative

Our guest on today’s show is former Georgia U.S. Senator Sam Nunn. Nunn served in the U.S. senate for 24 years. He was the chairman of the prestigious Armed Services Committee and of the Permanent Sub-Committee on Investigations. After retiring from the senate in 1997, he became the founder of the Nuclear Threat Initiative, a non-profit organization dedicated to preventing catastrophic attacks with weapons of mass destruction.

Are some of the Republican Party’s top stars beginning to pave the way to run for president in 2020 if Donald Trump steps aside? On today’s show we’ll talk about a New York Times report that Vice President Mike Pence, Ohio Governor John Kasich, and senators Tom Cotton and Ben Sasse are beginning to make the kind of moves that could position them to be ready for a run.  The story has infuriated the Vice President, who says it’s not true. But is it? Our panel weighs in.

Money And Kids

Aug 7, 2017

This month, Matt and Michael dive into the often controversial and challenging topic of "kids and money", not just the expense of having kids but teaching them the important issues associated with managing resources. Our hosts, found this topic actually required more than 30 minutes to discuss, so this is part one of two.

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Today on “Political Rewind,“ what comes next for the Plant Vogtle expansion? The $25 billion project has been in the works for years, but the builders – Westinghouse, a subsidiary of Toshiba – went bankrupt and future completion is questionable. Georgia Power customers have already paid additional fees for construction of the plant; what happens next? Public Service Commissioner Tim Echols joins us to discuss where we are and what it will take to move forward.

Hussein Malla / AP Photo

This week on “Two Way Street,” Lawrence Wright joined us in front of a live audience at the Atlanta History Center to discuss his new book, ”The Terror Years: From al-Qaeda to the Islamic State.”

Alex Brandon / AP Photo/File

Today on “Political Rewind,” President Trump signs the Russian sanctions bill, but gripes that parts of it are "clearly unconstitutional." What are his reservations?

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” it's not over ‘til it's over. President Trump indicates he's not ready to let go of the health care issue and sends his OMB Director Mick Mulvaney out to say that Congress shouldn't even think about going home until they get something done. What happens next?

Alex Brandon / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” the effort to repeal and replace Obamacare collapses in the wee hours, after Sen. John McCain delivers the coup de grace and votes NO. Was it payback for that campaign crack when Trump dissed McCain for having been captured during the Vietnam War? What does this legislative loss bode for Senate Leader Mitch McConnell? And is there a prayer that a return to bipartisanship may be borne of this event?

Elena Seibert

This week on "Two Way Street," Pulitzer Prize-winning author Richard Russo joins us to discuss his latest book, "Trajectory: Stories." 

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” President Trump does an about-face on an Obama-era ruling allowing transgender people to serve in the military.

Ron Sachs / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner testifies in a closed-door session with the Senate Intelligence Committee. No reporters were allowed, but in a prepared statement, Kushner asserted that he has not colluded with Russians. We discuss today's events and his planned appearance tomorrow with House Intelligence Committee another closed-door session. At least one observer opines that Kushner managed to throw Donald Trump Jr. under the bus in his prepared remarks.

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP/Getty Images

Today on “Political Rewind,” the week ends with a bang! Sean Spicer, the long-beleaguered White House Press Secretary, abruptly resigns from his post. Was the appointment of Anthony Scaramucci as the new White House Communications Director the reason for Spicer quitting?

Grant Blankenship / GPB

On average, scores released in the 2017 Georgia Milestones end of year test show incremental but positive improvement for schools across the state. Look past the big picture, though, and schools still have ground to make up. 

Take third grade literacy, largely held as one of the best predictors of future academic achievement. Third grade literacy ranged from being almost universal in some suburban schools to being largely absent elsewhere.

Courtesy Jan Smith Studios

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we go behind the scenes of the recording business and talk to the Atlanta vocal trainer who has nurtured the careers of some of the biggest artists in popular music.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” the Senate fumbles on health care, but President Trump tries to recover. Will a lunchtime meeting put a bill back in play? Our panel looks at the latest iteration of the attempt to repeal and replace Obamacare and what it means for those of us who rely on medical insurance. Our panel voted to draft Georgia Sen. Johnny Isakson, already lauded for his bipartisanship by the New York Times, to lead the way forward.

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