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Daylight saving time ends this Sunday, which means we'll be getting back that hour of sleep we lost in March. Why do we turn our clocks back? We're getting to the bottom of that and more this week on "Two Way Street." On today's show, we hear from historian Michael O'Malley on the topic of time.

Georgia Attorney General Quits Defense In Server Wiping Case

Nov 2, 2017
Alex Sanz / AP Photo

The Georgia attorney general's office will no longer represent the state's top elections official in an elections integrity lawsuit filed three days before a crucial computer server was quietly wiped clean.

The lawsuit aims to force Georgia to retire its antiquated and heavily questioned touchscreen election technology, which does not provide an auditable paper trail.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the first indictments in the Russia collusion probe remain the chief pre-occupation in Washington, even as the president and the GOP try to shift focus to tax reform and a crucial Trump trip to Asia. Our panel will look at the latest developments in the Mueller probe and weigh in on emerging details in the tax plan. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly is under fire for his comments on the causes of the Civil War and the general who led the Confederate Army.

(AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," in this era of Donald Trump, is the “right” losing its mind? The popular conservative commentator Charlie Sykes thinks so, and he’s written a book to make the case. We talk with Sykes about the book and about the breaking news that’s sending tremors across Washington: Paul Manafort, Trump’s former campaign chairman, has surrendered to the FBI. He and his top aide are the first two handed indictments in the Special Counsel’s Russia probe.

ALEX SANZ / AP PHOTO

On this edition of "Political Rewind," how did voter data end up being erased from state computers even as a lawsuit challenging the integrity of Georgia elections was underway? It’s a story that could haunt top candidates in next year’s statewide elections. Also, President Trump speaks out about the opioid crisis. Did he make it clear he’s ready to commit the resources necessary to make an impact? It matters in Georgia, where the crisis looms large. Plus, Obamacare rates are out for 2018, and Georgians will pay more than people in many other states.

Panelists:

St. Martin's Press

Platinum-selling songwriter Jimmy Webb stopped by our studio last month to talk about his first memoir, "The Cake And The Rain." Artists from Frank Sinatra to Barbara Streisand have recorded Webb's songs. Some of his hits include “Up, Up and Away,” “Wichita Lineman,” “MacArthur Park,” and “By The Time I Get to Phoenix.”

Congress In Chaos?

Oct 25, 2017
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," is Congress in chaos? Arizona Senator Jeff Flake says he won’t run for re-election just hours after Senator Bob Corker unloads on President Donald Trump. Where does the dissension leave the GOP’s push for tax cuts and how serious is the fracture in the Republican Party?

Civil Rights Group: School Retaliated Against Cheerleaders

Oct 25, 2017
Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

A national civil rights group says it has "grave concerns" about actions taken by a Georgia university after five black cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem at a football game.

Alex Sanz / AP Photo

Today on "Political Rewind," former President Jimmy Carter wants to help try and end the crisis with North Korea. Will President Trump let him do it? Carter and Trump are different in many ways, but they also have a lot in common. We discuss. 

Experts: Opioid Crisis Is Hitting Georgia Especially Hard

Oct 23, 2017
johnofhammond / Flickr/CC

The nation's deepening opioid epidemic is hitting Georgia harder than most states, experts say.

That's one of the messages that came out of a recent conference at the University of Georgia.

Some of the highest opioid use is in the Rust Belt and the Southeast, authorities said.

Georgia Town Honors Graves Of More Than 1,100 Blacks

Oct 23, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

Discriminated against in life, they were forgotten by their community in death, buried in unmarked graves in the back of the Alta Vista Cemetery in Gainesville, Georgia.

The final resting places of the 1,146 black souls who once lived and worked there were anonymous. Though loved ones may have initially marked the spots with a homemade wooden cross or only a rock, the fragile tributes were lost to time.

Georgia Rep. Price Says HIV Comments Taken Out Of Context

Oct 23, 2017
house.ga.gov

Georgia Rep. Betty Price says her comments on people with HIV that ignited a national firestorm were "taken completely out of context."

Price, the wife of former U.S. Health Secretary Tom Price, was in a legislative committee meeting Tuesday when she asked a state health official whether people with HIV could legally be quarantined.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports Price said Saturday that she was just being "provocative."

David Goldman / AP Photo

On today’s "Political Rewind" we look at where the GOP race for governor stands in these early days of the contest. A new poll shows Lt. Governor Casey Cagle with a significant lead. But the poll reveals a surprising result in the battle for second place.

Emails: Protests Spur College Officials To Talk With Players

Oct 20, 2017
Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

As protests over racial injustice grab national attention in pro sports, some college and university officials are having pre-emptive talks with student-athletes and consulting each other amid concerns that such actions will spread to college sports, according to emails released Thursday.

After five black cheerleaders at Kennesaw State University knelt during the national anthem at a September football game, athletic officials there sought advice from their counterparts at schools including the University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, Duke University and Purdue University.

This week on "Two Way Street," we're listening back to three of our conversations with some of the bravest, most inventive women to ever step into our studio: writers Molly Brodak and Melissa Febos, and robotics engineer Ayanna Howard.

kennesaw.edu

On today's Political Rewind, the national debate over athletes and the national anthem lands on the football field at Kennesaw State University. Does newly released evidence show that political pressure shut down protesting cheerleaders? Also, a high level Stacey Abrams campaign official appears on Russian media that is part of the FBI's investigation of organizations that tried to influence last year's presidential election. We also discuss the feud between the president and the family of a fallen U.S. serviceman.

Panelists:

Relatives: Zell Miller No Longer Making Public Appearances

Oct 18, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Relatives of Zell Miller say he will no longer make public appearances as he deals with health challenges.

The 85-year-old former Georgia governor and U.S. senator took a fall at a Young Harris College basketball game in February 2016.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that tests at a hospital later found proteins associated with Parkinson's with Lewy bodies — a form of the disease associated with dementia.

His grandson Bryan Miller said he is experiencing "the cognitive symptoms that are associated with this type of Parkinson's."

Guilty Plea But No Jail For Jewel Thief Doris Payne, 87

Oct 18, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

A notorious jewel thief recently arrested at a Georgia Walmart store got no jail time during her latest court appearance.

Doris Payne, at 87, has stolen about $2 million in jewels over the last six decades. She was arrested July 17 for a misdemeanor shoplifting charge after a Walmart employee said she tried to leave the suburban Atlanta store with items she hadn't paid for.

Emily Jones / GPB News

As debate flares over Confederate monuments around the country, one church in coastal South Carolina is building a memorial to Harriet Tubman. A model was unveiled Tuesday.

Jeff Martin / AP Photo/File

The student who wears the owl mascot costume at a Georgia public university where five cheerleaders knelt during the national anthem had no business leading a cross-campus march in support of the cheerleaders, an influential lawmaker said.

Kenneth Sturkey, who dresses as Scrappy the Owl at Kennesaw State University athletic events, said he donned the costume without permission for Monday's rally on behalf of cheerleaders who knelt at a game Sept. 30 to protest racial inequality.

“Dear Martin,” a new novel by Atlanta author Nic Stone explores police violence against people of color, through the eyes of a teenage boy. 

"I really wrote it for my sons, they’re one and five…  And eventually, in 10 years, there are still going to be people who look at my sons and see a threat, instead of a kid. And I want them to be able to navigate this world that we live in,” says Stone. 

David Goldman / AP Photo/File

On today's "Political Rewind," we take a closer look at just what President Trump’s executive orders on health care really mean for assuring quality insurance coverage. Who are the winners and losers in the deal? How will it affect Georgians? Andy Miller of "Georgia Health News" helps illuminate the issues.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

Today on “Political Rewind,” Delta Airlines CEO Edward Bastain is bristling at a few Trump administration policies that he says will hurt the company. It’s the first time the company has expressed deep concern with the president. Our panel talks about the friction.

Then: negotiations on a new NAFTA agreement break down, Georgia farmers could pay a steep price for failure to strike a deal. How much will tariffs hurt agriculture exports, especially in the North Georgia poultry industry?

Columbus Ends Fees For People Who Drop Abuse Allegations

Oct 13, 2017
Peter / Flickr/CC

The city of Columbus, Georgia has agreed to stop making alleged victims in domestic violence cases pay fees when they decline to participate in prosecutions.

The city also agreed to repay $41,844 in fees and damages for the 101 people it charged when they decided not to press charges against their alleged abusers.

Federal Judge Clay Land approved these terms in a class action settlement of a lawsuit filed by the Southern Center for Human Rights in October 2016 against the city of Columbus, a local judge and several law enforcement officers.

'You Are My Slave:' Kennesaw School's Civil War Day Sparks Mom's Ire

Oct 13, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

A new battle line has formed in the national debate over Civil War flags and symbols — this time at a Georgia school not far from a mountaintop where Confederate soldiers fired their cannons at Union troops more than a century ago.

The school near Kennesaw Mountain last month invited fifth-graders to dress up as characters from the Civil War.

A white student, dressed as a plantation owner, said to a 10-year-old black classmate, "You are my slave," said the black child's parent, Corrie Davis.

We've heard from over 200 musicians, scientists, and other creative-types in the more than three years that "Two Way Street" has been on the air. Today, we're checking in on what three of our most interesting guests are up to now: record-setting swimmer Diana Nyad, singer-songwriter Radney Foster, and Tony-winning director Kenny Leon

Parents of disabled students and a group of advocates say in a federal lawsuit that Georgia schools have put thousands of children into a separate program and failed to give them an adequate education.

The Georgia Advocacy Office and other groups said in a statement that they filed the lawsuit this week in the northern district of Georgia's federal courts.

The complaint alleges that the students have been segregated into a program known as the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support, or GNETS.

On this edition of Political Rewind, will Georgia legislators proceed with plans to expand gun rights in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre?  We’re getting our first clues now.  Plus, new signals that state GOP leaders may be dropping their longtime resistance to investing in public transit.

The winners of this year’s Nobel Prizes were announced last week. Last month, slightly less prestigious awards honored the funny side of scientific discovery. The Ig Nobel Prizes have been awarded annually since 1991 to honor achievements that “first make people laugh, and then make them think.” We talk about silly science with Marc Abraham, an organizer and founder of the Ig Nobel Prizes. Also with us is Georgia Tech doctoral student Patricia Yang, who won an Ig Nobel Prize in 2015.

Two major puppy mill were busted in Georgia this year. One in April rescued more than 350 animals. Last month in Fulton County, authorities found 60 dogs, 53 lizards, a rabbit and a piranha at another site. We talk with Jessica Rock, Founding Partner at Animal Law Source.

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