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(AP PHOTO/TODD KIRKLAND, FILE)

The National Rifle Association endorsed Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle, days before the July 24 GOP runoff against Secretary of State Brian Kemp.  This comes as Kemp tried to paint Cagle as weak on gun issues.

 

STUART ISETT / FORTUNE

July fifth 2018 marks the fourth anniversary of  "Two Way Street." To celebrate that milestone, we're revisiting one of our favorite conversations: an interview with Diana Nyad, the strong-willed swimmer who was the first to swim from Cuba to Florida without a protective shark cage. 

She completed the feat, which many thought was impossible, at the remarkable age of 66. 


(AP Photo/David Goldman)

What is there was a primary runoff election and no one voted?  Early voting for the July 24th election starts today, but candidates vying for a spot in the general election worry voters won’t show up to cast ballots. 

(AP Photos, John Amis and Todd Kirkland, File)

Early voting in the Republican runoff for governor starts Monday and a new poll shows Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp neck and neck among GOP voters.   


GPB News

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” Tom Johnson shares stories about his life and career in journalism.

We’re revisiting this conversation — and other favorites — as part of our “Two Way Street” anniversary celebration. To kick off our fifth year, we’re listening again to the shows that we can’t let go: the conversations that challenged us, surprised us and have stuck with us all these years. This show originally aired on January 14, 2017.


(AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser, File)

From GPB News, this is Political Rewind.  Today, a long-awaited decision from the United States Supreme Court in Florida’s fight with Georgia over water rights from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.  We’ll discuss what happens next in the fight. 


(AP Photo/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we’re one month away from the runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp to decide the Republican nominee for governor.  What is Casey Cagle saying on the campaign trail to connect himself to the most popular Republican in the state?


(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Donald Trump may have signed an order keeping immigrant families arrested at the border together, but it’s his comments this morning about pending immigration legislation that some say just threw GOP members of Congress under the bus. 


(AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal announces a first step to build new transit in metro Atlanta, a huge project along Georgia 400.  Is the state on track to tackle the region’s traffic headaches?


Immigration Showdown In Washington

Jun 18, 2018
(U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector via AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, immigration takes center stage in Washington this week.  Outrage over the Department of Justice policy of separating children from parents at the border is growing and it’s spreading across partisan lines. 


Today: Georgia's U.S. Senators go their separate ways over President Trump's tariffs. Johnny Isakson wants Congress to approve them while David Perdue says the President has the power to act on his own. We'll look at that split, and at Perdue's apparent unwavering loyalty to the Trump agenda. 


Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, GA

Savannah businessman Charles Lamar on Nov. 28, 1858, became the first person in 40 years to land a slave ship on American soil.

That event is the subject of Jim Jordan’s new book, “The Slave-Trader’s Letter-Book: Charles Lamer, the Wanderer, and other Tales of the African Slave Trade.”

Jordan was able to reconstruct the story because he got his hands on valuable research material — Charles Lamar’s own letters, which most historians didn’t even believe existed.   


Wikimedia Commons

An ambitious historic preservation project in Augusta achieves a major milestone Wednesday.  Trinity CME Church is being moved to a new location.

 

“Mother Trinity”, as it is affectionately known, is considered the birthplace of the Christian Methodist Episcopal denomination. The stately brick structure, with its twin spires and multiple stain glass windows, has occupied the corner of 8th and Taylor Streets for more than 125 years.

Environmental contamination from a 19th century manufactured gas plant made it necessary for the congregation to sell the building in 1997.  It's been empty ever since. There was talk over the years of demolishing it, but the leadership of the Augusta Canal National Heritage area, which owns land adjacent to the church, thought it was worth saving. Engineers, contractors and donors, came with up a plan to move the church to a new location a few hundred yards away.

Work began early this year excavating under the church and installing a lattice of massive steel beams. Then came the task of getting it on wheels. Dayton Sherrouse, executive director of the Augusta Canal National Heritage Area, said 12 dollies and 96 tires will roll the church to its new home.

AP Photo/John Amis

GOP gubernatorial candidate under fire for a secret recording, in which he admits he used legislation to undermine a primary opponent. And why did former rival Clay Tippins record and leak the tape? Our panel has answers.


ASSOCIATED PRESS

Who is Atticus Finch really—an arch-segregationist or a champion of justice? And how do we go about answering that question when going straight to the source isn’t an option?


(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Casey Cagle goes to Vegas to raise campaign cash and Brian Kemp warns voters he may be there with casinos in Georgia on his mind.  Will gambling become a major issue in the governor’s race?  Then, what’s behind Karen Handel’s rejection of President Trump’s newly imposed tariffs?  Plus, does morality in politics matter anymore?  We’ll look at Bill Clinton’s recent “tone deaf” comments on Monica Lewinsky and the #MeToo movement, Ralph Reed’s defense of President Trump’s behavior and a poll that shows more Americans than ever are just fine with pornography.


(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Supreme Court issues a landmark ruling, siding with a baker who refused to make a gay couple’s wedding cake. It’s a narrowly argued decision, but it will have an impact here in Georgia and across the country.  Then, Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Casey Cagle have been polling voters to come up with strategies for how to win the governor’s mansion.  Meanwhile, Brian Kemp is promoting his own polls that show him neck-and-neck with Cagle for the GOP nomination.  Our panel looks at the latest news from the governor’s race.  Plus, could a federal court force Georgia election officials to scramble to provide paper ballots for the November elections?


(AP Photo/Hans-Maximo Musielik, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the always contentious issues of illegal immigration is back in the spotlight.  A bi-partisan group of U.S. House members is pushing hard to bring a number of reform bills to the floor for a vote, but Speaker Paul Ryan isn’t ready to play ball.  Also, the White House is under fire for promoting a policy of separating children from parents when families are apprehended by border police.


Roseanne And Racism

May 30, 2018
(Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, ABC’s firing of Roseanne Barr over her Twitter bullying of Valerie Jarrett is the hottest topic in the country today. Why can’t we erase the stain of racism that continues to plague us? Do Southerners have a unique perspective on the problem? Our panel weighs in on what may be the thorniest issue in American life. Also, Republicans have begun their effort to paint Stacey Abrams in a negative light, pushing her to release her tax returns and explain her financial problems. Meanwhile, Casey Cagle begins his TV campaign to win the GOP runoff with a sunny message from his wife. How will Brian Kemp respond?


(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, after choosing their nominee for governor, Georgia Democrats declare they are unified and energized to put Stacey Abrams in the Governor’s Mansion this fall. Meanwhile, Republicans here and in Washington are wasting no time attacking Abrams even as they face a potentially contentious gubernatorial runoff battle between Brian Kemp and Casey Cagle. Our panel weighs in on the latest news in the midterm elections. Plus, what was behind Democratic Congressman David Scott’s emotional speech in the U.S. House last week. The AJC’s Jim Galloway tells us why Scott thinks racism is behind a funding measure dropped from the Farm Bill.


(AP Photos/John Bazemore, Todd Kirkland, John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the race for governor of Georgia moves one step down the road.  Democratic voters advance Stacey Abrams to the general election in overwhelming fashion, while Republicans set the stage for a fight for the soul of their party, a runoff between Casey Cagle and Brian Kemp.  Runoffs will also determine which candidates will face GOP congressional incumbents some see as vulnerable in the fall.  Our panel of insiders break down the vote and look at what to expect as they 2018 election marches towards November.

Panelists:

Grant Blankenship/GPB

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, it’s Election Day in Georgia as voters go to the polls to make their choices in dozens of races.  Democrats will pick their nominee for governor and no matter who wins, it will be the first time ever in Georgia that a woman will lead a party’s ticket into the Fall.  Republicans may send their governor’s race to a mid-summer runoff, which means they’ll endure nine more weeks of campaigning before they can turn their attention to the winning in November.  Also, two potentially vulnerable GOP incumbent members of Congress will be eyeing the results

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, voters across Georgia go to the polls tomorrow to elect candidates in dozens of primary races.  Which Stacey will emerge as the Democratic candidate for governor?

Still from YouTube / GPB

Comedian Paula Poundstone is concerned she will have to whisper her act at the Miller Theater in Augusta Friday.

"Because of the golf," she told us in a hushed voice. 

Such a quiet routine would be a departure from Poundstone's typically boisterous commentary on NPR's weekly news quiz "Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!" She's been a panelist on the show more than 200 times, but told us she holds the "Wait Wait" record for losses. 

On this edition of "Two Way Street," we sit down with four smart, well read Georgians to discuss their favorite books. This conversation picks up the discussion started by "The Great American Read," an eight-part PBS series that unpacks a diverse list of 100 books. "The Great American Read" premieres Tuesday May 22 at 8 PM on GPB. 

APC/GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Democratic candidates for governor trade sharp blows and share kind words in their only statewide televised debate.  Can we expect the same when GOP candidates meet for their debate?  Evidence suggests that’s unlikely.  Plus, we now have figures showing us just how much the race for governor has cost—almost $13 million spent by candidates on both sides, so far.  Also, will the Supreme Court’s decision on sports gambling energize the forces pushing for casinos in Georgia, and what about horserace gambling?  We’ll look at the odds.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, with Georgia primary elections just one week away, the battle of the Staceys for the Democratic nomination for governor gets uglier.  GOP candidates push hard to win a runoff spot with frontrunner Casey Cagle.  Plus, Democrats in two congressional districts fight for the right to take on two potentially vulnerable GOP incumbents. 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

Former Congressman Buddy Darden

Republican Strategist Heath Garrett

(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp doubles down on his muscular advocacy for gun rights and it just may be propelling him forward in the GOP governor’s race.  The AJC’s Jim Galloway tells us why he thinks the Parkland massacre has not deterred, but empowered gun supporters.  We’ll also discuss the risky path Democrat Stacey Abrams charts as she works to win her party’s nomination.  Plus, Sonny Perdue’s biggest battle yet as Agriculture Secretary and why Atlanta could soon be on the national political stage once again. 

Panelists:

(AP Photo/Todd Kirkland)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal wraps up the official bill signing period with a flourish: his signature on one bill means Georgians could now pay state sales tax for many online purchases.  He also approved a controversial bill that could set a precedent for allowing Georgia cities to be split in two by residents looking for a change and a he vetoes a bill that was a showcase measure for GOP gubernatorial candidate Casey Cagle.  Plus, the Secretary of State’s Office launches an investigation into potential voting irregularities in last December’s race for Atlanta mayor. 

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the 2018 primary elections are just two weeks away and we now have information on early voting that may offer clues as to what to expect on May 22.  Then, Kennesaw State University is making headlines again, this time over questions about their policy on accepting Georgians who are undocumented residents.  Plus, a high powered, well-connected Republican Atlanta attorney whose nomination to become an ambassador is on hold.  Is his embrace of a controversial Georgia election law holding him back?

Panelists:

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