atlanta mayoral race

Recount Doesn't Significantly Alter Atlanta Mayoral Race

Dec 14, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

A recount in the Atlanta mayoral election runoff hasn't altered results significantly.

Election officials in two counties that include parts of Atlanta on Thursday recounted the ballots cast on Dec. 5.

The result: Keisha Lance Bottoms still narrowly leads Mary Norwood, who asked for the recount after Bottoms was declared the winner by a margin of less than 1 percent.

Official Atlanta Mayoral Runoff Results Retain Thin Margin

Dec 12, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

The vote tallies for the runoff election in the Atlanta mayoral race are official, but with a razor-thin margin remaining, the trailing candidate said Monday that she plans to ask for a recount.

Election officials in Fulton and DeKalb counties, which both include parts of Atlanta, certified their votes, which still have Keisha Lance Bottoms winning the race.

Bottoms' lead grew from 759 votes in unofficial tallies released last week to 832 votes in the certified results. That still amounts to less than 1 percent of the votes.

Atlanta Will Soon Know Official Vote Tally In Mayoral Runoff

Dec 11, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

Atlanta is a step closer to having an official record of how close its mayoral election runoff was.

Fulton County election officials on Monday morning certified the county's vote totals from the Dec. 5 runoff. Election officials in DeKalb County, which also includes part of Atlanta, planned to certify their results later Monday.

The official Fulton County results show Keisha Lance Bottoms with 42,887 votes, or 51.33 percent, and Mary Norwood with 40,668, or 48.67 percent.

@KeishaBottoms

Election officials in DeKalb and Fulton counties have scheduled meetings on Monday to certify their vote tallies from last week’s runoff election.

In the mayor’s race, Keisha Lance Bottom’s bested Mary Norwood by 759 votes.

After the results are certified, Norwood says she will formally request a recount.

A Little Déjà Vu As Atlanta Mayoral Runoff Splits Voters

Dec 7, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

Atlanta voters woke up to déjà vu Wednesday in the racially polarized contest to choose the city's next mayor, with one candidate laying claim to City Hall while the other vowed to seek a recount over a margin of just 759 votes.

The Tuesday runoff between Keisha Lance Bottoms, who is black, and Mary Norwood, who is white, split Atlanta practically in half after a vitriolic campaign punctuated by political grudges and allegations of corruption. Unofficial results showed Bottoms leading with 46,464 votes, or 50.41 percent, to Norwood's 45,705 votes, or 49.59 percent.

  •  Mayoral results in Atlanta could be finalized next week
  •  The Falcons prepare for a Thursday Night Football matchup against the Saints
  •  KSU President Sam Olens faces mounting pressure to step down

John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Keisha Lance Bottoms declares victory in a mayor’s race decided by fewer than 800 votes, but Mary Norwood wants a recount. Could the results be overturned? We’ll also look at whether the results of special legislative elections suggest a shifting balance of power under the Gold Dome. Plus, our panel weighs in on President Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, a move that may throw any chance for peace in the Middle East into chaos.

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET

Atlanta has voted for a new mayor, but Tuesday's election still leaves questions about who she will be.

In an exceedingly close race, Keisha Lance Bottoms came out just 759 votes ahead of her opponent, Mary Norwood. Bottoms claimed victory early Wednesday morning, but Norwood isn't conceding. The race looks headed for a recount.

  • Election Day In Georgia
  • APS Modifies Dress Code
  • Atlanta Annexes Emory
  • PSC Analysts Recommend Killing Plant Vogtle Project

  • Voters go to the polls to elect Atlanta's next mayor
  • Atlanta's Board of Education amends dress code policy after a petition
  • New study finds that the state hasn't done enough to combat the opioid crisis

Atlanta Mayor's Race Too Close To Call

Dec 5, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

Keisha Lance Bottoms declared herself the next mayor of Atlanta early Wednesday morning while her opponent, Mary Norwood, called for a recount.

David Goldman / AP Photo

Atlanta has a new voter bloc that could sway the 2017 mayoral runoff election.

Keisha Lance Bottoms garnered 26 percent of votes on November 7, largely from the city's southern, African-American voters. Mary Norwood's 21 percent came mostly from the city's northern, white voters.

Kennesaw State University political scientist Kerwin Swint sat down with Rickey Bevington to explain why a significant group of East Atlanta voters are voting on economic policy rather than race or politics.

  • The Latest on The Atlanta Mayor's Race
  • The "DAWGS" Vie For The National Championship 
  • State Sen Rick Jeffares Resigns

Ken Lund / Creative Commons

On this edition of Political Rewind, does Democratic Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams have aspirations to run for president? Plus, if religious liberty is a key to winning the GOP gubernatorial primary, why is Brian Kemp backing away from a proposal that would allow adoptions to be denied on the basis of the sexual orientation of prospective parents? And, Atlanta mayoral candidates Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood square off in the GPB debate on the eve of new polling that shows the race is a dead heat.

Today's headlines include:

  • Atlanta's mayoral candidates discuss race and affordability in a GPB debate.
  • Betsy DeVos visits GSU to discuss college costs with students
  • Thousands of banks team up to sue Atlanta based Equifax

David Goldman / AP Photo

The next Mayor of Atlanta will have a lot of problems to solve when she takes office in January.

Mary Norwood and Keisha Lance Bottoms are in a December 5 runoff to replace Kasim Reed, who is term limited.

Atlanta Magazine articles editor Thomas Wheatley joined Rickey Bevington to discuss the major issues facing Atlanta and how the candidates are poised to handle them.

On a special edition of "Political Rewind," the two finalists for mayor of Atlanta debate on Georgia Public Broadcasting. We ask the candidates, Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood, about a variety of issues important to the future of the city as Election Day approaches.

In today's headlines:

  • Shirley Franklin endorses Mary Norwood in the Atlanta mayoral race
  • The candidates face off in two debates, including a 2 p.m. discussion on GPB's "Political Rewind"
  • #GivingTuesday raises hundreds of thousands of dollars for charity

Change is coming to Atlanta’s city hall. 

Where do Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood stand on race, transportation, Confederate monuments, corruption and Atlanta’s impact on the entire state? 

Recorded live on Tuesday, Nov. 28, GPB’s Bill Nigut, along with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s Jim Galloway and former WSB-TV anchor Monica Pearson moderated a special edition of Political Rewind: The Atlanta Mayoral Debate.

In today's headlines:

  • Mary Norwood and Keisha Lance Bottoms square off in their first debate
  • A bump stock ban in Georgia could be on the horizon
  • Preparations for Monday's implosion of the Georgia Dome are moving forward

Could Atlanta Be On Track To Elect A White Mayor?

Nov 9, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo

On Nov. 7, none of the 12 candidates for mayor of Atlanta received more than 50 percent of the vote.

That means the two candidates with the most votes, Councilwomen Keisha Lance Bottoms and Mary Norwood, will face off in a Dec. 5 runoff. Lance Bottoms is black. Norwood is white.

Could 2017 be the year that Atlanta elects its first white mayor in more than a generation?

Mayor Keisha? Ethnic Names No Obstacle For Black Candidates

Nov 9, 2017
David Goldman / AP Photo/File

Atlanta's next mayor could be a black woman named Keisha — a prospect that thrills Diamond Harris.

The 28-year-old graphic designer exulted Wednesday on her Facebook page: "Keisha, Keisha, Keisha! I just want a mayor name Keisha."

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

TaxCredits.net / Flickr

Tuesday, November 7, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall. 

Next Tuesday, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall.  A joint investigation by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Georgia News Lab examines the flow of money from city contractors to the campaigns. We talk with AJC reporter Dan Klepal and Georgia News Lab reporter Ryan Basden.

Connor Carey / Wikimedia Commons

On this edition of Political Rewind, the panel looks at the issues that emerged in the debates among GOP candidates for governor of Georgia, which took place in Milledgeville and Augusta over the weekend of October 7 and 8. All of them endorsed a religious liberty bill, and turned thumbs down to legalizing casino gambling. How will those positions play with voters?

Saporta Report

 

For more than forty years, the city of Atlanta has been led by an African-American mayor.

 

Maynard Jackson started the trend in 1974, becoming the first black mayor elected in a major southern city.

The man who preceded Jackson was Sam Massell, who made history of his own in 1970 when he became the first Jewish mayor of Atlanta.

Georgia House of Representatives

Today on “Political Rewind,” what might happen to Georgia legislators who work to remove Confederate memorials in locations in South Georgia? In an ominous message, Woodbine Rep. Jason Spencer, a white lawmaker, told African-American Rep. LaDawn Jones that “she won’t be met with torches but something a lot more definitive” if she continues to call for the removal of Confederate statues in South Georgia. This, just a day after elected officials and citizens came together to celebrate the display of unity that accompanied the unveiling of the statue of MLK at the Capitol.