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Ross Terrell / GPB News

SunTrust Park opened in the Spring of 2017. It doesn’t yet have two full seasons of Atlanta Braves baseball, but the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday released a fiscal impact study of the stadium and surrounding areas.


A voter enters a polling site in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017.
(AP PHOTO/DAVID GOLDMAN)

Monday night, a federal judge denied a request to move Georgia’s 159 counties to paper ballots ahead of the Nov. 6 midterm election.

But she also denied the state’s request to dismiss the lawsuit, writing that Georgia’s 16-year-old touchscreen voting system is at risk of cyberattack or other threats.

GPB's Stephen Fowler has been following the case. He spoke with GPB's Rickey Bevington about what comes next.


GPB

Today, "On Second Thought" took a scan of the state.

We spoke with NPR political reporter Asma Khalid about low voter turnout, and heard from some of the Georgians she met in Houston, Cobb and Hancock counties.

GPB's own Emily Jones also joined from Savannah with a story about alligators in the Okefenokee swamp, and "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott munched on some edible bugs with University of Georgia entomologist Marianne Shockley.

We also caught up with John T. Edge of the Southern Foodways Alliance. His new series, "TrueSouth," debuts on SEC Network tonight. Chef Todd Richards also told us about his favorite Southern ingredient: collard greens. 

A new voting machine which prints a paper record sits on display at a polling site in Conyers, Ga.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Federal Judge Amy Totenberg denied a group’s request to require the state to switch to paper ballots. Georgia’s 27,000 electronic voting machines will remain in use for November’s election. But she said that Georgia's election officials have "buried their heads in the sand" on the issue of voting vulnerabilities.


Sean Powers / GPB

We launched a new "On Second Thought" series on Tuesday called “Main Ingredient” in which a chef tells us about his or her essential Southern ingredient. Host Virginia Prescott heads into the kitchen with Atlanta-based chef and cookbook author, Todd Richards. He shares with us his love for collard greens.

"Bacon, Collard and Fried Egg Sandwich" by Todd Richards

SEC Network / Bluefoot Entertainment

Football and food are two mighty markers of Southern identity. The two intersect tonight when John T. Edge and Wright Thompson's new series "TrueSouth," an exploration of Southern food and culture, debuts on SEC Network. In the first episode, Edge, who directs the Southern Foodways Alliance, goes to Birmingham, Alabama, where he meets generations of Greek-Americans who transformed their community. 


Paul Sableman / Flickr

With American politics more polarized than ever, most Americans have at least one thing in common going into midterms: they tend to stay home on Election Day. In fact, as NPR political reporter Asma Khalid has found, midterm elections have not drawn a majority of voters to the polls since the early 1900s. She set out to find out why.


atlantaga.gov

  • Judge Rules Against Paper Ballots For November Election
  • Vote On Gulch Redevelopment Tax Incentives Delayed
  • Coca Cola: "No Interest In Marijuana Or Cannabis"

AP

As Georgia's November midterm elections steadily approach, GPB's Morning Edition is taking a look at the importance of the offices on the ballot and why Georgians should turn out to vote in these races.

Powered By The People is a weekly series where GPB-Atlanta host Leah Fleming speaks with political voices from around the state to give listeners a better idea about the offices that could impact their futures.

This week, we examine the role of the Lieutenant Governor in Georgia, a seperate election from the nationally scrutinized Governor's race. 

WHENISCALENDARS.COM/GOOGLE IMAGES

Georgia will not have to move from its direct-recording electronic voting machines for this November’s elections.

In a Monday night ruling, U.S. District Court Judge Amy Totenberg denied a preliminary injunction that would have required more than 2,600 voting precincts in 159 counties to switch to an optically-scanned paper ballot system for the Nov. 6 election.

Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Senate Judiciary Committee might have to delay their vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh after sexual assault allegations have surfaced.


atlantaga.gov

  • Paper Ballot Decision Pending
  • Georgia Red Cross Volunteers Deploy For Florence Recovery
  • Parks & Trails Network Proposed Along Chattahoochee River

Keizers / Wiki Commons

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms announced Monday in a press release that she would not ask for a vote on Gulch redevelopments from Atlanta’s City Council.


atlantaga.gov

  • Georgia Dodges High Winds, Heavy Rain of Tropical Storm Florence
  • Georgia Department of Corrections Admits Underpaying Overtime
  • Food Production Hub Coming To Middle Georgia  


atlantaga.gov

  • Hurricane Florence Poses Minimal Risk To Georgia
  • Atlanta City Council Discusses The Future Of The Gulch
  • College Football Teams Adjust Weekend Schedules

atlantaga.gov

  • East Georgia Communities Brace For Hurricane Florence Rain
  • Charter School Explains New Corporal Punishment Policy
  • Federal Judge Mulls Case For Paper Ballots  


Joel Mclendon / Flickr/CC

A federal judge could decide as soon as tomorrow whether Georgia must switch from digital touchscreen voting machines to a paper ballot system.

A group of election integrity advocates and concerned Georgia voters say the change needs to be made before November’s election.

GPB’s Stephen Fowler was in yesterday’s hearing. He spoke to GPB's Rickey Bevington about the case.


atlantaga.gov

  • Hurricane Florence Will Impact Georgia
  • Attorneys: State Can't Take Over Hartsfield Jackson Airport Until 2036
  • GBI Sends Atlanta City Hall Open Records Probe Results To Attorney General

Grant Blankenship/GPB

A federal judge could decide this week if the state must switch to paper ballots for this November’s election.

Judge Amy Totenberg told a packed courtroom Wednesday the request to change the state’s election infrastructure was a “catch-22.” One the one hand, Totenberg said protecting voting rights from threats of cyberattack or hacking was important because it deals with the integrity and credibility of the voting system.

Voter casting his ballot in Sandy Springs, Ga.
John Bazemore, File / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s voting infrastructure and security is the focus of a lawsuit being argued in federal court. With the election less than two months away, election officials say a last-minute change to paper ballots would cause chaos, while voter security advocates hope United States District Court Judge Amy Totenberg will require the state to replace the touchscreen machines with paper ballots.  


atlantaga.gov

  • Gov. Deal Declares State Of Emergency Ahead Of Hurricane Florence
  • Abrams, Kent Schedule Two Debates
  • Hearing On Switch To Paper Ballots Underway

National Weather Service

The National Weather Service says Georgia will be spared the worst of Florence, which was downgraded to a tropical depression Sunday morning. 

  • Hurricane Florence Brings Dangerous Rip Currents To Georgia Coast
  • Black Health Conference Takes Place In Atlanta
  • Braves, Cobb County Reach Settlement After Financial Disagreement


atlantaga.gov


Ross Terrell / GPB News

Hundreds of African-Americans met in downtown Atlanta Tuesday for the first State of Black Health conference.


Political Rewind: The Divide Over Medicaid

Sep 11, 2018

On this edition of Political Rewind, Stacey Abrams unveils a proposal she says will provide health care to the neediest Georgians.  The Kemp campaign says Abrams’ plan to expand Medicaid is a non-starter, but they have yet to announce how they’ll address a problem voters say is high on their list of priorities.


atlantaga.gov

  • New GM At Hartsfield Jackson Airport
  • Affordable Housing Complex Opens In Atlanta
  • Hurricane Florence

As Georgia's November midterm elections steadily approach, GPB's Morning Edition is taking a look at the importance of the offices on the ballot and why Georgians should turn out to vote in these races.

Powered By The People is a weekly series where GPB-Atlanta host Leah Fleming speaks with political voices from around the state to give listeners a better idea about the offices that could impact their futures.


Ross Terrell / GPB News

The city of Atlanta unveiled a new affordable housing complex for seniors on Monday.


From left: incumbent U.S. Rep. Karen Handel, candidate for lieutenant governor, Sarah Riggs Amico, candidate for governor Stacey Abrams.
(AP Photo/John Bazemore, GPB News/Stephen Fowler)

On this edition of Political Rewind, there are an unprecedented number of women running for office this year, and a majority of Americans are happy to see the increase.


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