Athens

EatingInsectsAthens.com

A bug in your food is not usually considered a good thing, but what if it was there on purpose?

The United Nations reports around two billion people include insects in their daily diet. Companies like Chirp Chips and Chapul are making bugs a snacking option in the United States. In Georgia, mealworms and crickets top the list of commonly consumed insects.

We spoke with entomologist Marianne Shockley who researches edible insects at the University of Georgia.


EatingInsectsAthens.com

There’s a conference happening in Athens, and its name tells you all you need to know: Eating Insects.  Members of the North American Coalition for Insects in Agriculture, scientists, chefs and others will discuss everything from the latest recipes to the ethics of eating bugs. 


Athens-Clarke County Police Department

A cell phone video making the rounds on social media has prompted an internal affairs investigation by The Athens-Clarke County Police Department.

The video shows a 10-year-old boy being held face down on the ground by a pair of officers following the arrest of his father after a domestic disturbance. Bodycam footage released by police shows what came first: an emotional outburst following the arrest in which the boy leapt at one officer.


HDS Community Garden / Flickr

In one way or another, access to green space — or lack thereof — affects all 10 million Georgians. Around the state, communities are looking for ways to help everyone get outside and lead healthier lives. In Macon, there’s Georgia’s first urban agrihood. In Savannah, there’s a campaign underway to make bicycles more accessible and safe roadways more available. And in Athens, a network of community gardens and farmers markets helps educate and empower everyone from school children to seniors.

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

You probably saw the photo. 

A woman with her right hand raised in a fist, her left on the autobiography of Malcolm X. That was Mariah Parker. 


GPB Morning Headlines For Monday, June 4, 2018

Jun 4, 2018

  • Athens Officer Fired After Striking Fleeing Man With Patrol Car
  • APD Chief Erika Shields Says All Dashcam Footage Lost After March Cyberattack
  • Atlanta Braves See Sharp Rise In Ratings During First Place Season


Matthew Sweet Returns To Georgia

May 23, 2018
Courtesy Matthew Sweet

Singer and songwriter Matthew Sweet got his start in the Athens, Georgia, music scene in the 1980s. His star rose in the 90s with hits like 100% Fun, Altered Beast and Blue Sky on Mars. Sweet’s drive to creative music hasn’t slowed down.

A month ago, 17 people died in a mass school shooting in Florida. To remember the victims, students nationwide are walking out of their classrooms Wednesday morning in solidarity. We talked with student Lauren Bengtson of Pope High School in Cobb County. Her father, Mike, also joined the conversation.  Then, we talked with Frank LoMonte of the Student Press Law Center about whether schools can take action against students who participate in Wednesday’s walkout. 

All hour, we looked back at some of the best conversations by Celeste Headlee, who recently stepped down as host of ‘On Second Thought."

We started off the show with our chat with Henry Winkler, best known as “The Fonz” on TV’s Happy Days. Winkler came to Georgia last summer for the Decatur Book Festival. He’s the co-creator of a popular children’s book series that centers on Hank Zipzer, a young boy with learning difficulties.

Of Montreal / Polyvinyl Record Co.

Not too many indie bands can say they’ve gone strong for more than 20 years. Athens group Of Montreal is an exception. Founded by Kevin Barnes in the late 90s, the band has released 14 full length albums. Their 15th album, called "White Is Relic / Irrealis Mood," comes out on March 9th. We talk with Barnes about the vision behind this latest record.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Last month, the DeKalb County Commission voted to relocate the Confederate monument in Decatur Square. But state law is tricky, and the county’s options are limited. What is the process for getting a monument successfully taken down? What legal barriers will make the effort difficult? We ask these questions with Elena Parent, state Senator for Decatur.

Audio Postcard: Athens' Confederate Monument

Feb 6, 2018
Trevor Young / GPB

We’ve spent a lot of time talking about Georgia’s Confederate memorials. Now we visit one. In Athens, you almost certainly run into the obelisk downtown memorializing confederate soldiers. It sits right on Broad Street, just feet away from UGA’s famous arches. Producer Trevor Young asks Athenians how they feel about the monument in an audio postcard.

red & black

This month on Nothing Funny About Money, Matt & Michael discuss various options for limiting student debt by paying for college while you are actually IN COLLEGE!

Neighbor Lady

We add two more tunes to our ever-growing Georgia Playlist. Merideth Hanscom plays with the Athens-based group Neighbor Lady. They perform at 529 Bar in Atlanta tonight [Jan. 31]. Hanscom brings us tracks by Deerhunter and Omni.

For years, Atlanta has worked to fix failing public schools. Charter schools have begun to appear as an alternative to many of those troubled schools. In author David Osborne’s latest book, Reinventing America’s Schools, he suggests charter school-like guidelines that all schools should follow, including Atlanta’s. We talked with him and Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Maureen Downey.

 

 

Last week, a federal judge temporarily halted the Trump administration's plan to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. It’s unclear if legislative efforts to extend the program will be successful. 

How Ticks Are Making Us Allergic To Meat

Jan 9, 2018
Misenus1 / Foter

Little is known about the Alpha-Gal allergy. The condition causes people to break out or experience more severe conditions after eating meat. The allergy has spread via the Lone Star tick, a deadly culprit making its way across the Southeast. 

 

Atlanta’s the college football center of the world on Monday night, as the University of Georgia Dawgs try to stem the University of Alabama’s Tide, in the National Championship game. A win for Georgia would be the first national championship victory for the team in more than 35 years. We get a preview from GPB’s senior sports correspondent Jon Nelson and University of Georgia sports journalism professor Vicki Michaelis.

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on the short-form improvisational comedy show "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. We talked with him about his craft.

On this episode of Nothing Funny About Money, Matt And Michael discuss the financial implications of the meaning of Christmas. Guests include Stephanie Cockfield of Ark Athens and some guy in a white beard!

Georgia educators are filing a class-action lawsuit against the state over retirement benefits. The state Department of Community Health changed a law in 2012, effectively reducing the subsidies of any retirees who were in the school system for less than five years. We talk about the controversy with James Salzer, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

#MeToo is not only a movement about sexual harassment. It’s a reckoning for the way we work, and a call to change the power dynamics leading to sexual abuse. We talk with people who dedicate, in different ways, their professional lives to understanding toxic work environments and how to dismantle them. Erica Clemmons is the Georgia State Director for 9 to 5; Marie Mitchell is a professor of management at the University of Georgia’s business school; and Joey Price is the CEO of Jumpstart HR, a human resources consulting firm based in Baltimore.

A record number of guns were confiscated this year at Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. Though that follows a national trend, the Atlanta airport led the nation in the number of guns found for another year. We discuss this with Kelly Yamanouchi, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution who focuses on airport-related stories. Tom Barton, a Georgia Criminal Defense Lawyer, also joins us. 

Last month, Moody’s Investors Service issued a stern warning to states: address climate change or risk a credit downgrade. That report says Georgia is one of a handful of coastal states facing the highest risk from climate change. We talk with climate change reporter Christopher Flavelle of Bloomberg News and Jennette Gayer of Environment Georgia.

The Trump Administration’s immigration crackdown has led to an uptick in arrests nationwide. New federal data show arrests in Georgia and the Carolinas are also up from the last fiscal year. The president’s push to be tough on illegal immigration also includes policies to build a massive wall at the U.S.-Mexico border. Historian Kenneth C. Davis explains that anti-immigrant sentiment is older than America itself.

Georgia’s Secretary of State is in charge of its voting system. And it’s an elected office. So the person who oversees fair elections, also runs as a candidate. Is this an inherent conflict of interest? Secretary of State Brian Kemp has been accused by some of using his position to help Republicans win elections. Now, Kemp is running in the Republican primary for governor. We talk with Robert Howard, Executive Director of the Southern Political Science Association.

A New Era Of Jazz Under Kamasi Washington

Dec 6, 2017
Kamasi Washington

Kamasi Washington is one of most active and innovative jazz musicians alive today. The saxophonist/composer has performed with and recorded for a diverse group of artists--including Lauryn Hill, Herbie Hancock, Flying Lotus, and Kendrick Lamar.

AllMusic

"Happy birthday!" to one of Georgia’s most iconic musicians. Little Richard was born in Macon on December 5, 1932. He grew up singing gospel in the Pentecostal church. His big break came in September of 1955, when he recorded “Tutti Fruitti.” His style influenced countless musicians, including Kate Pierson of the B-52s. She recently nominated “Tutti Fruitti” for our Georgia Playlist. We’ll hear why it tops her list of essential Georgia listening.

New FBI data show an uptick in reported hate crimes. Nationwide, 2016 saw more than 6,100 incidents, up by more than 270 from  the year before. Georgia reported a drop in hate crimes during that period. But a recent ProPublica investigation finds many police departments, including those in Georgia, aren’t trained to identify and investigate hate crimes. This could lead to underreporting. We talk with ProPublica’s A.C. Thompson.

Churches in the United States are barred from endorsing political candidates, or contributing to campaigns. This part of our tax code is known as the Johnson Amendment. It includes all non-profit organizations. But Republicans, including President Trump, want to repeal the amendment as part of a federal tax overhaul happening now. We talk about politics from the pulpit with researcher Matthew Boedy, an assistant professor at the University of North Georgia. And we discuss how taxes change behavior with Susan Anderson,  an accounting professor at Elon University in North Carolina.

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