2018 election

Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photos/John Amis, File)

A new poll released Monday by Landmark Communications shows no clear leader in the race for governor in Georgia. Republican Brian Kemp currently leads Democrat Stacey Abrams by a margin of 48 to 46 percent.

The statewide poll asked 964 likely voters who they would vote for if the election were today. Although Kemp leads by 1.7 percentage points, the poll has a 3.2 percent margin of error, meaning the race is a virtual tie.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, education becomes a forefront issue on the campaign trail in Georgia. What will each candidate offer and how will their proposals improve rural education without causing large tax increases? 


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

County elections officials across the state are getting ready for the Nov. 6 election.

That includes testing Georgia’s 27,000 touch-screen voting machines.

On a humid Monday morning, Fayette County elections director Floyd Jones and his team begin the logic and accuracy testing process for the direct-recording electronic voting machines – nearly 300 of them.

Wikimedia Commons

Is Georgia turning blue? That question came up in 2014 when Jason Carter ran for governor, in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president and in 2017 with Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the most expensive House race in history. Every time, however, Georgia remained a red state where Republicans won.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Stephanie McClure, a professor of sociology at Georgia College and State University in Milledgeville, had a simple plan.

She and other members of the Middle Georgia Progressive Women activist group would head out to a Baldwin County High School football game with a stack of voter registration forms and sign people up. But when a friend went to the office of the Baldwin County Registrar to pick up the forms, they hit a road block. The forms asked for proof of residency, such as a photo ID, to register.

  

Live Updates: Election Day July 24, 2018

Jul 24, 2018
(AP Photos/Todd Kirkland, John Amis, File)

UPDATE: Secretary of State Brian Kemp beat out Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle early in the evening to become the Republican gubernatorial candidate. Kemp will face Democrat Stacey Abrams in the November election.

Unofficial results show Geoff Duncan with 50.16 percent of the Republican vote for lieutenant governor and Brad Raffensberger with 61.75 percent of the Republican vote for secretary of state.

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(AP Photo/Jaime Henry-White)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as qualifying continues for the 2018 Georgia elections, the 6th District Congressional Race draws a surprise Democratic candidate.  The race may now become a referendum on gun control.  At the State Capitol, time is running out for Cobb County leaders to decide whether they want to join a highly-touted regional transit funding plan.  Plus, the ACLU accuses a Georgia sheriff’s office of hosting a conference featuring a known anti-Muslim, a poll that shows one GOP candidate for governor gaining support, and why House Speaker Paul Ryan is coming to Atlanta.

Georgia's Win List

Today on “Political Rewind,” in the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre, both Democratic candidates for governor say they support action to curb gun abuses. How will that play with conservative Georgia voters?

Then, we look at the first face-off between those candidates, Stacey Abrams and Stacey Evans, which took place at the Carter Center Monday night.

Dem Candidates For Governor Spar Over Education, Protests

Oct 3, 2017
Georgia's Win List

Georgia's Democratic hopefuls for governor sparred Monday over who is the better advocate for public education, while rehashing the details of a national liberal conference this summer where activists booed one of the candidates off the stage.

President Trump and his allies aren't exactly running the playbook Republicans want him to ahead of the 2018 midterms. And that could be costly for the GOP at the ballot box next year.

Throughout the Trump presidency, Democrats have had one glimmer of optimism looking ahead to 2018. Polls continue to show that the party is well ahead of Republicans on the "generic ballot" — the term for when pollsters ask voters which party they would like to win the House of Representatives in the next election, or which party's House candidate they would likely vote for.

One provision of the Senate's health care bill stands to be quite popular: the Better Care Reconciliation Act would eliminate the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate. That would be repealed immediately.

Another would likely please the Republican base: defunding Planned Parenthood for a year. Those funds would disappear right away, too.

Another would threaten health care coverage for millions of Americans: a rollback to the Medicaid expansion. That change wouldn't start until 2021.

Defeat is an orphan.

Summing up the left's response to its deflating loss in a special congressional election in the Atlanta suburbs were two reactions:

1. Jim Dean, chairman of the progressive activist group Democracy For America, in a statement:

Washington has a big problem to solve: Can it stop cyber mischief, trolls and disinformation from becoming as much a part of American elections as yard signs, straw hats and robocalls?

National security officials warn that unless the United States takes strong steps to prevent or deter meddling, foreign nations — especially Russia — won't quit.

In response to President Trump's surprising firing Tuesday night of FBI Director James Comey, congressional Republicans largely maintained a united front and resisted calls for a special prosecutor to helm the ongoing investigation into Russia and the election.

However, cracks in that unity began to emerge in the day that followed, with key senators and some vulnerable House members voicing concern over how the White House handled Comey's dismissal.