On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9 a.m.

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays.

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit our Facebook group.

PBS/GPB

The Great American Read has started a national conversation about America's favorite books. For the PBS series, you are invited to join in — and vote —  for your favorite. GPB has designed a quiz that reveals which fictional character you most resemble.


 

On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Jun 27, 2018
GPB

Georgia's new hands-free driving law goes into effect Sunday, July 1. The Georgia General Assembly passed House Bill 673 earlier this year, and last month it was signed by Governor Nathan Deal. This new law requires drivers to use hands-free technology when using cell phones and other electronic devices while driving. Writing, sending or reading any text-based communication, including a text message, instant message, e-mail or internet data while holding your device is prohibited.


Emmanuel Johnson / NextGen Radio

Atlanta sports fans, rejoice. The Braves are leading the National League - East by four games. Atlanta United continues to dominate the Eastern Conference in Major League Soccer, and landed six of its players on the all star game roster for this year. Plus, the Atlanta Dream is ranked third in the Eastern Conference of the WNBA, despite a close loss to the Chicago Sky on June 27.


cameronestrada / Flickr

Starting this Sunday, Georgia drivers will no longer be able to hold phones while driving. We were curious about which other activities have been considered unsafe while driving. A little digging revealed that ever since humans sat behind the wheel, they've found reasons to take their eyes off the road — and at some time and place in American history, laws have been proposd to ban just about all of them. One of the first distractions? The car radio. 

U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Sadie Colbert

Georgia's new hands-free driving law goes into effect Sunday, July 1. The Georgia General Assembly passed House Bill 673 earlier this year, and last month it was signed by Governor Nathan Deal. This new law requires drivers to use hands-free technology when using cell phones and other electronic devices while driving. Writing, sending or reading any text-based communication, including a text message, instant message, e-mail or internet data while holding your device is prohibited.


GPB

Before the end of his term as Atlanta mayor, Kasim Reed announced the expansion of Piedmont Park. The Atlanta City Council recently approved the $100 million expansion. It would require $80 million from the private sector and $20 million would be given by the city of Atlanta.

 

 


HDS Community Garden / Flickr

In one way or another, access to green space — or lack thereof — affects all 10 million Georgians. Around the state, communities are looking for ways to help everyone get outside and lead healthier lives. In Macon, there’s Georgia’s first urban agrihood. In Savannah, there’s a campaign underway to make bicycles more accessible and safe roadways more available. And in Athens, a network of community gardens and farmers markets helps educate and empower everyone from school children to seniors.

 


Bill Bishoff / Flickr

Before the end of his term as Atlanta mayor, Kasim Reed announced the expansion of Piedmont Park. The Atlanta City Council recently approved the $100 million expansion. It would require $80 million from the private sector and $20 million would be given by the city of Atlanta.

 

 


Summer Evans / GPB

The Atlanta Jewish Times has a history as varied and complicated as the community it covers. In 1924, the Southern Israelite was founded as a family-owned paper. The name changed in the 1980s, when it was bought by a Jewish paper in Baltimore. A series of buy-outs and editorial hand-offs later, Michael Jacobs became editor — a position he's held twice in the past 13 years. 


On Second Thought For Friday, June 22, 2018

Jun 22, 2018
GPB

Georgia has the nation’s third largest rural school population, but less than 30 percent of those students attend a big college or university. Part of the explanation is that students from rural areas are more likely to come from low-income households, and transitioning from a small town to a big city can both be daunting and financially nerve-racking for students thinking about college. We talked to Marjorie Poss, a guidance counselor at Pickens High School, about why students decide to stay close to home and how these fears can be overcome. We also spoke with Hannah Velcoff, a student who made the leap from Dawson County to New York University.


AlbertHerring / Wikimedia Commons

One-third of today's college students are the first in their families to enroll in college, according to the U.S. Department of Education. But first-generation college students often encounter greater financial hardship, overwhelmingly bureaucratic paperwork and the difficulty of navigating an environment with which they perhaps don't have much familiarity.


Jayingram11 / Wikimedia Commons

For the last five years, Georgia State University has awarded more bachelor's degrees to African-Americans than any other nonprofit college or university in the country. Serving more than 30,000 students — GSU became the state's largest university in 2015, when it merged with Georgia Perimeter College — the university has also brought up its graduation rate by more than 20 percent since 2003. So how did GSU get to be a paragon of personalizing education for all students? 


Wikimedia Commons

Georgia has the nation’s third largest rural school population, but less than 30 percent of those students attend a big college or university. Part of the explanation is that students from rural areas are more likely to come from low-income households, and transitioning from a small town to a big city can both be daunting and financially nerve-racking for students thinking about college.


 

Library of Congress

Following intense criticism, President Trump signed an executive order Wednesday that ends the separation of parents and children who entered the country illegally. On today's show we explored the differences between illegal and legal immigration, detainment and internment and the role of morality and racism in immigration policy and practice.


Investigative Reporters and Editors

The city of Atlanta has received many honors over the years. In 1996, we were awarded the Summer Olympics. Next year, we'll host the Super Bowl. And this past weekend, Atlanta received the Golden Padlock Award. Given each year by a committee of investigative reporters and editors, that dubious distinction is awarded every year to the most secretive government agency or official.


June is Pride Month. This year, Atlanta’s Pride Committee and the LGBT Institute at the Center for Civil and Human Rights are partnering with the Fox Theatre to celebrate the 49th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which ignited an equal rights movement in what became the LGBT community. We spoke with Emmy Award-winning comedian Wanda Sykes, who’s headlining a comedy show at the Fox in celebration of Pride Month.


On Second Thought for Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Jun 19, 2018
GPB

The history of Juneteenth goes like this: President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. But two years later, on June 19, 1865, slaves in Texas finally got the news that they were free. Now Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. However, many people have never heard of the holiday or even celebrate it. Historian and storyteller Lillian Grant Baptiste joined us from Savannah to give the history of Juneteenth and why people should celebrate the holiday.


Library of Congress

African-American history goes far beyond Black History Month in February. Today we talked about the presentation of history and how it’s changing and confronting new layers of truth. Recently, several museums and African-American exhibits have been built around the country.


 

Austin History Center / Austin Public Library

June 19 is Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. However, many people have never heard of the holiday or even celebrate it. Historian and storyteller Lillian Grant Baptiste joined us from Savannah to give the history of Juneteenth and why people should celebrate the holiday.


Atlanta Celebrates Juneteenth

Jun 19, 2018
Summer Evans / GPB

Atlantans gathered this past weekend to celebrate Juneteenth, the day in 1865 when Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas to announce the abolition of slavery and the end of the Civil War. That came two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. In 2011, Georgia  became the 37th state to recognize Juneteenth as a state holiday. 


KENNYLEON.COM

On Second Thought introduces a new series of conversations with influential Georgians with Tony Award-winning director Kenny Leon. Long before he made it to Broadway and the silver screen, Leon made a deep impression on Atlanta's arts and culture scene.


On Second Thought for Friday, June 15, 2018

Jun 15, 2018
GPB

The United Methodist Children’s Home reports there are more than 15,000 children in Georgia's foster care system — and that number is growing. But because of the increased need, UMCH has to say turn away children in need at least 40 times a week, so it reached out to churches for help. That's how Brett Hillesheim started fostering children. Hillesheim has fostered 18 kids within the past few years, and he now works with UMCH. 


Leighton Rowell / GPB

Celebrated the month after Mother's Day, Father's Day can sometimes seem like an afterthought — or perhaps even a dad joke, if you will. But according to the Pew Research Center, dads are just as likely as moms to see parenting as central to their identity. So how do we change the way some people see fathers as playing second fiddle to mothers, or the vice presidents of the family? We asked three dads and On Second Thought regulars: Tony Harris, Adam Ragusea and Hector Fernandez

 


A Seat at the Table / GPB

One of the biggest stereotypes about black Americans is “the absent black father.” A 2013 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows 72 percent of non-Hispanic, black women who gave birth were unmarried. However, being unmarried doesn’t mean the father isn’t involved. The CDC study also shows black men are more likely to be involved in their children’s lives compared to white men.


Leighton Rowell / GPB

Father's Day is this Sunday, so we handed the mic over to a dad whom we at On Second Thought know well: "Breakroom" regular Christian Zsilavetz. Zsilavetz, a queer-identified transman who co-founded Pride School Atlanta, has two daughters: Zoe and Emmalee. He and Zoe, who is exactly nine and a half years old, stopped by the studio to record a special father-daughter interview.

 


Courtesy Brett Hillesheim

The United Methodist Children’s Home reports there are more than 15,000 children in Georgia's foster care system — and that number is growing. But because of the increased need, UMCH has to say turn away children in need at least 40 times a week, so it reached out to churches for help.


On Second Thought for Thursday, June 14, 2018

Jun 14, 2018
GPB

Flannery O’Connor is regarded by many as Georgia’s greatest fiction writer. Her books are written with dark humor, eccentric characters, and it’s all set in a devout Catholic faith. All of which made her a leading voice in southern gothic literature.

 

 


Mariam Akbar / GPB

Most of America’s history has the experiences of food segregated. Everything differentiated between white and black Americans from: where you shopped, how you ate, what you ate, and the value of certain cuisines. Todd Richards, an Atlanta chef and owner of Richard’s Southern Fried just released his newest book about the ever-changing southern recipes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wikimedia Commons

Flannery O’Connor is regarded by many as Georgia’s greatest fiction writer. Her books are written with dark humor, eccentric characters, and it’s all set in a devout Catholic faith. All of which made her a leading voice in southern gothic literature.

 


Simon Bierwald / Flickr

Collagically Speaking is a collage of audio work, consisting of different vibes of music. That’s according to Multi Grammy award winning Jazz musician, Robert Glasper. He assembled superband, R + R =Now.  

 

 


 

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