On Second Thought

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday Through Friday 9 a.m.

On Second Thought is a one-hour, daily news talk show that airs at 9 a.m. ET weekdays.

Call us at 404-500-9457, tweet us @OSTtalk or visit our Facebook group.

Today on the show, we surveyed the state to discuss issues of educational policy, in addition to farming after Hurricane Michael.

GPB reporter Grant Blankenship spoke about about gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams and Brian Kemp's visions for Georgia's education system. We also spoke with farmers, comissioners, and representatives from the Georgia Farm Bureau about the devastating loss of crops in southeast and southwest Georgia due to hurricane damage.

Georgia Department of Agriculture

Hurricane Michael swept across south Georgia last week, devastating the state's pecan orchards, cotton plants, chicken coops and peanut crops. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) administrator Brock Long said Monday the true cost of the devastation won't be clear for some time. Irwin County pecan grower Randy Hudson and Berrien County cotton grower Mark Peele told "On Second Thought" they expect it could take generations for Georgia farmers to recoup their losses — if ever.

"You can't walk away, but then I'm sitting here with such a dead load," said Hudson, a fifth-generation pecan farmer. "How do I repay this now? How do I start over?"


Georgia Department of Agriculture

President Donald Trump was in Georgia Monday to survey the damage from Hurricane Michael. The storm killed at least 19 people. Michael also ravaged Georgia's agriculture industry, splitting decades — and even centuries — old pecan trees down the middle and stripping cotton plants across thousands of acres in South Georgia.

 

"We lead the nation in pecan production, peanut production, forest products production ... in cotton and vegetables, but, unfortunately, today, we lead in destruction," Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black told "On Second Thought."


Courtesy of Beau Cabell / The Telegraph

The Georgia gubernatorial candidates are campaiging on opposing views about the future of the education system. Democratic candidate Stacey Abrams is in favor of funding wrap-around services by ending the state's private school scholarship program. Republican candidate Brian Kemp wants to expand the program.

 

We spoke to GPB reporter Grant Blankenship about these two visions for education, along with the choices parents have between private and public schools.

A record 6.9 million Georgians are registered to vote in the midterm elections. Some will start voting Monday, as in-person early voting officially begins.

Today on the show we explore different aspects of voting in Georgia, from the 53,000 voter registrations on hold to what actually happens to a ballot once it's cast.


Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

A record 6.9 million Georgians are registered to vote in the midterm elections. Some will start voting Monday, as in-person early voting officially begins. That made us wonder: How does Georgia's election process work? Are fears of hacking and mistrust of the system justified? And, what happens to your ballot once it's cast?


Voter casting his ballot in Sandy Springs, Ga.
John Bazemore, File / AP Photo

Monday is the first day of early voting in Georgia, which runs through Nov. 2. If you signed up to vote early, what do you have to do? Where do you do it? And what is a "provisional ballot?"

 


Fotografia cnj/Flickr

As in-person early voting gets underway, 53,000 of Georgia voter registrations are on hold. The secretary of state's office cites discrepancies in the applications and a violation of the "Exact Match" law, which was passed in 2017.

 


gay pride parade georgia lgbtq
Gee Double You / Flickr

Most American cities celebrate LGBTQ Pride in June to commemorate the Stonewall Riots. In 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a bar in New York's Greenwich Village. The raid led to organizing and demonstrations by activists like Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera.

 

Atlanta and Savannah both celebrate pride in October, which is national LGBTQ history month. We spoke with Jamie Fergerson, executive director of the Atlanta Pride Committee, and Dusty Church, festival director for Savannah Pride. They discussed the past, present, and future of pride in Georgia.

 


Jeff James/Flickr

History will take place inside Atlanta's new Mercedes Benz stadium next year when the city hosts Super Bowl 53. We don't know which teams will face off, but the halftime entertainment has already made headlines and several unhappy fans on social media. 

Jim Crow laws gave rise to horrific violence, humilitation and race-based terror, which makes "The Burning House: Jim Crow and the Making of Modern America," a new examination of segregation as a means of protecting African-American culture all the more provocative. 


Josephine Bennett/GPB News

Florida and Georgia are left picking up the pieces following Hurricane Michael.

The storm claimed the lives of at least 11 people, including an 11-year old girl old girl who died after a tree fell on her home in Seminole County. Michael also has left damages amounting to billions of dollars, which will affect Georgia's agriculture activities. Utility crews around the state were still working to restore power to thousands on Friday.


Courtesy Saint Lous University / Yale University Press

Jim Crow laws gave rise to horrific violence, humilitation and race-based terror, which makes "The Burning House: Jim Crow and the Making of Modern America," a new examination of segregation as a means of protecting African-American culture all the more provocative. 


 

Hurricane Michael makes landfall in Florida on Wednesday. The hurricane is expected to hit the northeastern coast of Georgia and continue through the southwest and center of the state, according to the National Weather Service. We spoke with Marshall Shepherd, the program director for atmospheric sciences at the University of Georgia, about tracking the hurricane over the week and how meterologists convey the severity of storms. We also spoke with Gwen Cooper, an author and pet rescue expert about what to do with pets during extreme weather.


Courtesy Wildsam

"Wildsam" is not your typical travel guide. Created by LaGrange, Georgia, native Taylor Bruce, the highly-designed, pocket-sized Wildsam Field Guide has no starred ratings or glossy photos. Described as existing between a magazine and a guidebook, each Wildsam is instead filled with illustrations and longform essays, interviews with locals and essential knowledge about a place's history as well as critical issues it faces today. The aim, Bruce said, is to give travelers a true sense of place, regardless of where they're from or where they're going. This time, Wildsam is sending travelers across the American South with its newest Road Trip guide.


A new oral history project reaches back over the decades for stories of black queer people in Atlanta. It highlights shifting sites of connectedness across the city.

Ashley Coleman Taylor is the principle investigator for the oral history project as well as an instructor of women's studies at Agnes Scott College. She spoke about the importance of centering black queer stories in Atlanta. We also spoke with Rev. Duncan Teague, from Abundant LUUv Unitarian Universalist Church, who worked with Taylor on the project.


Weather hurricane michael hurricane
Brendan Farrington / Associated Press

Hurricane Michael makes landfall in Florida on Wednesday. The hurricane is expected to later hit Southwest and Central Georgia, according to the National Weather Service.

We spoke with Marshall Shepherd, the program director for atmospheric sciences at the University of Georgia, about tracking the hurricane over the week and how meterologists convey the severity of storms. We also spoke with Gwen Cooper, an author and pet rescue expert about what to do with pets during extreme weather.


Georgia has the seventh highest rate of uninsured children in the country. The problem is especially severe in low-income communities. The report from Voices of Georgia's Children shows 80 percent of Georgia children who were eligible for medicaid or Peachcare in 2016 weren't enrolled. Virginia Prescott spoke with executive director from Voices of Georgia's Children, Erica Sitkoff, and editor of Georgia Health News, Andy Miller, about the barriers Georgians face.


LaRaven Taylor/GPB

Being a teenager today is difficult enough. For many, shifting definitions of sexual orientation adds layers of adolescent angst. A new young adult novel from The New York Times bestselling author Nic Stone follows how questions of gender and identity play out in the lives of three teens in a Decatur high school.

Onlinemediarelease/Flickr

Georgia has the seventh highest rate of uninsured children in the country. The problem is especially severe in low-income communities. The report from Voices of Georgia's Children shows 80 percent of Georgia children who were eligible for medicaid or Peachcare in 2016 weren't enrolled.

Bubba73 (Jud McCranie) / Wikimedia Commons

A startling number of children eligible for Medicaid or PeachCare in Georgia still don’t have insurance coverage, a recent study has found. Another reason kids don’t see doctors as often as they should is also a factor for adults: access. It’s not just cost, but the lack of physicians, especially in rural Georgia.


There aren't many African-American males who play lead roles in superhero or Sci-Fi films. 

Jessica Handler

Jessica Handler is author of "Braving The Fire: A Guide to Writing About Grief and Invisible Sisters: A Memoir." Handler gave her list of favorite southern books. Her forthcoming novel, "Magnetic Girl" will be available in 2019.


Brandon Bush/Twitter

Now we add some more songs to our essential Georgia playlist from Brandon Bush. We ask artists to pick two songs written or performed by another Georgian that best represent the state.

Brandon Bush is a member of Train and a studio musician who worked on songs by John Mayer and Sugarland.

 


Myles Truitt/Twitter

There aren't many African-American males who play lead roles in superhero or Sci-Fi films. Earlier this year, we got a taste of representation in "Black Panther." The movie made more than $1 billion in less than a month. "Kin" is a new Sci-fi film, starring a young black man.


CollageMaker / NPR

David Sedaris is a pioneer. Twenty-six years ago, the humorist busted through public radio’s polite veneer as a begrudging department store elf in "The SantaLand Diaries." Ten books later, Sedaris is a best-selling author who draws thousands of fans to his public readings. He writes frequently and candidly about his wisecracking, eccentric family. "Calypso," his newest collection of essays, is no exception. Virginia Prescott asked Sedaris about family, aging and writing about the negative when he stopped by GPB on his last sweep through Georgia. 


The U.S. Senate plans to vote this Friday on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Given his record, predictions are that Kavanaugh will shift the court to a conservative majority. That got us wondering about what cases are on the docket for the term that began on Monday. We spoke with Fred Smith, Jr. about cases to watch during the 2018-2019 term. Smith is an associate professor of law at Emory University School of Law.

Twitter / A3C

When Hip-Hop hit big in the early '70s, classics flooded out from New York and Los Angeles. Then came Atlanta, and we had A3C, a hip-hop music festival and conference for all three coasts.

Kjetil Ree/Flickr

The U.S. Senate plans to vote this Friday on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Given his record, predictions are that Kavanaugh will shift the court to a conservative majority. That got us wondering about what cases are on the docket for the term that began on Monday. We spoke with Fred Smith, Jr. about cases to watch during the 2018-2019 term. Smith is an associate professor of law at Emory University School of Law.

Next Monday, public schools and state offices across Georgia close to mark Columbus Day. Five states, more than 50 cities and dozens of universities no longer observe the federal holiday. Most instead celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day. After a unanimous vote this summer, South Fulton became the first city in Georgia to recognize Indigenous Peoples’ Day. On Second Thought’s Virginia Prescott spoke with Mayor Pro Tem Mark Baker about the ctiy's new holiday. 

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