Political Rewind

GPB Statewide and GPB Atlanta Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 2pm

The political game in Georgia is more dynamic than ever. From local elected officials to state and federal government, we're facing complicated issues. On "Political Rewind" we take the time four days a week to break down these issues, speaking directly to the decision makers in a respectful and civil manner. We not only get you caught up on what has happened in this fast-changing political world, we look ahead so that you will know what to expect. Tune in on GPB or watch via Facebook Live every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday.

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Stacey Evans, Loretta Lepore, Bill Nigut, Michael Owens, Jim Galloway and Leo Smith at the Political Rewind Town Hall in Atlanta, GA.
GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, with election day now just three weeks from today, the Brian Kemp Campaign doubles down on their accusations that Stacey Abrams is encouraging undocumented residents to cast ballots. On the other side, the Abrams campaign steps up their claims that Kemp, who currently serves as Georgia's secretary of state, is engaged in an effort to suppress votes of likely Democratic voters.


Voter casting his ballot in Sandy Springs, Ga.
John Bazemore, File / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, polls are open for Early Voting in Georgia and Election Day is just three weeks away. How will early voting shape the outcome of the races across the state?


Democratic candidate for governor Stacey Abrams.
GPB

Today on Political Rewind, Democratic gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams discusses her campaign plans with less than a month ahead of the 2018 Election.


Left: Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., during a town hall event, in Natick, Mass. Right: Donald Trump Jr. speaks at a rally in Orlando, Fla.
Steven Senne, John Raoux / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, new polls continue to predict that Democrats will make strong gains in the United States House of Representatives and potentially take a majority after the 2018 Midterm Elections. Are Georgia’s Democratic congressional candidates going to follow the national trend or will the state’s voters keep incumbent Republicans in office?


Political Rewind: Campaign Fundraising Breaks Records

Oct 9, 2018
Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photos/John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, candidates for governor in Georgia continue to break campaign finance records. Reports show that Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp have collected more than $20 million in campaign contributions just this summer. With less than a month until Election Day, how will the candidates spend their cash?


Reagan: An American Journey
Bob Spitz

On this edition of Political Rewind, author Bob Spitz details the legacy of the 40th U.S. President Ronald Reagan. The parallels between Reagan and Donald Trump are clear, but so are the contrasts in their style of leadership and the emotional chords they struck in the American people

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Left, Brian Kemp poses with supporters in Middle Georgia. RIght, Stacey Abrams poses with singer-songwriter John Legend
@BrianKempGA / @StaceyAbrams / Twitter

On this edition of Political Rewind, it's Hollywood versus Hawkinsville on the campaign trail. Democrat Stacey Abrams hopes support from celebrity names will energize young voters while Republican candidate Brian Kemp looks for votes closer to home during his rural county bus tour. Which strategy will prevail? 

The Senate voted Friday to end debate on Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court. What impact will the bitter fight over the nomination process have on the midterm elections?

Panelists:

Stacey Evans -- Former Gubernatorial Candidate

In this Sept. 6, 2018, photo, President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh waits to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee for the third day of his confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington.
(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the confirmation vote on Brett Kavanaugh looms, Georgia’s two U.S. Senators align.


Aerial view of the United States Capitol building.
Carol M. Highsmith / Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we ask whether the spectacle playing out in the U.S. Senate tarnished its reputation. This week, the United States Supreme Court began a new term with eight justices sitting on the bench. As the battle over who will fill the next seat continues, how will the court proceed to preserve its reputation and act as a non-partisan arbiter of justice?


Rebecca Hammel / U.S. Senate Photographic Studio

On this edition of Political Rewind, the battle over education plans between the candidates for governor in Georgia heats up on the campaign trail. 


The Governor's Mansion in Atlanta Georgia is a a three-floor, 30-room, Greek Revival style home built in 1967, stands on approximately 18 acres in northeast Atlanta.
www.georgia.gov

On this edition of Political Rewind, as candidates prepare for another week of fundraising and campaign speeches, a new poll from Landmark Communications shows Georgians are evenly divided on which candidate they vote into office on Nov. 6.


Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

Georgians are divided and somewhat more in favor of Brett Kavanaughs' Supreme Court nomination than those who oppose it, after hearing from both Kavanaugh and the woman who accused him of sexual assault, Dr. Christine Blasey Ford.  A new poll done by Landmark Communications shows that Georgians currently support the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the United States Supreme court by a margin of 49 percent to 43 percent. 

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, education becomes a forefront issue on the campaign trail in Georgia. What will each candidate offer and how will their proposals improve rural education without causing large tax increases? 


Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets Sen. David Perdue on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, our panel recaps the latest updates from a contentious week on capitol hill. How are Republican politicians in Georgia responding to the emotional testimony from both Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh?


GOP candidate for governor Brian Kemp.
Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp hopes to give public school teachers in Georgia a raise. The Republican candidate for governor says he will give teachers a permanent $5,000 annual pay raise, a plan that would cost taxpayers around $600 million a year.


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, after running three years behind and several billion dollars over budget, partners in Georgia Powers Plant Vogtle Nuclear Plant vote to continue funding the expansion project. Critics have fought against Vogtle's expansion, citing cost and safety concerns. We discuss whether or not the future of the project is in danger. 


Brett Kavanaugh appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee for the third day of his confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite, File / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court faces a make or break week, Sen. David Perdue (R-Georgia) urges his colleagues to take its time in vetting the allegations of sexual assault.


Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets Sen. David Perdue on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, evangelical leaders and GOP politicians are continuing to voice their support for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh even as the controversy over allegations of sexual assault continue to cloud his confirmation.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, both Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams are focusing on education and school safety this week on the campaign trail. We’ll discuss the nuanced differences between each candidate’s proposals and how they plan to fund their efforts.

A new voting machine which prints a paper record sits on display at a polling site in Conyers, Ga.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Federal Judge Amy Totenberg denied a group’s request to require the state to switch to paper ballots. Georgia’s 27,000 electronic voting machines will remain in use for November’s election. But she said that Georgia's election officials have "buried their heads in the sand" on the issue of voting vulnerabilities.


Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Senate Judiciary Committee might have to delay their vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh after sexual assault allegations have surfaced.


Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp thinks there is a gang problem in Georgia and has laid out his plans for a new group to battle the issue. The Republican candidate for governor has come under scrutiny for figures he used to highlight the problem.


Voter casting his ballot in Sandy Springs, Ga.
John Bazemore, File / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s voting infrastructure and security is the focus of a lawsuit being argued in federal court. With the election less than two months away, election officials say a last-minute change to paper ballots would cause chaos, while voter security advocates hope United States District Court Judge Amy Totenberg will require the state to replace the touchscreen machines with paper ballots.  


Political Rewind: The Divide Over Medicaid

Sep 11, 2018

On this edition of Political Rewind, Stacey Abrams unveils a proposal she says will provide health care to the neediest Georgians.  The Kemp campaign says Abrams’ plan to expand Medicaid is a non-starter, but they have yet to announce how they’ll address a problem voters say is high on their list of priorities.


From left: incumbent U.S. Rep. Karen Handel, candidate for lieutenant governor, Sarah Riggs Amico, candidate for governor Stacey Abrams.
(AP Photo/John Bazemore, GPB News/Stephen Fowler)

On this edition of Political Rewind, there are an unprecedented number of women running for office this year, and a majority of Americans are happy to see the increase.


Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
JOHN AMIS, FILE) / AP PHOTOS

On this edition of Political Rewind, a new poll shows the race between Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams is a virtual tie. The numbers also show how Georgian’s feel about President Donald Trump’s job performance.


David Goldman / AP Photo/File

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp’s campaign will soon get another boost from the Trump Administration when Vice President Mike Pence visits Atlanta next week for a campaign rally. The White House endorsement made a big difference in the Republican primary, but will it have a similar impact for the general election?


Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brett Kavanaugh appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week in hopes of becoming the next justice to sit on the United States Supreme Court. Chaos and pandemonium marked the start of Kavanaugh’s hearing as democratic senators on the Judiciary Committee moved to delay the hearings.


Beth Macy

On this edition of Political Rewind, for six years, Roanoke-based journalist Beth Macy watched the opioid crisis unfold in struggling Appalachian communities all around her. And so she began documenting the roles that a pharmaceutical industry hungry for profit, medical practitioners intent on easing pain and government agencies slow to recognize the crisis all played in allowing a devastating plague of addiction to grip the entire region.


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