Sanders Delegate Describes Feeling Of Being 'Bullied' Into Backing Clinton

Oct 26, 2016
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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

With this presidential election season nearly at an end, we're returning to some voices we heard along the way. Yesterday I checked back with two Republican voters, and today my colleague Audie Cornish is talking with Democrats.

AUDIE CORNISH, BYLINE: The first will be Anita Lynch of Colorado. I met her at the Democratic National Convention in July where she was a delegate for Bernie Sanders. Anita, welcome back.

ANITA LYNCH: Hi. Thanks.

CORNISH: So when we last spoke at the convention, I asked whether you would support Hillary Clinton, and that was after obviously a very contentious primary. And you said your feelings were still too raw to answer. How do you feel today?

LYNCH: Well, not feeling quite as raw but still feeling a little cynical. I've watched all three debates, and of course it's as I've said from the beginning. I am not voting for Trump. That's a given. But I think that some of what's happened, too, is there's still this feeling of being a bit bullied and shamed into voting for Hillary.

I actually met with two strong Hillary people after the convention 'cause I wanted to hear what they had to say. I wanted to hear their perspective. I really wanted to try to understand. And one of the things I said to them was, convince me to vote for Hillary and two things I want you to leave out the conversation - the word Trump and the words Supreme Court. And then tell me why I should vote for Hillary. And...

CORNISH: Were they able to do it?

LYNCH: Not totally, not totally, no. They were kind of stymied. They sat there for a minute and were a bit stymied.

CORNISH: So who are you going to vote for for president?

LYNCH: I still don't know yet. I know I'm not voting for Trump. I can tell you that. I've tried to visualize myself coloring in that circle - we have little circles that we color in - envisioning myself coloring it for Hillary, and I haven't been able to envision myself doing that.

CORNISH: How has this election changed your relationship to the Democratic Party? I mean not just the primary, but, like, to you, what's the future for your party?

LYNCH: Yeah, that's a very good question. I've been a Democrat my entire life, and I'm really very disappointed in the route that my party has taken. About one third of our Colorada Bernie delegates - the minute they got home - changed their affiliation to green. I struggled with that and decided, no, I'm going to stay in the Democratic Party and work from within.

It's been discouraging because I've seen - the establishment is hanging on by their fingernails. Obviously they do not want to give up the power, and the younger people see the world so differently. I'm not one of the younger people.

But I think that the party is out of touch with the direction that a lot of our young people are moving and that they see the world they live in in such a different world. And they see it so differently, and our party has not responded. We have seen that, and I'm staying Democrat. And - but it remains to be seen. If I don't see some changes within the establishment, I might not be a Democrat.

CORNISH: Well, Anita Lynch, thank you so much for talking with us once again, and good luck with your ballot, your decision.

CORNISH: Thank you. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.