Virginia Prescott

Host - On Second Thought

Virginia Prescott is the Gracie Award-winning host of On Second Thought for Georgia Public Broadcasting. Before joining GPB, she was host of Word of Mouth, Writers on A New England Stage and the I-Tunes Top Ten Podcasts Civics 101 and The 10-Minute Writers Workshop on New Hampshire Public Radio. Prior to joining NHPR, she was editor, producer, and director on NPR programs On Point and Here & Now, and Director of Interactive media for New York Public Radio.

Throughout her radio career, Virginia has worked to build sustainable independent radio in the developing world and has trained journalists in post-conflict zones from Sierra Leone to the Balkans. She was a member of the Peabody Award-winning production team for Jazz from Lincoln Center with Ed Bradley and the recipient of a Loeb Fellowship at Harvard University.

Virginia loves working as a radio and podcast host, but regrets that so many good outfits go unnoticed.

A Seat at the Table / GPB

One of the biggest stereotypes about black Americans is “the absent black father.” A 2013 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows 72 percent of non-Hispanic, black women who gave birth were unmarried. However, being unmarried doesn’t mean the father isn’t involved. The CDC study also shows black men are more likely to be involved in their children’s lives compared to white men.


Courtesy Brett Hillesheim

The United Methodist Children’s Home reports there are more than 15,000 children in Georgia's foster care system — and that number is growing. But because of the increased need, UMCH has to say turn away children in need at least 40 times a week, so it reached out to churches for help.


On Second Thought for Thursday, June 14, 2018

Jun 14, 2018
GPB

Flannery O’Connor is regarded by many as Georgia’s greatest fiction writer. Her books are written with dark humor, eccentric characters, and it’s all set in a devout Catholic faith. All of which made her a leading voice in southern gothic literature.

 

 


Mariam Akbar / GPB

Most of America’s history has the experiences of food segregated. Everything differentiated between white and black Americans from: where you shopped, how you ate, what you ate, and the value of certain cuisines. Todd Richards, an Atlanta chef and owner of Richard’s Southern Fried just released his newest book about the ever-changing southern recipes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wikimedia Commons

Flannery O’Connor is regarded by many as Georgia’s greatest fiction writer. Her books are written with dark humor, eccentric characters, and it’s all set in a devout Catholic faith. All of which made her a leading voice in southern gothic literature.

 


Simon Bierwald / Flickr

Collagically Speaking is a collage of audio work, consisting of different vibes of music. That’s according to Multi Grammy award winning Jazz musician, Robert Glasper. He assembled superband, R + R =Now.  

 

 


 

WikiCommons

The U.S. didn’t make the cut for the 2018 FIFA World Cup, but Americans will still be represented when competition kicks off today in Russia — by a group of student journalists from Kennesaw State University. They’re in Moscow to report, podcast and live tweet the global spectacle, and yes, this plum assignment actually counts for college credit.

 

 

 

 


On Second Thought for Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Jun 13, 2018
GPB

According the United States Census Bureau, there are nearly 50,000 homeless veterans in America. In order to combat these issues with housing, popular TV shows like “Tiny House Hunters”are looking to create tiny homes as a solution.

  

The Chatham Savannah Authority for Homeless has organized the “Tiny Home Project” in order to fight this growing problem.

 


Stacie Huckeba/Courtesy of the artist

Southern soul-rock artist, Liz Brasher performs at City Winery in Atlanta on June 17. Brasher is from a mixed family, from the Dominican Republic and Italy. But she grew up in a small town in North Carolina, where she attended a Southern Baptist church. That’s where she learned to sing in the Spanish choir and found her love for gospel music.


Evensi

Listener Nury Castillo-Crawford of Gwinnett County got in touch with On Second Thought after hearing a interview on mental health issues within immigrant communities. The guest on the show was an immigrant shielded from immigration through the federal DACA program. Nury wrote a book this year about her own experiences coming to this country as a young child from Peru. The children's book is called "3,585 Miles to be an American Girl".


Matt Harriger / Flickr

According the United States Census Bureau, there are nearly 50,000 homeless veterans in America. In order to combat these issues with housing, popular TV shows like “Tiny House Hunters” are looking to create tiny homes as a solution.

On Second Thought For Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Jun 12, 2018
GPB

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta says suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and according to a new report, the number of people who take their own lives has risen substantially since 1999. Per the report, nearly 45,000 Americans age 10 or older took their own lives in 2016. Georgia alone saw a 16 percent increase in suicides from 1999-2016. Emory University professor Nadine Kaslow and Doreen Marshall of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention say more needs to be done to prevent these tragedies.


Screenshot by GPB / YouTube

Morehouse College in Atlanta is one of the nation’s most renowned and distinguished historically black colleges. Tiago Rachelson, who is white, is one of them.


Screenshot by GPB / nytimes.com

When fashion designer Kate Spade died last week of an apparent suicide, there was an outpouring of grief, from Twitter to the front page of the New York Times. "Buying a Kate Spade handbag was a coming-of-age ritual for a generation of American women," declared the Times.


Georgia Mother Remembers Late Son

Jun 12, 2018
Screenshot by GPB / Twitter

Suicide is a leading cause of death in Georgia and has touched the lives of many people in the state. Schrence Echols of Fairburn, Georgia, lost her son Marquise Tolbert in 2012, when Tolbert took his own life.

 


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta says suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and according to a new report, the number of people who take their own lives has risen substantially since 1999. Per the report, nearly 45,000 Americans age 10 or older took their own lives in 2016. Georgia alone saw a 16 percent increase in suicides from 1999-2016.


On Second Thought For Monday, June 11, 2018

Jun 12, 2018
GPB

Every month approximately 374 girls are sexually exploited in Georgia. On average, they are 12-14 years old. Last month, the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Atlanta office collaborated with nearly 40 local law enforcement agencies to rescue 148 missing children who had become victims of human trafficking. Some were as young as three years old.To learn more about Operation Safe Summer, we spoke with FBI agent Nathan Whiteman, who spearheaded the operation.


Moultrie Creek / Flickr

The Federal Reserve's roots trace back to Georgia’s Jekyll Island. It all started in November 1910, when  six men secretly convened at the Jekyll Island Club to reform the country's banking system. The participants did not admit that the meeting happened until the 1930s.


Federal Bureau of Investigation

Every month approximately 374 girls are sexually exploited in Georgia. On average, they are 12-14 years old.

Last month, the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Atlanta office collaborated with nearly 40 local law enforcement agencies to rescue 148 missing children who had become victims of human trafficking. Some were as young as three years old. 


On Second Thought For Friday, June 8, 2018

Jun 8, 2018
GPB

Thirty-seven million Americans live in poverty today. According to the National Women's Law Center, more than half of them are women. Race, health and gender discrimination contribute to this disparity, but to learn about the economic history that led us to where we are today, we spoke with Diana Pearce and George Robb.


The Breakroom: Women And Finance

Jun 8, 2018
Summer Evans / GPB

The people who work in the financial world have long skewed male, but things are starting to balance out. Today, 47 percent of management and professional roles in American financial firms are occupied by women, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Yet Georgia women who are full-time, year-round workers still earn around 82 cents for every dollar that Georgia men earn.


    

Ilmicrofono Oggiono / Flickr

In the majority of Georgia families, mothers are the sole, primary or co-breadwinners, according to the Center for American Progress. But that doesn't mean they have the wages to adequately support themselves and their loved ones — particularly when it comes to minimum wage workers in Georgia, of whom 6 in 10 are women. And beyond the wage and wealth gap, women lack access to other things that Shilpa Phadke says are critical for their economic security: affordable child care, harassment-free work environments and quality health care. 


Social Security Administration

Thirty-seven million Americans live in poverty today. According to the National Women's Law Center, more than half are women. Race, health and gender discrimination contribute to this disparity, but to learn about the economic history that led us to where we are today, we spoke with Diana Pearce and George Robb.


Jason Reynolds didn't get through a whole book until he was 17. He's now a bestselling author, and he's trying to change the way young people feel about reading.


On Second Thought For Thursday, June 7, 2018

Jun 7, 2018
GPB

Jason Reynolds didn't get through a whole book until he was 17. He's now a bestselling author, and he's trying to change the way young people feel about reading. Inspired by hip-hop, Reynolds now writes books to get young people to excited about reading. He has various awards to his name, including an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work for Youth/Teen and a National Book Award finalist designation for his book "Ghost."

Courtesy Penguin Random House

Lauren Groff never thought she would become a Floridian, but then again she also never anticipated that her novel "Fates and Furies" would become President Obama's favorite book of the year in 2015. The bestselling author moved to Gainesville in 2006 for her husband's business. Twelve years later, she's written a collection of short stories set in the state where she says she now realizes she belongs. It's called "Florida." 


Courtesy Dust-to-Digital

"Southern" has a variety of meanings in the personal and popular imagination. It's a term that evokes history, food and musical traditions and ways of speaking. They often get lumped together, especially by those who don't know the South.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Jun 6, 2018
GPB

The Georgia 2018 legislative session recently legalized the use of cannabis oil for treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD affects about 31 million people in the United States. The disorder is often associated with veterans, but another group of heroes — first responders — also struggle with the disorder. According to one survey, one in 15 paramedics and EMTs has attempted suicide. Heather Harp, a paramedic in Atlanta, says she and her colleagues need more support in their battle against PTSD. 

Zora Neale Hurston, the celebrated Harlem Renaissance writer and anthropologist, has a new bestseller out nearly 60 years after her death. She wrote "Barracoon: The Story of The Last 'Black Cargo'" almost a century ago. It’s the nonfiction story of Oluale Kossola, the last survivor of the African slave trade in the United States. Kossola was sold into slavery and taken from West Africa when he was 19.


Ildar Sagdejev / Wikimedia Commons

The Georgia 2018 legislative session recently legalized the use of cannabis oil for treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD affects about 31 million people in the United States. The disorder is often associated with veterans, but another group of heroes — first responders — also struggle with the disorder. According to one survey, one in 15 paramedics and EMTs has attempted suicide. 


Pages