Virginia Prescott

Host - On Second Thought

Virginia Prescott is the Gracie Award-winning host of On Second Thought for Georgia Public Broadcasting. Before joining GPB, she was host of Word of Mouth, Writers on A New England Stage and the I-Tunes Top Ten Podcasts Civics 101 and The 10-Minute Writers Workshop on New Hampshire Public Radio. Prior to joining NHPR, she was editor, producer, and director on NPR programs On Point and Here & Now, and Director of Interactive media for New York Public Radio.

Throughout her radio career, Virginia has worked to build sustainable independent radio in the developing world and has trained journalists in post-conflict zones from Sierra Leone to the Balkans. She was a member of the Peabody Award-winning production team for Jazz from Lincoln Center with Ed Bradley and the recipient of a Loeb Fellowship at Harvard University.

Virginia loves working as a radio and podcast host, but regrets that so many good outfits go unnoticed.

GPB

Today, "On Second Thought" took a scan of the state.

We spoke with NPR political reporter Asma Khalid about low voter turnout, and heard from some of the Georgians she met in Houston, Cobb and Hancock counties.

GPB's own Emily Jones also joined from Savannah with a story about alligators in the Okefenokee swamp, and "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott munched on some edible bugs with University of Georgia entomologist Marianne Shockley.

We also caught up with John T. Edge of the Southern Foodways Alliance. His new series, "TrueSouth," debuts on SEC Network tonight. Chef Todd Richards also told us about his favorite Southern ingredient: collard greens. 

Sean Powers / GPB

We launched a new "On Second Thought" series on Tuesday called “Main Ingredient” in which a chef tells us about his or her essential Southern ingredient. Host Virginia Prescott heads into the kitchen with Atlanta-based chef and cookbook author, Todd Richards. He shares with us his love for collard greens.

"Bacon, Collard and Fried Egg Sandwich" by Todd Richards

SEC Network / Bluefoot Entertainment

Football and food are two mighty markers of Southern identity. The two intersect tonight when John T. Edge and Wright Thompson's new series "TrueSouth," an exploration of Southern food and culture, debuts on SEC Network. In the first episode, Edge, who directs the Southern Foodways Alliance, goes to Birmingham, Alabama, where he meets generations of Greek-Americans who transformed their community. 


EatingInsectsAthens.com

A bug in your food is not usually considered a good thing, but what if it was there on purpose?

The United Nations reports around two billion people include insects in their daily diet. Companies like Chirp Chips and Chapul are making bugs a snacking option in the United States. In Georgia, mealworms and crickets top the list of commonly consumed insects.

We spoke with entomologist Marianne Shockley who researches edible insects at the University of Georgia.


Paul Sableman / Flickr

With American politics more polarized than ever, most Americans have at least one thing in common going into midterms: they tend to stay home on Election Day. In fact, as NPR political reporter Asma Khalid has found, midterm elections have not drawn a majority of voters to the polls since the early 1900s. She set out to find out why.


GPB

Is Georgia turning blue? That question came up in 2014 when Jason Carter ran for governor, in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president and in 2017 with Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the most expensive House race in history. Every time, however, Georgia remained a red state where Republicans won. 


Grant Blankenship/GPB

Changing voter demographics and the national rise of female candidates have led to speculation that Georgia will turn blue in the November elections. We’re exploring the likelihood of this shift as well as Georgia’s role in the upcoming national elections in 2020.


Facebook

As we near this year’s November election, there’s one recurring question: Will Georgia become a blue state? Before we look at the political future of the state, we did some research on the past.

Wikimedia Commons

Is Georgia turning blue? That question came up in 2014 when Jason Carter ran for governor, in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president and in 2017 with Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the most expensive House race in history. Every time, however, Georgia remained a red state where Republicans won.


On this edition of "Two Way Street," Georgia musician Adron stops by to talk and play a few songs from her new album "Water Music" before setting sail for the west coast. We also hear from a woman who made a career of saying goodbye: Kay Powell. 


Maupin photo by Christopher Turner

On this episode of Two Way Street, we hear from two Southern writers from the Decatur Book Festival.

In front of an audience at the festival, new host Virginia Prescott interviews authors Rick Bragg and Armistead Maupin on the way their Southern heritage shapes their writing.
 


GPB

Efrain de la Rosa, a 40-year-old detainee at ICE’s Stewart detention center in Lumpkin, was found dead in his cell last Tuesday.  Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials say the preliminary cause of death was self-inflicted strangulation.  The case remains under investigation.


Jason Hales / Juel Concepts

The Atlanta, retro-styled soul band Ruby Velle and the Soulphonics stepped into our studios for a mini concert and an interview. Raised by east Indian parents in Canada, Ruby has many inspirations to thank for her classic sound (with a twist). She taps into the classic tunes of Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin, Etta James and Curtis Mayfield to unlease her powerful vocals.


(AP Photo/Kate Brumback, File)

Efrain de la Rosa, a 40-year-old detainee at ICE’s Stewart detention center in Lumpkin, was found dead in his cell last Tuesday.  Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials say the preliminary cause of death was self-inflicted strangulation.  The case remains under investigation.

 


Vox

Amy Sherald, the artist who painted the lovely portrait of Michelle Obama, was influenced by Piet Mondrian's geometric paintings and the quilts stiched by the Gee's Bend ladies. The ladies are from a tiny peninsula in Wilcox County, Alabama. The generations of women descend from slaves and live mostly in isolation. From discarded clothes like worn jeans and corduroy pants, they create vibrant geometric shapes stitched into quilts.  


(AP Photo/Themba Hadebe, Pool, File)

It’s Mandela Day!  Each year on July 18, the life, work and memory of Nelson Mandela is honored. On this day, there is a global call to do 67 minutes of service in memory of Mandela’s 67-year battle for social justice. Today would have been Mandela’s 100th birthday.


Sight-seeing Scavenger Hunts With The Clue Town Books

Jul 17, 2018
Clue Town Books / Facebook

Open a Clue Town book and embark on a mysterious walking tour through notable Georgia locations. Each scavenger hunt includes puzzles, fun graphics, and a compass to help you find your way. We sent our On Second Thought interns to various locations in Atlanta to partake in Clue Town. Our intern, Monique Bandong, brought back an audio postcard from the Oakland Cemetery scavenger hunt.

 

 


Georgia Playlist: Ruby Velle

Jul 17, 2018
Danielle Boise / Flickr

We added two more songs to our Georgia Playlist from Ruby Velle. She’s the lead singer for the Atlanta retro, soul band Ruby Velle and The Soulphonics. They will be performing at the annual Bragg Jam in Macon July 28. 


Katina Rankin/Twitter

The U.S. Department of Justice has reopened the murder case of Emmett Till, the African-American teenager killed the summer of 1955. The 14-year old was from Chicago visiting relatives in Mississippi. He was kidnapped, tortured, and killed for allegedly whistling at a white woman.


Fibonacci Blue / Flickr

Shortly after President Donald Trump signed the immigration ban, thousands of state department employees issued a dissent cable to Rex Tillerson.

RELATED: At State Department, 'Dissent Channel' In High Gear With Refugee Ban Protests

Last month, the Supreme Court decided to uphold the ban. Chris Richardson, once a former U.S. diplomat, has now become an immigration lawyer at an Atlanta firm.


GPB Sports team

High school football season is just around the corner, and students are already on the field practicing. Before teams hit the gridiron, the GPB Sports team stopped by to talk about the upcoming season.


Wikimedia Commons

E-cigarettes hit the market not too long ago as an aid to quit smoking. The CDC reported in 2015 that more than 9 million American adults vape regularly. Juuls are the new trendy e-cigarette that have become very popular among teens. It's an USB size e-cigarette that uses "pods" for the source of nicotine. College and high school campuses are having issues with the amount of teenagers who are taking on this new nicotine fad.

 

 


Is There Any More Trust In The Media?

Jul 12, 2018
Pixabay

After the shooting at the Capitol Gazette in Annapolis two weeks ago, journalists are questioning what free press means to American society. 


Ninja Puppet Productions

Raymond Carr  was raised by Christian clowns. Yes, that’s a real thing. He was also taught by the famous Jim Henson Company. He is a master puppeteer who has been all around the world working on various productions.

 

 

 


On Second Thought for Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Jul 10, 2018
GPB

Just over a year ago, the Federal Bureau of Investigation arrested a 25-year-old woman in Augusta, Georgia for allegedly leaking top secret information from the National Security Agency to the press. Last month, Reality Winner pled guilty to violating the Espionage Act. Winner was sentenced to 63 months in prison and three years of supervised release. Her prosecution is the first in the trump administration’s crackdown on whistleblowers.

 


WikiCommons

Just over a year ago, the Federal Bureau of Investigation arrested a 25-year-old woman in Augusta, Georgia for allegedly leaking top secret information from the National Security Agency to the press. Last month, Reality Winner pled guilty to violating the Espionage Act. Winner was sentenced to 63 months in prison and three years of supervised release. Her prosecution is the first in the Trump administration’s crackdown on whistleblowers.

 


The Denver Post

“The City Too Busy To Hate” wasn’t always the case for Atlanta. After the Civil Rights Act of 1964, many white residents resented that African-Americans were allowed to integrate and they flocked to the suburbs. They withdrew from public places like pools, parks, and even buses. The beginning of “white flight” had cast a shadow on Atlanta.

Now, in the last decade the “white flight” mentality has completely shifted.

 

 

 


Summer Evans / GPB

With the upcoming Trump-Putin summit this month, many are interested to see what serious issues will be discussed. But before he was president, Vladimir  Putin was recruited into the KGB operative.

Jack Barsky is also a former Russian KGB spy who recently moved to Covington, Georgia.

 

 


On Second Thought For Friday, July 6, 2018

Jul 6, 2018

Type any word into Google, and the search engine will offer a drop-down list of suggestions for what you should type next. So if you type "Russia collusion," Google suggests you complet eyour search with "delusion." And if you click on that suggestion, the first result is an opinion piece from the New York Post, followed by a Tucker Carlson interview on Fox News, plus a handful of YouTube videos from channels like Red Pill Christian Warrior.


geralt / Pixabay

It's Friday and you know what that means: It's time for On Second Thought's weekly roundtable. Today we gathered three people who work in tech to talk about their personal and professional relationships with the internet and technology.


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