Rickey Bevington

Senior Anchor/ Correspondent

As Senior Anchor/Correspondent, Rickey Bevington is a mainstay with Atlantans during the afternoon drive as local host for NPR's nationally syndicated "All Things Considered" weekdays from 4 to 7 p.m.

Bevington brings more than 15 years of award-winning experience in the media industry including cable entertainment at Sundance Channel and Showtime Networks, local TV news at WFSB-TV 3 (CBS) in Hartford, Conn., publishing with Fodor's and the Hartford Courant, and reporting for NPR and PBS. Her work is recognized by local and national journalism organizations including the Southeast Emmys, Georgia Association of Broadcasters, Public Radio News Directors Inc, Associated Press and Society of Professional Journalists.

Bevington was recognized with the prestigious "History In The Media" award by the Georgia Historical Society. In her prior role as GPB’s News Director of TV, Radio & Digital, Bevington led the news team to win two regional Emmys and GPB's first national Edward R. Murrow Award. An Atlanta native, Bevington is a believer in volunteerism and shaping her community. She serves on the Board of the Georgia Associated Press Media Editors, the Atlanta BeltLine Young Leaders Council and has served as a board member and Chairman of the Board for the Oglethorpe University Museum of Art. In March 2014, Bevington was the only Georgian appointed to a prestigious Marshall Memorial Fellowship by the German Marshall Fund of the United States. While in the post, she travels throughout Europe studying public policy issues impacting the U.S. and the European Union. Bevington participated in L.E.A.D. Atlanta, an intensive eight-month leadership program, and she is an active member of the Atlanta Press Club.

Ways to Connect

A voter enters a polling site in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017.
(AP PHOTO/DAVID GOLDMAN)

Monday night, a federal judge denied a request to move Georgia’s 159 counties to paper ballots ahead of the Nov. 6 midterm election.

But she also denied the state’s request to dismiss the lawsuit, writing that Georgia’s 16-year-old touchscreen voting system is at risk of cyberattack or other threats.

GPB's Stephen Fowler has been following the case. He spoke with GPB's Rickey Bevington about what comes next.


Joel Mclendon / Flickr/CC

A federal judge could decide as soon as tomorrow whether Georgia must switch from digital touchscreen voting machines to a paper ballot system.

A group of election integrity advocates and concerned Georgia voters say the change needs to be made before November’s election.

GPB’s Stephen Fowler was in yesterday’s hearing. He spoke to GPB's Rickey Bevington about the case.


Wikimedia Commons

Iconic American author Armistead Maupin is making two appearances at this weekend's AJC Decatur Book Festival.

The North Carolina native who gave us the “Tales of the City” is also marking the publication of a new memoir and a documentary film about his life.

Maupin joined GPB's Rickey Bevington via Facetime from his home in San Francisco.

Emerson Mnangagwa, 75, was inaugurated Sunday as president of Zimbabwe.

The ceremony took place after nearly a month of post-election turmoil — a failed legal challenge by the opposition party that claimed discrepancies in the voting, and a deadly crackdown on opposition protestors by the military.

Elections monitors from the Atlanta-based Carter Center have been in Zimbabwe to assess whether Zimbabwe's election was legitimate.

Sarah Johnson leads elections monitoring for the Carter Center and joined Rickey Bevington in the studio.


Tenderfoot TV

Americans have long been fascinated by stories of young women -- usually pretty, usually white -- who go missing. As we say in the South, they “up and vanish.”

Atlanta filmmaker Payne Lindsey tapped into this national true crime past time with his 2016 investigative podcast about Tara Grinstead -- a 30-year-old South Georgia beauty queen and high school teacher whose 2005 disappearance went unsolved for over a decade.

Now, Lindsey is back with season 2 of his hit podcast “Up and Vanished.” He joined me via Skype from Colorado, where season 2 takes place.


Cecilio Ricardo, U.S. Air Force

Aretha Franklin died yesterday at the age of 76. Raised in Detroit, her career spanned decades and genres, from gospel to jazz to her signature sound as the Queen of Soul. 

Chuck Reece is the editor-in-chief and co-founder of magazine The Bitter Southerner.

After hearing of Franklin’s passing, he published an essay called “Aretha Goes Home.”

What's In A Name? | Joyland

Aug 16, 2018
Éditions Albin Michel

There are a lot of interesting names around Atlanta, but have you ever heard of a neighborhood called Joyland?

In this "What's In A Name," we explore the "amusing" history of the South Atlanta neighborhood.


Wikimedia Commons

Transportation is a major issue on the minds of many metro Atlantans.

Several counties will be voting in the coming months on a Transportation Special Local Option Sales Tax, or TSPLOST, that could expand public transit beyond Fulton and DeKalb Counties. The municipality of Atlanta has its own decisions to make regarding transit.


Felicia Moore

Atlanta’s second-most-powerful elected official has a lot on her plate.

Felicia Moore took over as Atlanta City Council president in January amidst an ongoing federal investigation into City Hall that’s netted several bribery indictments of both employees and contractors.

What's In A Name? | Tight Squeeze

Aug 9, 2018
Earl McGehee / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejmc/with/3605494738/

Atlanta once had a neighborhood called Tight Squeeze. My colleague, Don Smith, suggested we check out this part of town that he remembers as the hangout spot for hippies in the 1970s.

 


 

What's In A Name? | Cabbagetown

Aug 1, 2018
Lee Coursey

One of the Atlanta's most curious communities is called Cabbagetown.

In this "What's In A Name," GPB's Rickey Bevington shares the humble origins of one of Atlanta's trendiest neighborhoods.


Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday morning, the Gwinnett County Commission approved a contract with MARTA and called for a transit referendum next March.

Voters will decide whether or not to join MARTA under the new regional transit agency "The ATL" and pay a penny sales tax to fund the expansion.

Tyler Estep is the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's reporter covering Gwinnett County. He was at the meeting this morning and joined me via phone to talk about the vote.


Screenshot | GA SOS app

UPDATE 10:26 a.m. Aug. 2: The "GA SOS" app has been updated to remove all social media links to Brian Kemp from the app. 

UPDATE 6:10 p.m. July 31: Brian Kemp's campaign says the secretary of state's office will remove the links on the official app. Campaign Spokesman Ryan Mahoney: “This practice is legal and common for elected officials who value accessibility and citizen engagement. However, the links will be removed so we can focus on important issues like Stacey Abrams failing to pay her taxes."

ORIGINAL STORY:

Secretary of State Brian Kemp’s office has an official app where you can check your voter registration, register a business and see election information.

It also links to his Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, which prominently feature his campaign for Governor.

That has some ethics experts wondering if it's allowed.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Tuesday's primary runoff elections saw many surprising results across Georgia.  

Perhaps the biggest was Secretary of State Brian Kemp solidly defeating Lt. Governor Casey Cagle, a longtime frontrunner in the Republican race for Georgia’s governor. 


What's In A Name? | Box Ankle

Jul 25, 2018
Town Maps USA

There's a town south of Atlanta called Box Ankle, Georgia. But how did it get its name?

At the request of listener Ginger Applegarth, we looked into the story behind Box Ankle. 


atlanta.net

If you live in or around Atlanta, you probably know how many places are named after peaches. In fact, within city limits there are 15 separate streets called Peachtree.

This installment of "What's In A Name?" answers a question from Sarah, the 8-year-old daughter of GPB's Chief Technology Officer, Adam Woodlief. She asks why everything in Georgia is called "peach."


ZOHAR LAZAR

Atlanta's Castleberry Hill neighborhood is so hot, rapper 2 Chainz opened a restaurant there. 

You may know the neighborhood west of downtown for its funky creatives and hipster lunch spots, but in the 1800s, it was a red-light district and home to Atlanta’s Snake Nation.   

What's In A Name? | Jim Crow Road

Jul 18, 2018
Michael David Murphy

In the Georgia town of Flowery Branch about 45 miles northeast of Atlanta, there is a street called Jim Crow Road. GPB Atlanta listener Chris Livingston asked us on our website to find out how the street got its regrettable name.


What's In A Name? | Lithonia

Jul 17, 2018
City of Lithonia

GPB Atlanta listener Tommy Hester asked us about the origins of the name of Lithonia, Ga.

You might see the name of this DeKalb County city as you drive down I-20, but did you know it comes from Greek? In this edition of "What's In A Name," Rickey Bevington gives us a lesson in ancient Greek.


https://www.maxpixel.net/photo-1863755

Is there an Atlanta name you're curious to know the history behind? Click on this link and write your idea in the comments section.

Listen to our summer series "What's In A Name?" during All Things Considered weekdays from 4 to 7 p.m. on Atlanta's NPR News station, 88.5 FM.

WSB-TV Atlanta

In just over a week, Lt. Governor Casey Cagle and Secretary of State Brian Kemp face off in the Republican runoff for Georgia's gubernatorial race.

Recent polling shows Cagle in a tight race with Kemp.

On Monday, Cagle landed a big co-sign from current Governor Nathan Deal. GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been tracking endorsements. He joined me in the studio to discuss Deal’s endorsement and the final days of the runoff election.


What's In A Name? | Druid Hills

Jul 16, 2018

Druid Hills is one of Atlanta's best-known neighborhoods — and streets.

In this "What's In A Name," as requested by listeners Forest McMullen and Lisa Mount, we dive into the unexpected history of the northeast Atlanta neighborhood.


What's In A Name? | Snapfinger Road

Jul 10, 2018
Getty Images

Listener Jireh Rowdan told us he can picture Snapfinger Road's first residents jamming out with washboards and jugs, snapping their fingers to the beat. 

Today's "What's In A Name" reveals the real (and unfortunately less jolly) history behind the Decatur street's name.


The Human Footprint

Many Atlanta roads are named after local waterways — but where do those creeks and springs get their names?

In this episode of "What's In A Name," we explore three names listeners were curious about: Beaver Ruin Road, Ponce de Leon Avenue and Foe Killer Creek.


Atlanta Journal Constitution

Atlanta is legendary for its terrible traffic. One intersection is so infamous, hip-hop duo Outkast wrote an entire song about it. Let's take a look at the Tom Moreland Interchange, more commonly known as Spaghetti Junction.


Wikimedia Commons

You may be used to navigating through Atlanta's 15 streets named Peachtree, but another road's name has been confusing locals for years. As listener Jean Smith wonders, “Why is there a difference in the spelling of Clairemont Avenue and Clairmont Road?"


Google Images

While its name may (literally) be "Bland," its history is anything but. 

The idea for this episode of "What's In A Name" comes from our Georgia Public Broadcasting colleague Virginia Prescott, who asks about the Blandtown neighborhood of Atlanta, just west of Atlantic Station.


Atlanta Journal Constitution Archives

A catchy tune from 70s funk group The Spirit of Atlanta is the only remnant of this Atlanta community. 

 

In our first edition of "What's In A Name," we look at the lost Atlanta neighborhood of Buttermilk Bottom.

 


The Atlanta neighborhood of Buckhead was named after a dead deer. African-American families in the early 20th century picked "Just Us" to call their new neighborhood south of downtown. The developer of Wieuca Road named it after his three daughters: Wilma, Eugenia, Catherine - Wi-eu-ca (pronounced WHY-yoo-cuh).

All summer long here on All Things Considered we’re telling stories about some of Atlanta’s most interesting names.

We’re calling it “What’s In A Name?”

Viola Davis

More women are running for elected office this fall. The number of female candidates for U.S. Congress has doubled since 2016.

In Georgia, DeKalb County activist Viola Davis launched a last minute campaign to unseat her longtime representative in last month's primary election — and she won.

GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been following the midterm elections, and he joined Rickey Bevington in the studio to talk about this race and the greater context of women running for office.


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