LaRaven Taylor

On Second Thought Producer

LaRaven was born and raised in Jackson, Mississippi, so she’s no stranger to the south. LaRaven developed a passion for storytelling at a very young age. She became a features editor on her high school’s newspaper staff and an anchor on the school’s station. She graduated from the University of Southern Mississippi with a degree in Journalism. She started working as an Associate Producer for WLBT in Jackson, MS. There, she worked her way up to become a senior producer. She also did some reporting. LaRaven is a member of NABJ and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. She loves reading, traveling, and spending time with her family. She lives by the quote: “I think, therefore I am” by Descartes.

GPB

Efrain de la Rosa, a 40-year-old detainee at ICE’s Stewart detention center in Lumpkin, was found dead in his cell last Tuesday.  Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials say the preliminary cause of death was self-inflicted strangulation.  The case remains under investigation.


Katina Rankin/Twitter

The U.S. Department of Justice has reopened the murder case of Emmett Till, the African-American teenager killed the summer of 1955. The 14-year old was from Chicago visiting relatives in Mississippi. He was kidnapped, tortured, and killed for allegedly whistling at a white woman.


GPB Sports team

High school football season is just around the corner, and students are already on the field practicing. Before teams hit the gridiron, the GPB Sports team stopped by to talk about the upcoming season.


On Second Thought for Tuesday, July 10, 2018

Jul 10, 2018
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Just over a year ago, the Federal Bureau of Investigation arrested a 25-year-old woman in Augusta, Georgia for allegedly leaking top secret information from the National Security Agency to the press. Last month, Reality Winner pled guilty to violating the Espionage Act. Winner was sentenced to 63 months in prison and three years of supervised release. Her prosecution is the first in the trump administration’s crackdown on whistleblowers.

 


On Second Thought For Friday, July 6, 2018

Jul 6, 2018

Type any word into Google, and the search engine will offer a drop-down list of suggestions for what you should type next. So if you type "Russia collusion," Google suggests you complet eyour search with "delusion." And if you click on that suggestion, the first result is an opinion piece from the New York Post, followed by a Tucker Carlson interview on Fox News, plus a handful of YouTube videos from channels like Red Pill Christian Warrior.


On Second Thought For Thursday, July 5, 2018

Jul 5, 2018
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Experts call it a major game-changer for cold-case investigations: DNA and genetic genealogy. These methods can also identify living people. For example, DNA profiles pulled from publicly available ancestry websites were used to identify and arrest The Golden State Killer for a series of murders dating back to the 1970s and 80s. Cece Moore is chief genetic genealogist with Parabon Nanolabs and PBS’s Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. She talked about the relationship between DNA and law enforcement.

mybloge/Flickr

While Atlanta remains on Amazon’s short list for its second headquarters, not everyone likes what the company brings with it. Currently, the ACLU and Amazon employees have demanded the company to stop marketing its facial recognition technology to law enforcement. Amazon calls the technology Rekognition. It detects and analyzes not only faces, but objects and entire scenes. Ayanna Howard, chairman of the School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech and Ali Breland, tech/policy reporter at The Hill spoke about the biases in artificial intelligence and privacy concerns with technology.

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Experts call it a major game-changer for cold-case investigations: DNA and genetic genealogy. These methods can also identify living people. For example, DNA profiles pulled from publicly available ancestry websites were used to identify and arrest The Golden State Killer for a series of murders dating back to the 1970s and 80s. Cece Moore is chief genetic genealogist with Parabon Nanolabs and PBS’s Finding Your Roots with Henry Louis Gates, Jr. She talked about the relationship between DNA and law enforcement.

 

On Second Thought For Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Jul 3, 2018
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Adult businesses recently lost a few more rounds against the City of Sandy Springs. The Georgia Supreme Court ruled against an appeal by Maxim Cabaret challenging the constitutionality of Sandy Springs's ban of alcohol sales and zoning restrictions on strip clubs and other adult businesses. Sandy Springs established those restrictions and that ban in 2006.


On Second Thought For Friday, June 29, 2018

Jul 3, 2018
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The Fearless Girl now has some company in New York's male-dominated financial district. Lauren Simmons became the only full-time female floor broker at the New York Stock Echange in March, when she joined Rosenblatt Securities. She's from Marietta, Georgia and a graduate of Kennesaw State University. At 23, Simmons is the youngest trader on the floor of the Stock Exchange. She is also the second African-American woman ever to work full-time as a trader there.


La'Raven Taylor / GPB

Monica Pearson changed the face of local news in Atlanta in 1975 when she became the first woman and African-American to anchor the evening news on WSB-TV. Pearson went on to cover seven United States presidents, six Georgia governors and a state that nearly doubled in size during her years at the anchor desk. Pearson has told other peoples’ stories for nearly four decades. Today, we got to hear hers.

 

On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Jun 27, 2018
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Georgia's new hands-free driving law goes into effect Sunday, July 1. The Georgia General Assembly passed House Bill 673 earlier this year, and last month it was signed by Governor Nathan Deal. This new law requires drivers to use hands-free technology when using cell phones and other electronic devices while driving. Writing, sending or reading any text-based communication, including a text message, instant message, e-mail or internet data while holding your device is prohibited.


U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Sadie Colbert

Georgia's new hands-free driving law goes into effect Sunday, July 1. The Georgia General Assembly passed House Bill 673 earlier this year, and last month it was signed by Governor Nathan Deal. This new law requires drivers to use hands-free technology when using cell phones and other electronic devices while driving. Writing, sending or reading any text-based communication, including a text message, instant message, e-mail or internet data while holding your device is prohibited.


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Before the end of his term as Atlanta mayor, Kasim Reed announced the expansion of Piedmont Park. The Atlanta City Council recently approved the $100 million expansion. It would require $80 million from the private sector and $20 million would be given by the city of Atlanta.

 

 


On Second Thought For Friday, June 22, 2018

Jun 22, 2018
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Georgia has the nation’s third largest rural school population, but less than 30 percent of those students attend a big college or university. Part of the explanation is that students from rural areas are more likely to come from low-income households, and transitioning from a small town to a big city can both be daunting and financially nerve-racking for students thinking about college. We talked to Marjorie Poss, a guidance counselor at Pickens High School, about why students decide to stay close to home and how these fears can be overcome. We also spoke with Hannah Velcoff, a student who made the leap from Dawson County to New York University.


On Second Thought for Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Jun 20, 2018
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June is Pride Month. This year, Atlanta’s Pride Committee and the LGBT Institute at the Center for Civil and Human Rights are partnering with the Fox Theatre to celebrate the 49th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which ignited an equal rights movement in what became the LGBT community. We spoke with Emmy Award-winning comedian Wanda Sykes, who’s headlining a comedy show at the Fox in celebration of Pride Month.


June is Pride Month. This year, Atlanta’s Pride Committee and the LGBT Institute at the Center for Civil and Human Rights are partnering with the Fox Theatre to celebrate the 49th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, which ignited an equal rights movement in what became the LGBT community. We spoke with Emmy Award-winning comedian Wanda Sykes, who’s headlining a comedy show at the Fox in celebration of Pride Month.


On Second Thought for Tuesday, June 19, 2018

Jun 19, 2018
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The history of Juneteenth goes like this: President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863. But two years later, on June 19, 1865, slaves in Texas finally got the news that they were free. Now Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. However, many people have never heard of the holiday or even celebrate it. Historian and storyteller Lillian Grant Baptiste joined us from Savannah to give the history of Juneteenth and why people should celebrate the holiday.


Library of Congress

African-American history goes far beyond Black History Month in February. Today we talked about the presentation of history and how it’s changing and confronting new layers of truth. Recently, several museums and African-American exhibits have been built around the country.


 

Austin History Center / Austin Public Library

June 19 is Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. However, many people have never heard of the holiday or even celebrate it. Historian and storyteller Lillian Grant Baptiste joined us from Savannah to give the history of Juneteenth and why people should celebrate the holiday.


On Second Thought for Friday, June 15, 2018

Jun 15, 2018
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The United Methodist Children’s Home reports there are more than 15,000 children in Georgia's foster care system — and that number is growing. But because of the increased need, UMCH has to say turn away children in need at least 40 times a week, so it reached out to churches for help. That's how Brett Hillesheim started fostering children. Hillesheim has fostered 18 kids within the past few years, and he now works with UMCH. 


A Seat at the Table / GPB

One of the biggest stereotypes about black Americans is “the absent black father.” A 2013 report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows 72 percent of non-Hispanic, black women who gave birth were unmarried. However, being unmarried doesn’t mean the father isn’t involved. The CDC study also shows black men are more likely to be involved in their children’s lives compared to white men.


Courtesy Brett Hillesheim

The United Methodist Children’s Home reports there are more than 15,000 children in Georgia's foster care system — and that number is growing. But because of the increased need, UMCH has to say turn away children in need at least 40 times a week, so it reached out to churches for help.


On Second Thought for Thursday, June 14, 2018

Jun 14, 2018
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Flannery O’Connor is regarded by many as Georgia’s greatest fiction writer. Her books are written with dark humor, eccentric characters, and it’s all set in a devout Catholic faith. All of which made her a leading voice in southern gothic literature.

 

 


Simon Bierwald / Flickr

Collagically Speaking is a collage of audio work, consisting of different vibes of music. That’s according to Multi Grammy award winning Jazz musician, Robert Glasper. He assembled superband, R + R =Now.  

 

 


 

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