Emily Cureton

Reporter

Emily Cureton is a reporter for GPB News.  Her background includes producing and hosting public radio, newspaper reporting and studying foreign languages. She's lived in New York, Texas, California and Oregon; spent time in Russia, and road-tripped through Mexico and Central America. She might help you finish that crossword puzzle, or get overly competitive during a friendly game of Scrabble. And when she's not enjoying the power of words: she's probably outside, sniffing around and greeting strangers with her best friend, Hank the cow dog.  

To reach her call: 404 - 685 - 2455 .

The stress of work can often lead to unprofessional behavior. The scandals surrounding Volkswagen, Wells Fargo, and even Atlanta Public Schools demonstrate how high expectations can produce unethical decisions. Researchers at the University of Georgia just published research on what drives employees to engage in improper workplace behavior. We speak with Marie Mitchell, a Professor of Management in the Terry College of Business at UGA. Karen Rommelfanger, a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Emory University, also joins us.

 

Since the early 1970s, Atlanta has elected African-American mayors. That streak could be broken next week. In 1971, Ebony magazine called Atlanta the "black mecca of the South." We talked with Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson, who challenges that notion in his new book.

 

The holidays mean lots of food and lots of trash. Atlanta began taking a different approach to waste earlier this year, in partnership with Rubicon Global, a waste management company. They  say this “smart trash” model cuts costs for the city, and helps combat climate change. We talked with Atlanta Chief Resilience Officer Stephanie Stuckey-Benfield and Rubicon Global’s Michael Allegretti.

 

UGA has a great football team this year. They’re ranked number seven in the country -- after a spell in first. But it’s not all good news. UGA rates dead last in the Southeastern Conference when it comes to graduation success rates for student athletes – all while the university’s overall student graduation rates are way up. Eric Kelderman is Senior Reporter for the Chronicle of Higher Education. Also with us is Professor of Sports Journalism at UGA, Vicki Michaelis.

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Behind many great recipes, you’ll find stories of immigration. That’s certainly the case in the kitchen of Pati Jinich. Her grandparents immigrated from Poland to Mexico. Now, Pati is a chef and cookbook author, renowned for her Jewish-Mexican fare. GPB’s Emily Cureton caught up with her last week while she was cooking at the General Muir restaurant in Atlanta.

In recent years, Atlanta has been on a mission to turn around failing public schools, while many parents turn to charter schools. David Osborne is author of the new book, “Reinventing America’s Schools.” He suggests treating all schools a bit like charter schools would improve the situation. We talk with David Osborne and Maureen Downey, Education Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

We dedicate an entire show to the Southern drawl. Y’all listen up now…

Where did y’all come from, anyway? We can trace the use of the word all the way back to colonial ancestors. Cameron Hunt McNabb, an English professor at Southeastern University, gives us a history and dialect lesson. Plus, The Atlantic staff writer Vann Newkirk II makes the case for why y'all is needed.

Brynn Anderson / The Associated Press

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race, but one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture.

U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore has been accused of sexual misconduct by five women. Many high ranking Republicans have called on him to drop out of the race. But one state poll says Moore enjoys support by many Alabama evangelicals. This could be part of a bigger picture. In 2011, the Public Religion Research Institute found only 30 percent of white evangelicals thought elected officials who commit an immoral act could still fulfill their public duties. In 2016, that number had more than doubled, to 72 percent. We talk with Dan Cox,  Director of Research for PRRI.

School Dress Codes Ruffle Feathers

Nov 15, 2017
http://www.northwestgeorgianews.com

Atlanta Public Schools may institute a dress code to ban clothing considered distracting by school officials. At Monday night’s Board of Education meeting, two fifth-grade girls said the language of the code unfairly targets them, and not boys. They both wore leggings, which would be against the proposed rules. 

University of Georgia Press

Modern gynecology was largely born in the antebellum South -- because some of this country’s first gynecologists conducted experiments on enslaved women.  This history is explored in a new book, “Medical Bondage: Race, Gender and The Origins Of American Gynecology.” Our guest is author Deirdre Cooper Owens, an Assistant Professor at Queens College in New York. Her book came out November 15, on the University of Georgia Press.

American College of Radiology / National Cancer Institute

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South.  But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society.

Good news: breast cancer death rates dropped by nearly 40 percent in the last three decades. Breast cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosis for U.S. women. Skin cancer’s first. But there is bad news. Black women continue to die at a higher rate than whites, especially in the South. But some states have eliminated the racial disparity in breast cancer deaths. These are recent findings by the Atlanta-based American Cancer Society. Carol DeSantis is Director of Breast and Gynecological Surveillance for the organization, and our guest.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

UNODC / http://www.unodc.org/unodc/en/data-and-analysis/statistics/data.html

As a nation, we’re having more tough conversations about sexual violence and harassment, as more women step forward to accuse powerful men of abusing their positions. We have profiles for killers and terrorists, what about people who commit sexual assault and rape?

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is also a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio.

Comedian Jim Gaffigan has appeared in “That 70s Show,” “Fargo,” “Bob’s Burgers,” and many times on “Law and Order.” But he may be best known for his stand-up comedy specials, and two seasons of "The Jim Gaffigan Show." We catch up with him ahead of a live show in Atlanta this weekend.

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Paul Sherman

A lot of people collect things, and in Paul Sherman’s family, that thing is campaign memorabilia. Paul’s new book is called “Look Away: Documenting Crude and Sexist Items From the Trump Campaign Trail.” It includes several pictures from rallies in Georgia. We recently caught up with three members of the Sherman family.

Three former sheriff’s deputies in Washington County, Georgia face murder charges. A man they tased this summer died. The incident was captured on video. We talk with GPB’s Grant Blankenship, who is following the case.

Many of Georgia’s historic theaters need repairs. This month, the Atlanta-based Fox Theatre Institute gave $85,000, shared by four theaters, for historic preservation. One recipient is Rome’s DeSoto Theatre. We learn about that theater’s legacy from Rome resident Tommy Lam, whose grandfather started the DeSoto.

Reza Aslan

A new book by religious scholar Reza Aslan challenges some very old ideas about religion, and how we describe a higher power. The book is “God: A Human History.” It hits shelves this week, and Reza appears in Atlanta this Saturday as part of the Marcus Jewish Community Center’s Book Festival. He joined us live. 

Wikimedia

Republicans have long dominated Southern politics. But this year, progressive candidates in the South begin to win state and local races. Birmingham, Alabama recently joined the list of Southeastern cities electing left-leaning, African-American candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders personally endorsed Birmingham’s new Mayor-elect, Randall Woodfin, who beat a two-term Democratic incumbent in a runoff election last month. We talk with Woodfin about his campaign, and his plans for Birmingham. 

Democrats lost big in 2016. But this year, progressive candidates in the South begin to win state and local races. Birmingham, Alabama recently joined the list of Southeastern cities electing left-leaning, African-American candidates. Senator Bernie Sanders personally endorsed Birmingham’s new Mayor-elect Randall Woodfin. Woodfin beat a two-term Democratic incumbent in a runoff election last month. We talk with Woodfin about his campaign, and his plans for Birmingham.

Next Tuesday, Atlanta voters will pick a new mayor. With nine candidates vying for office, campaign fundraising and robocalls have played a major role in the race. That’s been a hot-button issue as the feds investigate pay-to-play contracts at city hall.  A joint investigation by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Georgia News Lab examines the flow of money from city contractors to the campaigns. We talk with AJC reporter Dan Klepal and Georgia News Lab reporter Ryan Basden.

Atlanta is among many American cities making an aggressive bid for Amazon’s second headquarters. The Georgia city of Stonecrest even offered to de-annex some land and name it Amazon. The company’s first HQ is in Seattle, Washington. And Seattle has some wisdom to share with other cities who might want to attract the retail giant. A new podcast is called “Prime(d): What Happens When Amazon Comes to Your Town?” It’s produced by KUOW, Puget Sound Public Radio. Reporter Joshua McNichols joins us.

The terms “alt-right,” “far-right,” and “radical right” get thrown around a lot these days. But there’s actually very little research on what those terms mean and who the people are identifying with them. Cas Mudde, Professor in the Department of International Affairs at UGA, is looking to change that. His new book is “The Far-Right in America.” He joins us to analyze the movement and its many subsets.

A full hour of tricks and treats and from the On Second Thought crew.

 

Georgia native Karin Slaughter has written several international bestsellers and they are not for the faint of heart. These are complicated, tough, and realistic thrillers. Her latest is “The Good Daughter.”  It’s about a terrifying event that rips apart a family and the small town where they live. We spoke with Karin Slaughter about revealing the dark side of Georgia’s small town life.

An Atlanta attorney accused of murder says it was a tragic accident.  The prosecutor says Tex McIver knew what he was doing when he shot his wife, Diane McIver. The case is explored in this season’s “Breakdown” podcast, produced by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. It premiered earlier this month. AJC reporter Bill Rankin joins us in the studio.

 

Atlanta is officially a soccer town. In its first season, Atlanta United broke MLS attendance records and made the playoffs. The team plays its first postseason game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium Thursday night against the Columbus Crew. We talked with AU President Darren Eales about Georgia’s growing passion for what the rest of the world calls football.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Georgia’s hunting season for firearms opened October 21. GPB’s Emily Cureton joined a father and son hunting deer together opening weekend. She sends us this audio postcard from the woods of Monroe County.

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