Celeste Headlee

Special Correspondent

Celeste Headlee is an award-winning journalist and special correspondent for GPB. She has  appeared on NPR, PBS World, CNN, BBC and other networks and began working as a public radio journalist in 1999. She was formerly a host at National Public Radio, anchoring shows like “Tell Me More,” “Talk of the Nation,” “All Things Considered” and “Weekend Edition.” Until September of 2012, Celeste was the co-host of the national morning news show, “The Takeaway” from PRI and WNYC.  

 

In 2014, she narrated the documentary “Packard: The Last Shift” for the Detroit Free Press. Headlee has won numerous awards for reporting from the Associated Press. She was selected twice to be a Getty/Annenberg Journalism Fellow and was selected as a fellow with the Institute for Journalism and Natural Resources. She was also among the first fellows in Reporting on Native Stories for National Native News. For many years, she was a mentor and managing editor for NPR’s Next Generation Radio Project, training young reporters and editors in broadcasting.

 

 

Ways to Connect

GPB News / Emily Cureton

The Georgia legislative session has begun. Among many bills in play: a sweeping plan to revitalize rural Georgia. This might mean paying people who move to the country, subsidizing internet connections, and making it easier for small hospitals to stay open and in the black. But how all this attention  translates to real improvements for people outside Atlanta remains to be seen.  We talk with Sharon Wright Austin, a political scientist at the University of Florida. And Mark Niesse, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

  

The Georgia legislative session has begun. Among many bills in play: a sweeping plan to revitalize rural Georgia. This might mean paying people who move to the country, subsidizing internet connections, and making it easier for small hospitals to stay open and in the black. But how all this attention under the Gold Dome translates to real improvements for people outside Atlanta remains to be seen.  We talk with Sharon Wright Austin, a political scientist at the University of Florida. And Mark Niesse, a reporter for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

The High Museum of Art

One of the ways we learn about the world’s many cultures is through art, but art museums have struggled to diversify their patrons. In Atlanta, the High Museum of Art has made some important to strides in that regard. In the last few years, the museum’s non-white audience has tripled.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

Atlanta’s the college football center of the world on Monday night, as the University of Georgia Dawgs try to stem the University of Alabama’s Tide, in the National Championship game. A win for Georgia would be the first national championship victory for the team in more than 35 years.

 

Atlanta’s the college football center of the world on Monday night, as the University of Georgia Dawgs try to stem the University of Alabama’s Tide, in the National Championship game. A win for Georgia would be the first national championship victory for the team in more than 35 years. We get a preview from GPB’s senior sports correspondent Jon Nelson and University of Georgia sports journalism professor Vicki Michaelis.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

The Breakroom gang joined host Celeste Headlee to weigh in on the week's news.

Marvel Studios/Disney

There are a lot of major productions currently filming in Georgia. We talked with AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett about the fourth Avengers movie and the Ant-Man sequel. Also on the docket: Son of Shaft, Ozark Season 2, and YouTube’s Karate Kid reboot.

 

The Avengers: Infinity War  was shot in Georgia recently. Another Avengers cast and crew are at work here, along with a slew of movies and TV shows. We talk about who’s working on what with Jennifer Brett. She writes the Buzz Blog for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Eric Gales

In the 1990s, blues guitarist Eric Gales was hailed as a child prodigy. With his left-handed playing technique, many compared the Memphis, Tennessee musician to Jimi Hendrix himself. Gales’ latest record is called ‘Middle of the Road,’ released last year. He’ll perform at Terminal West in Atlanta tomorrow night [Jan. 5] at 9 p.m. Producer Trevor Young caught up with him last week.

Actress Issa Rae got the attention of many audiences in 2011 with her popular Web series, "The Mis-Adventures of Awkward Black Girl." Five years later, her latest project is an HBO series called "Insecure.” Rae is up for a Golden Globe award for Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy TV Series this Sunday. We revisit a conversation with Rae about her new show and what she wishes she could tell her dad.

GPB News / Cindy Hill

When Tom Barton started working as a reporter in Savannah, the newsroom was filled with cigarette smoke and typewriters. Some 39 years later, the long-time opinion page editor is retiring. His last day with the Savannah Morning News is this week, January 5. We catch up with Barton about his career, and which stories made a difference.

Wikimedia Commons / Ken Lund.

Georgia lawmakers convene the second week of January. The Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press recently analyzed financial disclosure reports from state legislators nationwide. They found many examples of legislators using their power to benefit personal interests.  We talk with Liz Whyte, reporter with the Center for Public Integrity. And James Salzer, who covers state politics for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

jypsygen

Last month, the Federal Communications Commission repealed net neutrality. Those regulations prohibit broadband providers from blocking websites or charging for higher-quality service. But a lot of people still don’t understand what net neutrality is all about, so we break it down. Then, we take a look at how rural healthcare initiatives in Georgia will suffer without net neutrality in place.

Georgia lawmakers convene next week. The Center for Public Integrity and The Associated Press recently analyzed financial disclosure reports from state legislators nationwide. They found many examples of legislators using their power to benefit personal interests.  We talk with Liz Whyte, reporter with the Center for Public Integrity. And James Salzer, who covers state politics for the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Kin Cheung / The Associated Press

A Texas-based bitcoin network called Coinsource has installed 18 new ATM machines in Atlanta. Now, if you wonder just what the heck bitcoin is then you’re not alone. We asked Emory University finance professor Tom Smith to help us break down what bitcoin means.

 

 

Heidi May

Henry Rollins is a man who wears many hats. Perhaps best known as the frontman for the legendary 80s punk band Black Flag, Rollins now boasts a prolific career across radio, television, and the live stage. We catch up with Henry Rollins ahead of an appearance at the Variety Playhouse in Atlanta on January 7.

Wanda Irving

The U.S. ranks worst among economically developed countries in maternal deaths. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, about 700 mothers die every year; and black women face the greatest risk.

The U.S. ranks worst among economically developed countries in maternal deaths. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, at least 700 mothers die every year; and black women face the greatest risk. A recent investigation by ProPublica and NPR examines racial disparity in maternal deaths. We talk with NPR Special Correspondent Renee Montagne, who has reported in Atlanta for this series.

A show featuring producer Trevor Young’s favorite OST segments of 2017. Hosted by Celeste Headlee:

This summer, more than sixty bands flocked to Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta for the fifth annual Shaky Knees Music Festival. Producer Trevor Young caught up with many musicians there, including rocker Ron Gallo. Gallo is best known for his philosophical musings and a care-free attitude. Trevor also spoke with Fantastic Negrito. The soulful artist was the first ever winner of NPR’s Tiny Desk Contest.

Mass shootings, volatile protests and major policy changes. Hurricane, after hurricane, after hurricane. And a solar eclipse that brought us together like never before in any living person’s lifetime. Yep, 2017 was a doozy. We take stock of the biggest news stories of the year, and the deeper conversations they sparked.

If you want to see theater in one of its most nerve-racking forms, look no further than actor Colin Mochrie. The comedian is best known for his role on the short-form improvisational comedy show "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Mochrie has a richly deserved reputation for his skill at improvisation. We talked with him about his craft.

The Georgia film industry is big business - $9.5 billion big in 2017. We spent the hour meeting the people who work on film and television projects that are produced in the state

 

“My Cousin Vinny” premiered 25 years ago to critical and popular acclaim. Filmed mostly in Monticello, Georgia, it tells the story of an inexperienced New York attorney who takes on the biggest case of his career --- a murder trial. We looked back on the film’s legacy with its director, Jonathan Lynn.

A show featuring OST’s best music segments of 2017. Hosted by Celeste Headlee:

We talk with singer and songwriter Rhiannon Giddens, who is best known as the lead vocalist for the folk band the Carolina Chocolate Drops. Her new solo album, “Freedom Highway,” tells the stories of oppressed African-Americans. We caught up with her ahead of a performance at the Variety Playhouse in May.

On Second Thought For Thursday, December 21, 2017

Dec 21, 2017

We spent the hour talking about what makes Southern food Southern, how collard greens played a role in the civil rights movement, and the politics of barbecue. 

For the first time, Atlanta has a police officer dedicated to cases of animal cruelty. The position was created in October. And the first cop to fill the post is Senior Patrol Officer Amy Soelder. She’s a 22 year veteran of the force, and joins us in the studio.

Courtesy of Amy Soeldner

For the first time, Atlanta has a police officer dedicated to cases of animal cruelty. The position was created in October. And the first cop to fill the post is Senior Patrol Officer Amy Soelder. She’s a 22 year veteran of the force, and joins us in the studio.

Hunan Garden Restaurant / Facebook

Millions of American Christians are preparing to celebrate Christmas, but what about those who don’t celebrate? It’s a federal holiday, and most businesses are closed. What is Christmas like for the non-Christian?

Imperial War Museum

During December 1914, something remarkable happened. For a week before Christmas Day, French, British and German soldiers laid down their arms. They talked, sang carols, and wished each other Merry Christmas. This was known as the Christmas Truce, and did not happen again. We learned more about this piece of holiday history from Emory University professor Patrick Allitt.

 

 

Charles Schulz

"A Charlie Brown Christmas" is a beloved seasonal staple, but the Peanuts gang’s TV special wouldn’t have happened if it hadn’t been for the Coca-Cola Company in Atlanta. Lee Mendelson was the executive producer of that special. He told us that after it first aired in 1965, he didn’t expect to ever see it on TV again.

Georgia educators are filing a class-action lawsuit against the state over retirement benefits. The state Department of Community Health changed a law in 2012, effectively reducing the subsidies of any retirees who were in the school system for less than five years. We talk about the controversy with James Salzer, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

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