Bill Nigut

Host & Producer

Bill Nigut has been a program host and producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting since November, 2013. He currently hosts “Two Way Street,” a show that features long-form conversations with authors, artists, chefs, scientists and other creative people who have fascinating stories to tell. He is host and producer of “Political Rewind,” a twice-weekly political roundtable show featuring some of Georgia’s best-informed insiders weighing in on the big state and national political stories.

Bill spent 20 years as the national and state political correspondent for WSB-TV in Atlanta. In that role, he covered five presidential campaigns, traveling to Iowa, New Hampshire and other key primary states in each presidential election cycle. Bill also covered the White House and Capitol Hill for WSB, commuting from his home in Atlanta when major news stories were breaking in Washington, D.C. He grew up in Chicago, where he developed his love of rough and tumble politics and the Chicago Bears and Da Bulls.

Ways to Connect

On this edition of Political Rewind, we are live from the Georgia State Capitol for Crossover Day.  Which crucial bills will die and which will live to see another day?  Among the measures hanging in the balance: a bill to keep guns out of the hands of Georgians with mental illness and a tax break for Delta Airlines that’s now caught up in the highly charged gun control debate. 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson

Republican Insider Jackie Cushman

(AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Delta Airlines cuts ties with the NRA and now finds itself in a showdown with legislators who want to punish the Atlanta-based company by denying it a long-sought tax break.  Also at the State Capitol, an outspoken GOP legislator is under fire for telling the widow of a man killed by a distracted driver that the vote she cast on a bill was done purely out of spite.  Plus, new revelations about Russian interference in the 2016 election and how Georgians were targeted with thousands of manipulative tweets.

Panelists:

On this edition of Political Rewind, we come to you from the headquarters of the State Bar of Georgia in downtown Atlanta in front of an audience of journalists, lawyers and judges from across the state.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

This year marks the 100th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth. Bernstein, a legendary composer, educator, and humanitarian, was born in August 25, 1918. To celebrate this milestone, orchestras and theatres around the world are preforming his vast range of work.

Emily Cureton

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with former Georgia Congressman Jack Kingston.  He's making national headlines for comments calling into question the motives of students mobilizing for gun reform.  Also, as President Trump takes his first steps to improve gun safety, a very large group rallies at the Georgia State Capitol calling for gun control.  Plus, Republican leaders at the State Capitol reach an agreement to cut taxes on Georgians by half a billion dollars in the next five years.  What led to them to act now, despite initial concerns from the governor?  And, a bill to all

(AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the Florida shooting tragedy continues to dominate headlines, Georgia educators, parents and students are accessing the vulnerability of schools here.  But at the legislature, there’s little momentum toward passing new gun safety measures.  Meanwhile, President Trump blames the FBI for being too busy investigating Russia collusion to follow up on tips that the Florida shooter was a time bomb waiting to explode.  Then, as the legislature has moved past the halfway point of the session, our panel weighs in on the status of major bills today.  Plus, Robe

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the U.S. Senate shoots down Senator David Perdue’s plan to dramatically curtail legal immigration and it fails to find common ground on any immigration reform measure.  

Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

On this episode of “Two Way Street,” we’re reairing our conversion with Country legend, Bill Anderson.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

On this edition of Political Rewind, three Georgians take center stage in controversies now swirling on Capitol Hill.  FBI Director Chris Wray contradicts the White House story on when administration officials learned that Rob Porter was suspected of abusing his two former wives.  Will Chief of State John Kelly get the boot over concerns about what he knew and when?  Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue faces fire for a proposal to substitute food stamps for government-selected food boxes, but what's really behind the idea?  Also, David Perdue is in the spotlight as he pushes his plan to curt

On this edition of Political Rewind, to bring high speed internet to rural Georgia, legislators are looking at a broad range of taxes on services every Georgian uses, from streaming services to media downloads, even to satellite TV services.  Will the proposal fly in an election year?  Also, legislators look to impose a stiffer tax on used car purchases while also looking to bring back a tax break for electric vehicles.  As the legislative session unfolds, two GOP candidates for governor are dueling over a proposal to eliminate the state income tax. 

Panelists:

On this edition of Political Rewind, we take the show on the road to Savannah, thanks to an invitation from the League of Women Voters of Coastal Georgia.  Before a live audience, our panelists discussed news and issues in the Savannah area that have statewide implications.  Should the Talmadge name be stripped off the bridge that crosses over the gateway to the ever-growing Port of Savannah?  How do residents and local officials feel about the possibility of oil drilling just offshore?  We also talk about how funding is doled out for transportation issues facing the state as well as the fu

What’s your idea of quality time? Author David Giffels has an unusual answer to that. He enlisted his father to help him build his own coffin. That project is the subject of David’s new book, “Furnishing Eternity: a Father, a Son, a Coffin, and a Measure of Life.

(AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

The rules embedded in the new federal tax law could mean many Georgians will pay higher state income tax.  State legislators want to find a way to give that money back.  Will they succeed?  Also, a new report confirms what Atlantans already know—the city has some of the worst traffic in the world.  Does that add urgency to the new push in the legislature for expanding transit?  Plus, a spokesman for Casey Cagle has an interesting response to a second GOP gubernatorial candidate using Cagle’s likeness in a campaign ad.

Panelists:

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia primary elections are three months away, but already candidates for governor have amassed $10 million, and one GOP candidate spends a chunk of his case on a Super Bowl ad.  We’ll look at the latest fundraising totals.  Then, the possibility of another government shutdown looks later this week.  Can the White House and Congress reach a deal on immigration before then or will they once again kick the government spending authorization can down the road?  Plus, President Trump insists the Devin Nunes memo proves the Mueller Investigation is a fraud. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s senior United State Senator Johnny Isakson joins us just hours after the White House authorized release of the controversial memo purporting to show political bias in the FBI investigation of collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign.  We ask Isakson for his thoughts.  Plus, where does he stand on a compromise to protect DACA immigrants and build Trump’s wall, and what about another looming government shutdown next week?

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

The University of North Carolina Press

On this episode of "Two Way Street," we’re separating fact from fiction about the Gullah people. Our guest is Rutgers University History Professor, Melissa Cooper, author of "Making Gullah:  A History of Sapelo Islanders, Race, and the American Imagination."

Courtesy of Raed Mansour / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

On this edition of Political Rewind, another Georgian resigns from a high-level position in the Trump Administration.  We’ll discuss why the head of the CDC is out.  Also, Georgians respond to President Trump’s State of the Union speech.  Plus, we’ll look at news from the governor’s race: Stacey Evans wins a big endorsement and GOP candidates look to show fundraising muscle to compete with Casey Cagle as they face today’s disclosure deadline.

Panelists:

AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Georgia Senate entertains a bill that would crack down on protestors who disrupt controversial speakers on university campuses.  Does it protect or intrude upon free speech?  Also, a traditionally conservative Georgia newspaper takes aim at one of the state senate’s most conservative members on the issue of adoption.  Plus, legislation sponsored by Georgia Senator David Perdue is in the sights of a bi-partisan group of legislators on Capitol Hill.  They fear Purdue’s efforts to reduce legal immigration could threaten a compromise that would prevent a

(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the first major battles between candidates for governor break out in both the GOP and Democratic contests.  Brian Kemp accuses Casey Cagle of falling for a liberal conspiracy theory, while supporters of Democrat Stacey Abrams accuse Stacey Evans of using the image of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to advance her campaign.  Plus, Speaker of the House David Ralston weighs in on the idea of giving the state oversight of Hartsfield Jackson International Airport and Medicaid Expansion.

Panelists:

On tomorrow’s edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re exploring the work and life of Georgian Flannery O’Connor. Her works “Wise Blood” and “A Good Man is Hard to Find” earned her a reputation as one most important writers of the 20th Century. The making of that reputation is the focus of tomorrow’s conversation.

On this edition of Political Rewind, big issues bubbling up at the state capitol: legislators renew their interest in state oversight of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and a  possible return of paper balloting across Georgia.  

(AP Photo/John Bazemore)

On this edition of Political Rewind, 6th District Congresswoman Karen Handel is tapped to help other GOP candidates for congress on how to run for office in the anti-Trump atmosphere, but the AJC’s Jim Galloway says Governor Nathan Deal may be the best model for Republicans on how to win. 

Christopher Bartelsk

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we’re discussing the life and music of jazz singer Billie Holiday with actress Terry Burrell, who’s now playing her on stage, and Emory musicologist Dwight Andrews.

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Senator David Perdue puts himself front and center in one of the biggest controversies of the Trump presidency.  What does Perdue gain or lose by defending the president?  Plus, as members of Congress jockey over extending DACA and building a border wall, the deadline for passing a government spending bill hangs in the balance.  If there is a government shutdown this weekend, who will get the blame?  Then, a coalition of faith-based organizations put a controversial religious liberty bill back in play at the state capital.  What’s likely to happe

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with Dr. Meria Carstarphen, the Superintendent of Atlanta Public Schools.  We’ll look at how she’s rebuilding a school system rocked by a scandal that made national headlines before her arrival and we’ll ask her to weigh in on the impact that state education policies championed by Governor Deal and Trump administration proposals are having on public schools.  Plus, we’ll access the impact of the vulgar remarks President Trump allegedly made about immigrants from Haiti, El Salvador and some African countries.

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