Adam Ragusea

Backup host "On Second Thought"

Adam is host of Current's podcast, "The Pub." He's a Journalist in Residence and Visiting Assistant Professor of Journalism at the Center for Collaborative Journalism at Mercer University in Macon, Ga. He’s also reported for public radio shows including "Morning Edition," "All Things Considered," "Here & Now," "Marketplace" and "The Takeaway." Before becoming a journalist, Adam studied music composition, and he creates all the music for "The Pub."

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Virginia Prescott joined the On Second Thought team at Georgia Public Broadcasting earlier in May. Prescott, the new host of On Second Thought, comes to GPB from New Hampshire Public Radio, where she hosted "Word of Mouth" and the "Civics 101" podcast, which is used in classrooms throughout the United States. She spoke with Adam Ragusea about the move from New England to the South, and why she loves Georgia.

Pete Souza / Barack Obama Presidential Library

Just as we do at the end of every week, this Friday we brought together a group of four smart people to help us break down the week's news.

 

On Second Thought host Adam Ragusea sat down with our Breakroom panel — Christeene Alcosiba, Caleb Logan, Willoughby Mariano, Hector Fernandez to debate the topics Georgia is talking about.

Sid Ceaser Photography

Virginia Prescott joined the On Second Thought team at Georgia Public Broadcasting earlier in May.

 

Prescott, the new host of On Second Thought, comes to GPB from New Hampshire Public Radio, where she hosted "Word of Mouth" and the "Civics 101" podcast, which is used in classrooms throughout the United States.

On Second Thought For Thursday, May 24, 2018

May 24, 2018

Last month, cast members from TV’s “A Different World” reunited at Home Depot’s Atlanta headquarters. They were there to award renovation grant money to nine Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports HBCUs have received less philanthropic support than most colleges and universities, particularly for infrastructure and campus renovation projects. The AJC has looked at the role of HBCU’s across the country and the financial health of these schools. We spoke with AJC reporter Ernie Suggs.

On Second Thought For Wednesday, May 23, 2018

May 23, 2018

After writing his New York Times op-ed, “Dear White America," George Yancy received hundreds of hateful messages. Yancy, an Emory University professor of philosophy, knew that his letter was controversial, but he says he never thought he would receive literal death threats. This past April, he released his newest book, "Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America." It addresses how people confronted him after the publication of his op-ed, and how to proceed from there. In his book, he asks white Americans to rise above their initial racial response and have empathy for the African-American community. George Yancy joined us in studio to talk about "Backlash."

Courtesy Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

After writing his New York Times op-ed, “Dear White America," George Yancy received hundreds of hateful messages. Yancy, an Emory University professor of philosophy, knew that his letter was controversial, but he says he never thought he would receive literal death threats.

This past April, he released his newest book, "Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America."

© European Union 2016 / European Parliament

Syria is suffering its worst humanitarian crisis in years.

 

The United Nations estimates some 5.6 million Syrians have fled their country in search of a safer place to live. President Trump capped the number of refugees allowed in the United States last year. The U.S. admitted close to 28,000 refugees in 2017, a dramatic reduction from 93,000 people allowed in the year before.

 

Khawla al-Abdullah arrived in Atlanta two years ago. She's originally from Aleppo, Syria.

On Second Thought For Tuesday, May 22, 2018

May 22, 2018

Some Georgia law schools want to appeal to more than their traditional law school students. In the fall, the University of Georgia begins offering a graduate degree program for non-lawyers. As schools broaden the appeal of the law, there is major concern about Georgia’s lawyer shortage, particularly in rural areas. We have seen a number of companies form that offer online legal services, but are these viable alternatives?

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Atlanta is known as the “city in a forest." More than 1/3 of the city is covered in trees, standing well above most American cities

But as Atlanta experiences a development boom, the green canopy is shrinking. Private property is the main factor behind this destruction. 

Family of Henry "Peg" Gilbert

In 1947 in Harris County, Georgia, an African-American man named Henry “Peg” Gilbert was arrested and jailed, without legal cause.

Five days later, a mob beat him to death in his jail cell. He was a deacon at Union Springs Baptist Church as well as a respected landowner. He was arrested by the county’s sheriff on suspicions of Gilbert hiding a fugitive. There was never a trial or conviction. 

meltwater / Flickr

The United States Department of Justice estimates nearly two-thirds of all jail inmates have mental health problems.

 

In Georgia, a new investigation raises serious questions about the quality of care those inmates receive.

It's been 100 years since a Spanish influenza epidemic killed as many as 50 million people worldwide, including 675,000 Americans. A new book on the deadly pandemic is out this week. It's called “More Deadly Than War.” The author, Kenneth C. Davis, talked with us about how the Spanish flu affected the course of World War I.

Still from YouTube / GPB

Just as we do at the end of every week, this Friday we brought together a group of four smart people to help us break down the week's news. On Second Thought host Adam Ragusea sat down with our Breakroom panel — Soumaya Khalifa, Greg Williams, Natalie Pawelski and Nemr — to put a rest to the Laurel vs. Yanny debate, process the royal wedding drama and analyze the antics of Georgia's GOP candidates for governor

Courtesy of the National Museum of Health and Medicine / Armed Forces Institute of Pathology

It's been 100 years since a Spanish influenza epidemic killed as many as 50 million people worldwide, including 675,000 Americans.

Devin Pedde

In 2016, Grammy-winning mandolinist Chris Thile was tasked with recreating one of public radio's most popular programs, as the second-ever host of "A Prairie Home Companion."

Now in its second season, the show has been recreated once over with a new title: "Live From Here." 

"It's a show title that really works for what we're doing, which is hopefully anything," Thile told us. "That's what gives me the biggest thrill ... sitting down in my little studio on Monday with a blank canvas." 

Summer Evans / GPB

The heavy metal band Mastodon got its start performing in Georgia in 2000. Nearly two decades later, the band has a Grammy Award and returns to Atlanta with a show at the Fox Theatre.

We sat down with Brann Dailor, Mastodon's drummer and vocalist, to talk about the band's journey to stardom and its latest album "Emperor of Sand." 

Actor Tony Hale first rose to fame as the ultimate mother's boy Buster Bluth on the show "Arrested Development." Hale also starred in the HBO series “Veep.”  His character was the personal assistant to President Selina Meyer, played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. Hale's parents live in the Macon area and he spends a lot of time in Georgia. We talked with him in 2016 about his career. 

Georgia is a hub of multiculturalism. At Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, there’s a new class tapping into that topic. It's called "Literary Tribalism: How to Read Race, Class, Nation & Gender." Oglethorpe University English professor Reshmi Hebbar joined us in studio to tell us about her new class. Her students, Caleb Logan and Yasmin Tehrani, also joined the conversation.

Adam Ragusea / Center for Collaborative Journalism / GPB

Police aren't required by law to collaborate with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) on immigration control. It's a choice.

 

Athens-Clarke County recently joined at least seven other Georgia communities that refuse to honor ICE detainers. That’s when ICE asks local jails to hold people they’ve booked until ICE agents can come get them.

 

It’s a different story elsewhere in Georgia, a recent investigation found. According to an article reported by On Second Thought's Adam Ragusea and his journalism students at Mercer University's Center for Collaborative Journalism, some cities and counties eagerly cooperate with ICE.

Courtesy of Roadside Entertainment | Man Made Film

The world’s only transgender bodybuilding competition is held every fall in Atlanta. It's called Trans Fit Con.

 

"Man Made," a new documentary, follows the lives of four transgender men who trained to compete at Trans Fit Con in 2016. The film won the Documentary Feature Jury Award at last month's Atlanta Film Festival.

 

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Georgia is a hub of multiculturalism.

 

At Oglethorpe University in Atlanta, there’s a new class tapping into that topic. It's called "Literary Tribalism: How to Read Race, Class, Nation & Gender."

May is Older Americans Month. In 2017, Georgia ranked 41st in the nation for senior health. GPB Special Correspondent Celeste Headlee talked about the state of our elder care system with Kathy Floyd, executive director for the Georgia Council on Aging, and Glenn Ostir, director of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

Adam Ragusea / Center for Collaborative Journalism

In a predominantly Latino immigrant neighborhood outside of Warner Robins, a woman got up and headed to work.

She has asked not to be identified, so that coming forward about what happened next on that recent morning won’t be used against her, as she fights to stay in the country she’s called home for 15 years.

As she drove away, the woman said, she saw a Houston County sheriff’s deputy parked at a house near hers.

“He was waiting,” she said in Spanish.

The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. Brown's departure comes amid what another outgoing editor called a "transformation" of the newspaper. Brown joined us in the studio to discuss the way local news is changing and reflect on his longtime career covering the news in middle Georgia. 

Leighton Rowell / GPB

This week we talked about the psychology of newlyweds, an unsung civil rights hero and the future of local news. So, as always, we invited a group of smart people to help us break down the week's biggest headlines.

Natalie Pawelski, vice president of Cater Communications, conservative radio host Greg Williams, Kennesaw State University Roxanne Donovan and Decatur-based author Nicki Salcedo joined this week's Breakroom.

Adam Ragusea / GPB

The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. 

Last month, investigators in Atlanta recovered about 500 pounds of methamphetamine hidden inside Disney figurines. That's worth about $2 million. Drug Enforcement Administration officials not only say that Atlanta is a hub for crystal meth distribution; according to the DEA, meth also the "No. 1 threat" in the metro area.

Sanford Health / Flickr

A new study from Johns Hopkins University finds that 1 in 8 organ transplants in the United States involves organs from someone who died of a drug overdose, adding another set of ethical questions to a hot-button issue.

 

With higher rates of homelessness and poverty, as well as diseases such as HIV, the demographic makeup of donors who have died of overdoses is radically different from that of the “normal” pool of organ donors.

 

Could organs from patients who overdosed actually pose health risks to the people who receive them? To answer this question, we turned to Dr. Christine Durand, who co-authored the study.

 

Radspunk / Wikimedia Commons

Last month, investigators in Atlanta recovered about 500 pounds of methamphetamine hidden inside Disney figurines. That's worth about $2 million. Drug Enforcement Administration officials not only say that Atlanta is a hub for crystal meth distribution; according to the DEA, meth also the "No. 1 threat" in the metro area.

New research on anxiety in the workplace finds in some cases, anxiety can actually help improve employee performance. Georgia State University psychology professor Page Anderson developed a technology to help people with social anxiety by using virtual reality. The software simulates real life settings that cause patients anxiety, helping them learn to cope before they have to confront the same scenarios in the real world. 

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