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Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET

The American Bar Association said the Senate should not hold a confirmation vote on Brett Kavanaugh's nomination to the Supreme Court until the FBI investigated sexual assault allegations against him that were made by Christine Blasey Ford and other women.

Across the country, Americans were transfixed Thursday by television coverage of Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh as they testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Ford spoke of her allegation that the Supreme Court nominee had sexually assaulted her when they were teenagers in 1982. Kavanaugh vehemently denied it.

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Let's bring in one of the senators who was asking the questions today, Vermont Democrat Patrick Leahy. Senator Leahy, welcome.

PATRICK LEAHY: Thank you very much.

Across the U.S., people spent the day rapt, watching or listening to the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford and Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday.

The proceedings were emotional throughout, as Ford told the story of the sexual assault that she alleges Kavanaugh made against her when the two were in high school, more than 30 years ago.

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We turn now to NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. She's been following the hearing all day. And, Nina, to start, let's just put this in context. What were your impressions?

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A day of drama and history on Capitol Hill today. To talk it through, we want to bring in NPR political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben. Hey, Danielle.

DANIELLE KURTZLEBEN, BYLINE: Hello.

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A day of drama and history on Capitol Hill today. To talk it through, we want to bring in our national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hey, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi there.

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

CHUCK GRASSLEY: We continue our hearing on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to serve as associate justice.

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Well, that hearing wrapped just before 7 tonight here in Washington. Throughout, emotions ran high on all sides. NPR's Tamara Keith joins me now from the White House to talk through the day. Hi again, Tam.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Hello.

As Christine Blasey Ford testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday, people across the U.S. tuned in to watch her tell the emotional story of her alleged sexual assault by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavavaugh more than 30 years ago.

Across the country — on the radio, television or the phones they carried — Americans listened.

On airplanes, they watched. And some cried.

They watched on C-SPAN, where some viewers began calling in with their own stories of sexual assault.

Ahead of the midterm elections, NPR's Morning Edition wants to connect with young, unmarried voters who are approaching a pivotal moment in their life. What issues matter to you this election? Share your story with us.

A producer may reach out to you to follow up on your response. Share your thoughts with us below or here.

What issues are most important to you this election?

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(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

CHRISTINE BLASEY FORD: (Reading) I am here today not because I want to be. I am terrified. I am here because I believe it is my civic duty to tell you what happened to me while Brett Kavanaugh and I were in high school.

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Christine Blasey Ford has just begun to speak to the Senate Judiciary Committee, offering testimony today against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Let's just bring the sound of that as we hear a bit of her opening statement.

Updated at 8:47 p.m. ET

Judge Brett Kavanaugh was defiant and visibly angry as he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday afternoon, rebutting earlier emotional testimony from the woman who has accused him of sexual assault, Christine Blasey Ford.

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It took more than 10 minutes for paramedics to arrive after a housekeeper found a man collapsed on the floor of a bathroom in a Boston Veteran Affairs building.

The paramedics immediately administered naloxone, often known by its brand name Narcan, to reverse the man's opioid overdose. But brain damage can begin after just a few minutes without oxygen.

Sen. Mazie Hirono On Kavanaugh Hearing

Sep 27, 2018

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It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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Before the testimony of his Supreme Court nominee and before the testimony of his accuser, we have testimony, or strictly speaking, a press conference, from the president of the United States.

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The accusations against Brett Kavanaugh are mounting, with a third woman going public with a charge of sexual misconduct against the Supreme Court nominee. Today on Capitol Hill, the first of Kavanaugh's accusers is taking the stand.

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