Arts & Culture

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Call it a happy ending to a fish-out-of-water story.

Today, a one-of-a-kind, fiberglass shark cast from the same mold as the iconic, mechanical sharks used in the 1975 classic movie, Jaws, is leaving home.

After more than 25 years keeping watch over Aadlen Brothers Auto Wrecking, a junkyard in Sun Valley, Calif., the shark known as Bruce is headed to a museum.

This matters to me. Because the shark and I have a past.

Like many people, I used to be afraid to go in the ocean because of Jaws.

Author Jesmyn Ward won a National Book Award for Salvage the Bones, her gritty and lyrical novel of Hurricane Katrina-era Mississippi. In this essay, as in all of her work, she doesn't mince words.

Still Toasting To Robert Burns After All These Years

Jan 27, 2016
Sam Whitehead / GPB

Scottish poet Robert Burns died more than 200 years ago, but his work is still cause for celebration.

Each year in late January, around his birthday, fans of the poet hold dinner parties in his honor. The gatherings, called Burns Suppers, are held all around the world.

 

Friendsgiving: Taking Holidays Back From The Holidays

Nov 23, 2015
Sam Whitehead / GPB

Most holidays have some kind of baggage. Christmas has commercialism. Thanksgiving has travel headaches.

But one holiday celebrated this time of year seems, so far, to remain free of any such entanglements.

Making Designers Out Of Everyone With 3-D Printing

Oct 28, 2015
Sam Whitehead / GPB

3-D printing has been used for years to solve all kinds of problems. Ford Motor Company has been using the technology since the 1980s for prototyping, and, recently, scientists have even used it to print custom skin grafts for burn victims.

One Atlanta art museum is working to make sure 3-D printing and the problem solving it enables stays in the hands of regular people.

An intimate portrait of civil rights icon Rosa Parks. The world knew her as the quiet but courageous activist who challenged Alabama’s Jim Crow laws by refusing to give up a seat on a Montgomery city bus to a white man. But Rosa Parks was also a loving wife and aunt to 13 children born to her brother Sylvester and his wife.

Harper Lee and Chuck Reece

Feb 21, 2015

    

A look at Southern culture – the good and the bad:

Readers everywhere are eager to see the new book by Harper Lee, the Pulitzer-prize winning author of To Kill a Mockingbird. We talk with Melita Easters, the Atlanta writer who wrote a one-woman play about Harper Lee’s life who shares with us little-known stories about the gifted but reclusive author.

Love = Chocolate and Great Food!

Feb 14, 2015

Food and romance are inextricably linked, and so our Valentines weekend special features conversations with two stars of the Georgia food world.

Kristin Hard makes some of the finest chocolates anywhere. She knows the business from cultivating and fermenting the seeds of cacao trees to creating unique flavor profiles.

Ebola Ethics

Nov 8, 2014

Host Bill Nigut talks with Dr. Paul Wolpe, Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University. Wolpe is a bio-ethicist who looks at ethics in the practice of medicine. The conversation focuses on ethical and moral considerations surrounding the prevention and treatment of Ebola. For example, Zmapp, a potentially life-saving Ebola drug has been in such short supply a very limited number of patients can receive the drug. Who should get it? Who should not? What are the factors that weigh into that decision?

This special edition of Two Way Street is a broadcast of a conversation with global authorities discussing the ongoing threat of nuclear war. The program was sponsored by the Sam Nunn Institute of International Affairs at Georgia Tech and was taped in front of a live audience at Georgia Public Broadcasting last month. Bill Nigut was the moderator.

Bill Nigut hosts guests who tell stories of strong, courageous women in real life and in the world of fiction. First up is author and historian Karen Abbott.Her new non-fiction book "Liar, Soldier, Temptress, Spy" tells the story of four women who defied their gender-based roles to fight in the Civil War, one by posing as a man to fight as a solider, the others spying against the enemy.

This week, TWS focuses on two of Georgia's most dynamic entrepreneurs. Clark Howard and Jeff Hilimire.

A Conversation With Krista Bremer, Author Of My Accidental Jihad:

Atlanta's Power Financial Couple Jeff Sprecher & Kelly Loefler have become the highest profile married couple in Atlanta. He is the Atlanta businessman who made and won an audacious bid to buy the NY Stock Exchange. She works with him in the business but is also a principal owner of the WNBA Atlanta Dream.

Bull Durham and Factory Man

Sep 6, 2014

Bull Durham: From Film To Broadway-Bound Musical:
Released in 1988, Ron Shelton wrote and directed what many film organizations call one of the greatest sports movies, Bull Durham. He could have chosen any region of the country to tell his baseball story, but Shelton set the scene in the South. The reason, Shelton says, is because of his Southern roots.

Michael Shapiro – Director of the High Museum of Art. Shapiro has formed ground-breaking partnerships with some of the world’s most revered art institutions, including the Louvre. Before the partnership with the High Museum, the Louvre had never released works from its collection to any museum. 

Segment 1&2: During her 13 years as obituaries editor of the Atlanta Constitution Kay Powell developed a wide following for her ability to uncover unexpected, moving and often funny details about the lives of the ordinary people who were the subjects of most of her obits. Kay says her job was to write personality profiles – it just happens the people she wrote about were all dead. She shares wonderful stories about her career.

 

 

 

Segment 1&2: During her 13 years as obituaries editor of the Atlanta Constitution Kay Powell developed a wide following for her ability to uncover unexpected, moving and often funny details about the lives of the ordinary people who were the subjects of most of her obits. Kay says her job was to write personality profiles – it just happens the people she wrote about were all dead. She shares wonderful stories about her career.

What Value Do You Put On The Work Of Low Wage Earners?

The fight over raising the minimum wage remains unresolved in Washington. But that debate, plus the fight over whether to allow those in this country illegally to seek jobs raises a deeper, more subtle question: what value do we put on the work of low-wage earners?

Ebola: Dispelling The Myths
With the arrival of Ebola patients Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol at Emory University Hospital, there is probably no city or state more aware of the fight to stop the spread of Ebola than here in Atlanta and Georgia.

Dr. Mark Rosenberg, President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health joins Bill Nigut to talk about the questions surrounding the Ebola virus.
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This year is the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Atlanta. The Cyclorama, the 128-year-old painting of the Civil War battle, is getting a new home.

In July, Atlanta mayor Kasim Reed and officials from the Atlanta History Center announced that the painting would move from its longtime home in Atlanta’s Grant Park to the History Center in Buckhead, where it will become the centerpiece of a multi-million dollar expansion and renovation.

 The Vision Behind Atlanta’s Center For Civil And Human Rights

Atlanta’s Center for Civil and Human Rights has been open for almost a month. The vision for the center began during the tenure of Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin.

One of the hardest working people behind the vision of the Center for Civil Rights was Doug Shipman, who started as pro-bono consultant on the project, but soon went on to work full time in the center's development
 

What’s Happening To The Honey Bees?

 

Jimmy Carter And The Evolution Of Evangelical Christianity

On July 15, 1976, Jimmy Carter strode to the podium at the Democratic national convention in Madison Square Garden in New York to accept the Democratic nomination for President of the United States.

In Atlanta's Core, The AIDS Epidemic Is Skyrocketing. Today, thanks to new medications, HIV infections and AIDS are no longer the death sentence they once were. That may be the reason AIDS has fallen out of the media spotlight. But that doesn’t mean the virus has gone away.

In Atlanta, HIV infection in some neighborhoods is skyrocketing, nearing the same level as some African nations.

The New York Stock Exchange And The Atlanta Dream: All In A Day’s Work For Jeff Sprecher And Kelly Loeffler

Kenny Leon is a Broadway and Hollywood director who makes his home in Atlanta. He won his first Tony award in June for directing a revival of "A Raisin In The Sun" starring Denzel Washington.

Now, Leon is appearing on stage in Atlanta in a production of Bernard Slade’s "Same Time Next Year" at True Colors, his theatre company in Atlanta. His co star is Phylicia Rashad, who created the iconic role of Claire Huxtable on “The Cosby Show”.

 

Bill Nigut debuts his new weekly radio program "Two Way Street with Bill Nigut" at 4 PM, Saturday, July 5 on 88.5, GPB Atlanta)

More than 40 years ago, I started my first job in broadcasting: hosting a one-hour daily radio show on WLTD-AM in Chicago, my hometown.

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